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The Science of Sex

A podcast about the ins and outs of the latest research about everyone’s favorite topic hosted by Dr. Zhana and Joe Pardavila.Looking to have your sex questions answered? Send them over to scienceofsexpodcast@gmail.com!

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#4 – Unlocking the Secrets of the Female Orgasm

Dr. Zhana and Joe talk to a doctor who’s been called “The Vagina Scientist.” Dr. James Pfaus and his team published an article attempting to resolve the controversy surrounding clitoral versus vaginal orgasms and we break it down in this episode of “The Science of Sex.” Also on the show, Zhana and Joe talk about the skyrocketing STI rates in seniors and the survey that says 40% of couples don’t sleep in the same bed!Facebook Twitter Google+PinterestLinkedIn0Shares

51mins

20 Oct 2017

Rank #1

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#42 – What Your Sexual Fantasies Say About You

In Episode 42, Dr. Justin Lehmiller returns to talk with Dr. Zhana and Joe about sexual fantasies and what they say about us! Most people have sexual fantasies, and some fantasies are not as rare as you might think. What do our fantasies mean? Should we act on them and if so how? Dr. Justin Lehmiller talks about his new book Tell Me What You Want: The Science of Sexual Desire and How It Can Help You Improve Your Sex Life. Listen to find out which are the most common sexual fantasies, how our fantasies differ according to our age, gender and political beliefs, as well as the ways we can normalize sexual fantasies and potentially make them realities.  About our Guest Dr. Justin Lehmiller is a social psychologist, Research Fellow at The Kinsey Institute, and author of the new book Tell Me What You Want. Dr. Lehmiller is an award-winning educator and a prolific scholar who has published more than 40 pieces of academic writing to date. Dr. Lehmiller’s research focuses on topics including casual sex, sexual fantasy, sexual health, and friends with benefits. Dr. Lehmiller has run the popular blog Sex and Psychology since 2011 and he is a popular freelance writer, penning columns and op-eds for major publications, including Playboy, USA Today, VICE, Psychology Today, and New York Magazine. He has been named one of 5 “Sexperts” You Need to Follow on Twitter by Men’s Health, and is a go-to expert on sex for several major media outlets. Visit his website. Or follow him on Instagram @justinjlehmiller or on twitter @JustinLehmiller. Don’t miss this week’s foreplay… A new study shows that it takes just a third of a second to realize you are attracted to someone and only a quarter of a second to recognize a person’s gender. Spotting attractiveness and gender so quickly could better increase our chances of finding a mate. We associate attractiveness with intelligence and better health which helps us make snap judgments about potential mates. Click here to find out more. Before Next Time… Remember to like The Science of Sex Podcast on Facebook, Twitter, and check out our website at scienceofsexpodcast.com! Check out Dr. Zhana at a comedy variety show Wednesday October 3rd at 8 pm! Click here for more details. For more in-person sex science, check out Dr. Zhana at the Touchpoint Town Hall on October 15th, for her seminar on How to Be In An Open Relationship. See the event live at the Assemblage, or listen in on the Touchpoint Podcast. RSVP here to reserve your ticket for this free event! Check out Dr. Zhana’s next Sex Science Social: Debunking Sex Myths That Ruin Lives, on October 18th. She will be discussing some common myths that get pushed around that can be detrimental to relationships! Click here to reserve your tickets for the event! Remember to submit comments, questions, and everything in between on our Get in Touch Page! Do you love The Science of Sex Podcast and all the work Dr. Zhana does? Support her by becoming a monthly Patreon Supporter!Facebook Twitter Google+PinterestLinkedIn29Shares

1hr 5mins

2 Oct 2018

Rank #2

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#53 – Why You’re Doing It Matters

Optimizing Sexual Satisfaction We all know having sex with our romantic partners is good for our relationship and sexual satisfaction. But why you’re doing it can make a difference; not all sexual motives were made equal. Some reasons to have sex lead to better and healthier outcomes than other reasons. Optimizing your intimate life is partly about making sure you’re doing “it” for the right reasons, and not doing “it” for the wrong reasons.   In Episode 53, Dr. Zhana and Joe talk to Dr. Jessica Wood about her research on the different types of reasons people have sex, how these different motives affect their relationship and sexual satisfaction differently, and whether this differs between folks in monogamous versus consensually nonmonogamous relationships. Curious about what the “good” and the “bad” reasons are? Tune in to learn more! You can read the full study discussed in the episode, here. About our Guest Dr. Jessica Wood is a Research Associate in the Department of Psychology at York University and the University of Guelph. Her research examines how sexual motivations are associated with relationship and sexual satisfaction, needs fulfillment, and sexual problems and challenges. Jessica also conducts research on the determinants of sexual health behaviors and barriers to healthcare access for people with developmental disabilities. She is currently a research specialist with the Sex Information & Education Council of Canada (SIECCAN). You can follow Dr. Jessica Wood on Twitter, here. Before Next Time… Please consider supporting The Science of Sex Podcast and all the work Dr. Zhana does by becoming a monthly Patreon Supporter! Like The Science of Sex Podcast on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram! Visit Lelo to fulfill your high-quality vibrator needs with a wide selection of vibrators for all! Use discount code SCIENCE to get 20% off on your new vibrating toy. Visit Adam & Eve and use promo code SCIENCE for 50% off just about any product. Plus 3 FREE adult DVDs, FREE mystery gift and FREE shipping. Remember to submit comments, questions, and everything in between on our Get in Touch Page! For more sex science articles, events and discussions please join our Science of Sex Facebook group!Facebook Twitter Google+PinterestLinkedIn24Shares

52mins

19 Dec 2018

Rank #3

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#16 – Orgasms for Dummies

It might not be a surprise that, on average, straight women orgasm less frequently than straight men, but why is this? A 2014 nationally representative study of Americans ages 18-59 found that 91% of men but only 64% of women reported orgasm during their most recent partnered sex. However, lesbians orgasm much more frequently and reliably than heterosexual and bisexual women, but for the men, there are fewer, if any, sexual orientation differences when it comes to orgasm frequency. A new study surveyed over 50,000 Americans that more or less confirmed these gender and sexual orientation differences in orgasm rates. The survey extended the research into understanding some of the demographic factors and sexual practices that are linked to higher or lower rates of orgasm. Speaking with us on this episode is the lead author on this study, Dr. David Frederick. About Our Guest Dr. Frederick got his PhD from UCLA and is now an Assistant Professor of Psychology at Chapman University in California. His work uses perspectives from social psychology, health psychology, and evolutionary psychology to better understand human sexual motivations, attractions, body image, sexual satisfaction and orgasm, and sexual orientation differences in some of these constructs. Don’t Miss This Week’s Foreplay… A controversial new app, LegalFling, is hoping to take any element of question out of sexual encounters. It creates legally binding contracts pertaining to sexual consent during hookups. The contracts could include options like having a list of sexual do’s and don’ts, photo and video approval, whether a condom should be used, whether explicit language can be used, and a guarantee that prospective partners are STD-free. Although a good concept in theory, some legal activists are saying the concept is a bad one, citing the fact that consent for sexual activity can be withdrawn at any time including after sex has started. Read full article here. It has been proven that rural women start having sex younger than city girls, and also end up having more children. The CDC released its findings of a study of 10,000 American women. By looking at differences in their sexual activity, it was revealed that countryside girls started having sex at 16.6 years old, compared to urban ones who waited until 17.4 years old. At the age of 18, three quarters of the rural women are having sex, and only 68.6 percent from the cities. Perhaps the teenagers growing up in larger towns have other forms of entertainment? Countryside ladies also end up having more children. However, they also used more fool-proof contraception than the city teens, who admitted that they rely more on the (risky!) “pull-out” method. Read article discussed here. According to a new study, the biggest sexual turn-off for men (BY FAR) is trying to have a baby. When men were trying to conceive, they were 22% less interested in having sex, making it more of a mood killer than depression, being tired, or even having erectile dysfunction issues. The researchers say there are two main reasons: One, men feel like trying to conceive takes some of the passion away, and two, it can lead to serious frustration if a couple is having problems. Read full article here.Facebook Twitter Google+PinterestLinkedIn0Shares

1hr

26 Jan 2018

Rank #4

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#45 – The Truth About Female Infidelity

Are women’s sex drives really weaker than men’s? Are women really less likely to cheat–or want to cheat? Are they really better suited for monogamy? And how much are these gender differences due to nature vs. nurture? In Episode 45, we bring best-selling author Dr. Wednesday Martin on the show to talk about her new book UNTRUE: Why Nearly Everything We Believe About Women, Lust, and Adultery is Wrong and How the New Science Can Set Us Free, which reviewers say totally upends our common beliefs about these issues. Tune in to hear some of the surprising insights Dr. Martin gleaned from her interviews with numerous (mostly female!) researchers across a range of academic disciplines, discussions with women living various adulterous or openly nonmonogamous lifestyles, and immersive visits to sex parties and sex workshops.  We had such a fascinating–and at times heated–conversation with Dr. Martin, that we decided to devote the whole episode to it and skip the foreplay this time. Please enjoy, share, and get Dr. Martin’s book for even more info on the subject. About our Guest Dr. Wednesday Martin is a feminist cultural critic and #1 New York Times bestselling author. She earned her PhD in comparative literature and cultural studies, with a focus on anthropology, from Yale University. Her other notable books include Stepmonster: A New Look at Why Real Stepmothers Think, Feel, and Act the Way We Do and her memoir Primates of Park Avenue.” The Atlantic calls UNTRUE “revolutionary” and predicts “it may well set off nuclear bombs in bedrooms and boardrooms.” Visit her website or follow her on Instagram @wednesdaymartinphd or Twitter @wednesdaymartin. Before Next Time… Remember to like The Science of Sex Podcast on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram!      For more sex science articles, events and discussions please join our Science of Sex Facebook group! Visit Adam & Eve and use promo code SCIENCE for 50% off just about any product. Plus 3 FREE adult DVDs, FREE mystery gift and FREE shipping. Check out Dr. Zhana on November 20th at her Think & Drink event where she will be debunking some common myths about the female orgasm, learn while enjoying a drink! Buy tickets here. Remember to submit comments, questions, and everything in between on our Get in Touch Page! Do you love The Science of Sex Podcast and all the work Dr. Zhana does? Support her by becoming a monthly Patreon Supporter!Facebook Twitter Google+PinterestLinkedIn9Shares

1hr 2mins

23 Oct 2018

Rank #5

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#3 – Brains of promiscuous men are different than those of monogamous men?

A recent study out of UT Austin found that the brains of highly promiscuous men processed romantic information differently than the brains of highly monogamous men. This was not the case with sexual information – both groups processed those similarly. Dr. Zhana and Joe discussed the study with lead researcher, Dr. Lisa Dawn Hamilton.Facebook Twitter Google+PinterestLinkedIn0Shares

47mins

13 Oct 2017

Rank #6

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#17 – Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Cuckolding

Could cuckolding be a positive thing for some couples? A new study investigates fantasies about and experiences with cuckolding in a large and diverse sample of gay-identified men. The study received media attention, with CNN reporting “Cuckolding could be positive for some couples.” One of the study’s authors is not a scientist but is probably a familiar name to most listeners: Dan Savage. We spoke with the lead author of the study, Dr, Justin Lehmiller. About Our Guest Dr. Justin J. Lehmiller received his Ph.D. in Social Psychology from Purdue University. He is currently the Director of the Social Psychology Graduate Program at Ball State University. Dr. Lehmiller is also a Research Fellow at The Kinsey Institute. Don’t Miss This Week’s Foreplay… A new survey of more than 20,000 U.K. employees uncovered nearly 90 percent of them admitting to some form of sexual interaction in the office. Although office relationships are often discouraged in most corporate environments, the dating app survey found that sexual activity inside office workplaces is quite common. Among the 20,238 British people surveyed by Saucy Dates, 87 percent said they “have engaged in sexual activity” in the office at some point throughout the span of their career. Read full article here. Afterglow New research from Confi, a digital health startup founded at Harvard Business School, shows that men and women have different expectations when it comes to sex. The survey looked at 1,200 young people between 18 and 25, the majority of whom identified as straight. 45% of men surveyed said they expect vaginal sex from someone who goes home with them after a party. But when you consider the fact that just 31% of women said the same, you can really see the problem: there’s a 14 percent disparity of expectations. That means that 14 percent of the time there may be men expecting sex that women aren’t planning on having. Read article discussed here.Facebook Twitter Google+PinterestLinkedIn0Shares

1hr 2mins

2 Feb 2018

Rank #7

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#13 – What turns on Women who are into Casual Sex?

Contrary to many popular stereotypes, there are many women who are as equally into casual sex as some men, but what do these women prefer when it comes to their partners? A new study found that women who are more interested in casual sex differ from women who are not into hookups in the kinds of men they’re interested in, especially when it comes to hookup partners as opposed to relationship partners. This week, Naomi Muggleton, the lead author on this study, is talking to us about her research on this topic. About Our Guest Naomi Muggleton is a PhD student in Behavioral Science in the Psychology department at the University of Warwick, UK. Her work develops evolutionary theoretical models to understand what motivates societies to harshly suppress female sexuality. Her work also investigates how and why cultural factors can influence the type of men that heterosexual women are attracted to. She is particularly interested in the environmental triggers (e.g. socioeconomic, disease, income inequality) which promote sexual conservatism. Don’t Miss This Week’s Foreplay… News broke earlier this week that the Center for Disease Control released a list of seven words that would be “banned” from any rhetoric coming from the CDC. However, the director of the CDC has released clarification on the so-called “ban” stating that these words should not be used in budget proposals for Congress. The seven words are: fetus, diversity, vulnerable, transgender, entitlement, science-based, and evidence-based. A researcher in the psychology of sex has been found to have been fabricating studies. Dr. Nicolas Guéguen published several studies on such vital topics including whether women with larger breasts get more invitations to dance in nightclubs, whether women are more likely to give their phone number to a man if asked while walking near a flower shop, and whether a male busdriver is more likely to let a woman (but not a man) ride the bus for free if she touches him. It is not clear what will happen to this researcher. Read full article here. Afterglow A survey of 2,000 people on Plenty of Fish found that half of people polled admit they’ve previously kissed a co-worker at an office holiday party. This statistic is very interesting considering the ongoing conversation in the news about the fine line between flirtation and sexual harassment especially in the workplace. So how do we reckon with this type of romance? Read article discussed here.Facebook Twitter Google+PinterestLinkedIn0Shares

1hr 5mins

21 Dec 2017

Rank #8

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#32 – Porn Ed.

In episode 32, Dr. Zhana and Joe talk to Dr. Emily Rothman about the benefits of educating kids about porn. A new study reported on joint efforts by folks at Boston University and the Boston Public Health Commission to educate young people about pornography, in hopes that they would develop a more realistic understanding of what porn is, how it’s made, and how it relates to real-life sex and bodies. These programs have been proven to work and be extremely beneficial for young people. On this week’s episode we spoke to the lead author on this study, Dr. Emily Rothman. Read study discussed here! About Our Guest Emily F. Rothman, ScD, is a Professor at the Boston University School of Public Health with secondary appointments at the Boston University School of Medicine in Pediatrics and Emergency Medicine. She is also a visiting scientist at the Harvard Injury Control Research Center. Dr. Rothman has authored more than 80 publications that span the areas of intimate partner violence, sexual assault, human trafficking, firearm violence, and pornography. She has been a PI or co-investigator on numerous federal research grants from entities including the NIH and NIJ , and worked closely with multiple state sexual assault and domestic violence coalitions, state health departments, and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on issues related to sexual assault prevention. Dr. Rothman received her master’s and doctoral degrees in public health from Harvard University. Interested in incorporating porn literacy for teens in your school or youth group? Sign up for this June 30th training in Boston! This training is for teachers, counselors and youth workers who want to learn how to deliver this curriculum to youth in their locale. You can register on the website for this event here! Don’t Miss This Week’s Foreplay… A new study suggests that millennials are waiting longer to have sex with one in eight still virgins at the age of 26. This could be due to a “fear of intimacy” that is thought to be caused by social media. Many young people feel intense pressure due to the exposure of hyper-sexualized images in the mass media plus their own social media presence. Previous generations reported that one in 20 were virgins at this age. Read full article here!Facebook Twitter Google+PinterestLinkedIn0Shares

1hr 4mins

21 May 2018

Rank #9

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#49 – Bi Guys on the Down Low

The dangers and risks for gay men in coming out of the closet is widely acknowledged, but what about bisexual men? More bi men, compared to gay men, keep their sexuality strictly on the down low. Why is this the case? How are these men’s experience different? In Episode 49,  Dr. Zhana and Joe talk to Dr. Eric Schrimshaw from Columbia University about his research on bisexual men–especially those with long-term female partners–who remain in the closet and why they do so. Why would bisexual guys living in the 21st century in ultra-liberal New York City be so reticent about their sexual attractions/behaviors? Listen to the episode to find out! You can read the full study here. About our Guest Eric W. Schrimshaw, Ph.D., is a social/health psychologist and associate professor of sociomedical sciences at Columbia University Medical Center where he serves as co-Lead of the Sexuality, Sexual, and Reproductive Health certificate program. His research over the past 20 years has been in the area of LGB health, with a particular emphasis on HIV risk behaviors of MSM populations. In particular, he has an interest in the role of technology in changing how MSM meet and communicate with potential sexual partners and how this may contribute to sexual risk behaviors among MSM. His research has also addressed the unique psychological and sexual health needs of bisexual men, pornography viewers, male sex workers, and LGB adolescents. His research has been supported by multiple NIH grants and has resulted in the publication of over 60 journal articles addressing LGB health and well-being. You can visit his website here. Sex or Travel? Most Millennials Would Give Up the Former! A new study shows that some Millennials think travel is more important than sex. 57% of millennials said that they would give up sex for travel. This is consistent with other data we’ve been getting lately that millennials are having less sex and with fewer people than previous generations. Listen to find out if Dr. Zhana can pick between her two favorites, sex or travel? You can read the full article discussed here. Before Next Time… Remember to like The Science of Sex Podcast on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram! Check out Dr. Zhana on November 20th at her Think & Drink NYC series event at the bar Subject where she will be debunking some common myths about the female orgasm, learn while enjoying a drink! Come to enter a raffle to win a LELO Sona Cruise vibrator! Buy tickets here. On that note: Visit Lelo to fulfill your high-quality vibrator needs with a wide selection of vibrators for all! Use discount code SCIENCE to get 20% off on your new vibrating toy. Visit Adam & Eve and use promo code SCIENCE for 50% off just about any product. Plus 3 FREE adult DVDs, FREE mystery gift and FREE shipping. Remember to submit comments, questions, and everything in between on our Get in Touch Page! For more sex science articles, events and discussions please join our Science of Sex Facebook group! Do you love The Science of Sex Podcast and all the work Dr. Zhana does? Support her by becoming a monthly Patreon Supporter! Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn 93Shares

1hr 7mins

20 Nov 2018

Rank #10

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#27 – Inside the Mind of the Vagina Scientist (Encore)

This week, Dr. Zhana and Joe talk to “The Vagina Scientist.” Dr. Jim Pfaus and his team published an article attempting to resolve the controversy surrounding clitoral versus vaginal orgasms and we break it down in this episode of “The Science of Sex.”Facebook Twitter Google+PinterestLinkedIn0Shares

38mins

17 Apr 2018

Rank #11

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#28 – Sex-Question-Palooza: The Sequel

The episode is all about YOU! This week Dr. Zhana takes your sex questions! You hit us up online and on social media and now Zhana gives you her science based answers in the most Dr. Zhana kind of way.Facebook Twitter Google+PinterestLinkedIn0Shares

44mins

25 Apr 2018

Rank #12

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#9 – Is Porn Bad for Your Marriage?

Can porn negatively impact a marriage? This week on The Science of Sex, Joe and Dr. Zhana went deeper into a rather controversial topic involving the impact that watching pornography can have on marital quality and longevity. They interviewed Dr. Samuel L. Perry, an assistant professor of sociology and religious studies at the University of Oklahoma, about two of his recent studies, both of which included nationally representative samples of married US adults that were followed over several years. One study, published in the Archives of Sexual Behavior, found married persons who watched porn more often in 2006 reported significantly lower levels of marital quality 6 years later in 2012, after controlling for initial levels of marital quality and other relevant factors. The second study, published in the Journal of Sex Research, found that the probability of divorce roughly doubled for married Americans who started watching porn in the 2-year period between the two survey waves, while discontinuing pornography use between survey waves was associated with a lower probability of divorce, though only for women. So not only was porn use linked to lower marital satisfaction, but also actual divorce. Read study discussed here. About Our Guest For more of Dr. Perry’s work, you can read his book, Growing God’s Family: The Global Orphan Care Movement and the Limits of Evangelical Activism, in which explores American evangelical activism surrounding adoption and foster care. He is currently finishing a second book on how pornography shapes the lives of American evangelicals. Don’t Miss This Week’s Foreplay… We warmed up with a little Foreplay about the latest accusations of sexual assault in the media. TV host and sports broadcaster Leeann Tweeden accused Senator Al Franken of groping her in her sleep on a 2006 USO tour, and Terry Crews publicly named Adam Venit, the high-powered talent agent, he claims groped him at an industry party. On a more positive note, Germany’s highest court ruled that the nation’s government must introduce a third gender for the categorization of people who do not identify as either male or female, or are born with ambiguous sexual anatomy. The decision by the Federal Constitutional Court means that the legislature must add the new status to all civil documents, or dispense with gender identification altogether. Read full article here. Afterglow We closed this weeks episode with some Afterglow about infidelity. In her new book State of Affairs: Rethinking Infidelity, Esther Perel says that since the 90s, the rate of married women who have cheated has increased by 40 per cent. The rates among men, however, have not changed. Speaking of cheating, a new study has pinpointed exactly when such behavior is most-likely to occur in a marriage. Published in the Journal of Sex Research, the data reveals women are most likely to cheat between six and ten years of being in a relationship, and men are most likely to do so after 11 years. Rethinking Infidelity When is cheating likely to happenFacebook Twitter Google+PinterestLinkedIn0Shares

59mins

21 Nov 2017

Rank #13

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#26 – Pedophilia Explained

In episode 26, Things got a little heavy in this episode where we talked to James Cantor about his research on pedophilia. We often think of pedophilia as a sexual attraction towards minors, but that’s actually not true. Western culture has become accustomed to viewing anyone under the age of 18 as a child, however biologically “children” become “adults” at a much earlier age. On average, puberty occurs between the ages of 10 and 14 for girls and 12 and 16 for boys. While boys and girls can reach sexual maturity before the age of 18, we, as a culture, have decided that, on average, children reach a certain emotional maturity around 18. However, different states have agreed upon various ages for when a minor can consent to sexual activity. We often make the mistake of viewing adults who have sex with people under the age of 18 as pedophiles, but it’s actually a lot more complicated. So we spoke to Dr. James Cantor about his extensive research regarding pedophilia. About Our Guest Dr. James Cantor is a clinical psychologist and sexual behavior scientist, studying the nature and causes of sexual interests—from heterosexuality and homosexuality to rare and exotic desires from sexual fantasies of being swallowed to people who have sex while dressed or cross-dressed as animals. He and his team have used a wide range of neuroscientific techniques to examine pedophilia and its potential causes. Their results have shown that having a sexual interest in children is not a result of suffering sexual abuse in one’s own childhood, as generally believed, but an innate characteristic of neurological origin, like a sexual orientation. The implications of his team’s work have gained international interest, including his appearances on CNN, the BBC, and Dan Savage’s column Savage Love to discuss how society can better improve child safety and provide ethical treatment for atypical sexual interests.Facebook Twitter Google+PinterestLinkedIn0Shares

1hr 6mins

11 Apr 2018

Rank #14

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#37 – The Good, The Bad, and Polyamory

In episode 35, Dr. Zhana and Joe talk to Dr. Amy C. Moors about her research on non-monogamy! Non-monogamy often gets a bad rep in our society, but also in academia. A lot of research conducted on polyamory has been biased, showing stigma even among researchers. Hence, this makes it difficult to have clear and accurate statistics about non-monogamy and open relationships. Thankfully, there are some studies out there that attempt to analyze this bias and why it occurs. About Our Guest Amy C. Moors, is the Director of the Social Science Research and Evaluation Program at Purdue University’s College of Engineering and a Research Fellow at Indiana University’s Kinsey Institute. This fall she’s honored to join Chapman University’s Department of Psychology as an assistant professor. She earned a Ph.D. in Psychology and Women’s Studies from the University of Michigan. Dr. Moors’s research addresses the impact of bias on people’s well-being and satisfaction in intimate and professional contexts. In one line of research, she studies diverse expressions of sexuality. In her other line of research, she examines strategies for promoting equity in higher education. Dr. Moors has published more than 40 articles and chapters related to gender, sexuality, close relationships, and social inequalities. Recently, she was recognized by the Society for the Scientific Study of Sexuality as a “Rising Scholar.” Don’t Miss This Week’s Foreplay… SKYN Condoms unveiled a new survey of 4000 people designed to analyze the behaviors, attitudes and preferences of sexually active millennials. Despite what people may claim, there is still heavy stigma against women who have multiple sexual partners. Also, fewer millennials are using dating apps, and women are (still) more likely to fake an orgasm versus men. Finally, it showed that older millennials are getting kinky – using toys like anal beads, handcuffs, and whips in bed.Facebook Twitter Google+PinterestLinkedIn0Shares

1hr 10mins

25 Jun 2018

Rank #15

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#8 – What happens to women’s brains when they orgasm?

What is really going on in the female brain before, during, and after an orgasm? This week, Joe and Dr. Zhana talk to Dr. Nan Wise, who published a study in the Journal of Sexual Medicine that disputed past research of brain scans of women during orgasm. Originally, researchers found deactivation of brain regions leading up to or during orgasm, but this recent study found that this might not be true. Instead, across 10 female participants that were either masturbating or being stimulated by their male partners while in the fMRI machine, brain activity gradually increased leading up to orgasm, peaked at orgasm, and then decreased. The activated brain regions included sensory, motor, reward, frontal cortical, and brainstem regions. About Our Guest Dr. Nan Wise, a licensed psychotherapist, cognitive neuroscientist, certified sex therapist, board certified clinical hypnotherapist, and certified relationship specialist with three decades of experience. Her research at Rutgers University has addressed gaps in the scientific literature regarding the neural basis of human sexuality, and has as a result, garnered international attention. Don’t Miss This Week’s Foreplay… Everyone is talking about allegations made against Louis C.K. by five women. The comedian issued an apology, but top networks, including FX, Netflix, TBS, and HBO, have cut ties with him, and The Orchard, the distribution company for his film, I Love You, Daddy, dropped the film just one week before its scheduled release. We also touched on the allegations made against Roy Moore, the Senate candidate from Alabama. The Washington Post reported that a woman claims that Roy Moore had sexual contact with her when she was 14 years old and he was a 32-year-old district attorney in 1979. Three other women told the Post that Moore, who’s now 70, pursued them when they were teenagers, one of them 16, another 17 and another 18, and he was in his early 30s. Finally, according to a new study, you shouldn’t be fooled by the movie and TV scenes through the years where a character dies from a heart attack during sex. There’s almost NO CHANCE it’s going to happen to you. Doctors studied 4,557 cases of sudden cardiac arrest between 2002 and 2015. And they found that only 34 of those happened during sex or within an hour afterward. That’s 0.7%. And only two of the 4,557 cases were women. Read article discussed here. Afterglow Harvard’s annual “Anal Sex 101” class, is a class where participants got to learn the ins and outs of anal sex. The class instructor Natasha told the future leaders of America, “Not all men have penises, not all women have vaginas … the butthole is the great sexual equalizer. All humans have a butthole…” We couldn’t agree more! Read more here.Facebook Twitter Google+PinterestLinkedIn0Shares

56mins

16 Nov 2017

Rank #16

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#52 – Hot for Teacher

What is it about teachers that make them so hot? According to the popular college professor reviewing website, Rate My Professors, it’s more than just looks. But how does their rating system work? How are female professors rated versus their male peers? In Episode 52, Dr. Zhana and Joe talk to New York University professor Pascal Wallisch about how students rate and tag their favorite (or not-so-favorite) professors on the divisive yet popular website, Rate My Professors. Does the site enable students to label their professors in a way that affirms gender stereotypes? And while Dr. Zhana and Pascal savor their hot pepper status, some professors would prefer that not to be a factor. Also— do you know the difference between a psychopath and a sociopath? Pascal provides us with some more info on the 1% of the population who is psychopathic and answers the first question on our minds— do they have sex? Tune in to learn more! About our Guest Pascal Wallisch serves as clinical assistant professor at New York University, heading the Fox lab. Pascal received a PhD in Psychology from the University of Chicago. Wallisch’s main research interests lie at the intersection of neuroscience, psychology, and data science. Pascal co-founded the “Neural Data Science” summer course at CSHL and wrote several books on the analysis of data in neuroscience. Pascal’s efforts were recognized with the “Golden dozen” teaching award by NYU. Before Next Time… Remember to like The Science of Sex Podcast on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram! Also check Dr. Zhana out on December 11th at The V Club where she teams up with one of our favorite researchers, Dr. Justin Lehmiller, to discuss one of our most popular topics: gender differences in sexuality. RSVP to The Mars/Venus Debate: Are Men and Women Really That Different When It Comes to Sex? here. Visit Lelo to fulfill your high-quality vibrator needs with a wide selection of vibrators for all! Use discount code SCIENCE to get 20% off on your new vibrating toy. Visit Adam & Eve and use promo code SCIENCE for 50% off just about any product. Plus 3 FREE adult DVDs, FREE mystery gift and FREE shipping. Remember to submit comments, questions, and everything in between on our Get in Touch Page! For more sex science articles, events and discussions please join our Science of Sex Facebook group! Do you love The Science of Sex Podcast and all the work Dr. Zhana does? Support her by becoming a monthly Patreon Supporter!Facebook Twitter Google+PinterestLinkedIn35Shares

53mins

11 Dec 2018

Rank #17

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#29 – How KINKY is too KINKY?

In episode 29, Dr. Zhana and Joe talk to Dr. Christian Joyal about some of the more common (and uncommon) kinks and fetishes. Paraphilia is defined as a condition characterized by abnormal sexual desires, typically involving extreme or dangerous activities. While this definition might draw some immediate conclusions, various paraphilias are very common, such as BDSM/kink, while others are more rare. On this week’s episode we spoke with Dr. Christian Joyal on his research on paraphilia and uncommon sexual interests. Links to studies discussed in the episode: What exactly is an unusual sexual fantasy? The Prevalence of Paraphilic Interests How anomalous are paraphilic interests? About Our Guest Christian Joyal, Ph.D., is doctor in neuropsychology, full professor at the University of Quebec, co-director of the International Center of Comparative Criminology and associate researcher at the Philippe-Pinel Institute of Montreal. His main research interests concern the neuroimaging of sexual arousal and sexual deviance, the definition of “normal” sexuality and paraphilias, as well as motives and origins of BDSM proclivities.Facebook Twitter Google+PinterestLinkedIn0Shares

52mins

1 May 2018

Rank #18

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#40 – How Sex Affects Your Immune System

In Episode 40, Dr. Zhana and Joe talk with Tierney Lorenz on sex and the immune system! It’s been known that sexual activity can have an effect on the immune system. What do those effects look like? A healthy sex life can be great for the immune system which can in turn increase things like sex drive or pleasure. On this week’s episode we were able to talk to Dr. Tierney Lorenz on her research on sex and the immune system! About our Guest Dr. Lorenz received her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of Texas at Austin after completing an internship at the University of Washington School of Medicine. She completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the Kinsey Institute and the Center for the Integrative Study of Animal Behavior at Indiana University. Currently, she is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at the University of Nebraska, and a member of the Center for Brain, Biology and Behavior. Dr. Lorenz’s research examines the interaction between women’s mental, physical and sexual health. The Women, Immunity and Sexual Health (WISH) lab investigates the ways that sexual behavior impact women’s immune and endocrine function, as well as ways to help women with mental and/or physical health conditions have happy, healthy sexual lives. Don’t miss this week’s foreplay… New Supreme Court Justice, Brett Kavanaugh, recently said that certain forms of birth control were “abortion inducing.” Let’s get the facts straight: this is entirely untrue. The pill prevents the body from ovulating (the process of releasing eggs) so that sperm cannot meet with an egg. Even Plan B (otherwise known as the morning after pill) acts as a large dose of birth control to do the exact same thing. The package even specifies that Plan B will not work if sperm has already found its way to an egg. Bottom line is science does NOT say that birth control induces abortion, so try again, Kavanaugh! Read more here. Before Next Time… Remember to like The Science of Sex Podcast on Facebook, Twitter, and check out our website at scienceofsexpodcast.com! Check out Dr. Zhana’s next event: Debunking Sex Myths That Ruin Lives, on October 18th. She will be discussing some common myths that get pushed around that can be detrimental to relationships! Click here to reserve your tickets for the event! Remember to submit comments, questions, and everything in between on our Get in Touch Page! Do you love The Science of Sex Podcast and all the work Dr. Zhana does? Support her by becoming a monthly Patreon Supporter!Facebook Twitter Google+PinterestLinkedIn16Shares

55mins

18 Sep 2018

Rank #19

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#41 – Sex-Question-Palooza III

This week, Joe and Dr. Zhana switched things up and decided to dedicate an entire episode to answering some of your questions! Dr. Zhana gives science based answers to listener’s most pressing questions while Joe chimes in with some witty banter and some of his own questions. This week’s episode covered a range of topics including, vaginismus, open relationships, gooning, non surgical penis enhancement, and more! Before Next Time… Remember to like The Science of Sex Podcast on Facebook, Twitter, and check out our website at scienceofsexpodcast.com! Check out Dr. Zhana’s next event: Debunking Sex Myths That Ruin Lives, on October 18th. She will be discussing some common myths that get pushed around that can be detrimental to relationships! Click here to reserve your tickets for the event! Remember to submit comments, questions, and everything in between on our Get in Touch Page! Do you love The Science of Sex Podcast and all the work Dr. Zhana does? Support her by becoming a monthly Patreon Supporter!Facebook Twitter Google+PinterestLinkedIn2Shares

51mins

25 Sep 2018

Rank #20