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Life of the Law

Law is alive. It doesn’t live in books and words. It thrives in how well we understand and apply it to everyday life. We ask questions, find answers, and publish what we discover in feature episodes and live storytelling.

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99: Shaken

Tonia Miller lost control and shook her baby to death. That’s what prosecutors said. Miller denied it, but a Michigan jury wasn’t convinced and convicted her of murder. At 19 years old, Miller was separated from her family, sent to prison and found herself having lost something else: her life.Over 13 years later, those who knew the young family are haunted by moments when the child showed signs something was wrong during the short time she was alive. According to medical experts, authorities may have foreclosed the possibility that the death was the result of something other than murder—birth trauma, an accident or illness.  This shaken-baby syndrome investigation was reported by The Medill Justice Project, an award-winning national investigative journalism center based at Northwestern University that examines potentially wrongful convictions and criminal justice issues.Production NotesShaken was a co-production with The Medill Justice Project and was reported by Adele Humbert and Taylor Mullaney with production by Adele Humbert and editing by Alec Klein and Amanda Westrich. Our Senior Producer is Tony Gannon. Our Post Production Editors are Kirsten Jusewicz-Haidle and Rachael Cain.We want to thank Allisha Azlan and Rachel Fobar, Medill Justice Project associates, and Anthony Settipani, former Medill Justice Project fellow for their help with the reporting and production of our story.  Our engineers were Adam Yoffe at WBEZ in Chicago and Howard Gelman at KQED Radio in San Francisco.  Music in this episode was from The Audio Network. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

32mins

20 Dec 2016

Rank #1

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102: Radio Silenced

In April of 2014, federal agents raided the studios of 106.1 TOUCH FM in Boston, Massachusetts. They took turntables, microphones, transmitters, pretty much everything. The reason was simple: the radio station was operating without a license. But that raises questions: could the owner get a license? If not, why not? And why did he need one in the first place?Just because something’s law, doesn't make it right. I like to call us the Rosa Parks of radio. The Harriet Tubman of radio. The Nat Turner of radio. The Malcolm X of radio. Everyone deserves a voice.-- Charles ClemonsThis is a story about how radio regulation has evolved over its one-hundred year history, and whose interests that regulation serves. It is also a story of media diversity -- of two independent and black-owned radio stations that once broadcast on Boston’s airwaves, but have been silenced.Finally, it is the story of Greg Lawson -- a man who always keeps the radio on, and listened as the stations he depended on disappeared, one after the other.Suggested ReadingThe Titanic’s Role in Radio ReformUnlicensed Grove Hall radio station shutteredRich Media, Poor Democracy: Communication Politics in Dubious TimesA Political-Economic History of FCC Policy on Minority Broadcast OwnershipProduction NotesRadio Silenced was reported and produced by Ian Coss and edited by Nancy Mullane, Life of the Law's Executive Producer. The story's Senior Producer was Tony Gannon. Our Post Production Editors are Kirsten Jusewicz-Haidle and Rachael Cain.We want to thank Jason Loviglio, Chair and Associate Professor of Media and Communication Studies at the University of Maryland for sharing his scholarship. Professor Loviglio is the author of Radio’s Intimate Public: Network Broadcasting and Mass-Mediated Democracy.Our engineer was Howard Gelman of KQED Radio in San Francisco. Music in this episode was composed and produced by Ian Coss.Transcript of Radio Silence Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

44mins

7 Feb 2017

Rank #2

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106: Mother and Son

Prison is a walled off, secret world, where inmates and officers live a sort of altered reality. For the past 10 years Life of the Law's Executive Producer, Nancy Mullane, has been reporting on the people inside San Quentin State Prison in Northern California and over those years, some of the men she's been reporting on have themselves become journalists -- writing print stories for the San Quentin News and producing audio stories for the San Quentin Prison Report, stories told by reporters rom the unique perspective of life inside prison looking out, rather than from the perspective of free journalists outside looking in.One day after a meeting of the Society of Professional Journalists San Quentin, reporter Greg Eskridge mentioned he was going to miss the next Sunday meeting. He said his mom was coming to San Quentin for a visit.  How long had he been in prison, Mullane asked? More than 21 years. He said he was sent to prison at the age of 19 after being convicted of murder, attempted murder and assault with a deadly weapon and sentenced to 65 years-to-life, and two life terms.What’s it like to be a teenager sent to prison for what may be forever, and what’s it like to be his mom?Our story is Mother and Son.Production NotesMother and Son was reported by Nancy Mullane and produced by our Senior Producer, Tony Gannon.Our Post Production Editors are Kirsten Jusewicz-Haidle and Rachael Cain.Our engineer was Howard Gelman of KQED Radio in San Francisco. Music in this episode was composed and produced by Ian Coss.Transcript of Mother and SonThis episode of Life of the Law was funded in part by grants from the Open Society Foundations, the Law and Society Association, and the National Science Foundation.© Copyright 2017 Life of the Law. All rights reserved. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

37mins

5 Apr 2017

Rank #3

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92: Live Law Phoenix - Borders

Each summer, people from all around the country gather for the Soros Justice Fellowship Conference -- three days of meetings, conversations, and workshops by scholars, journalists, attorneys, and advocates working on projects that explore the criminal justice system in America.This year six fellows, some new and some former, shared personal stories about their work and their lives. It was hosted by Adam Culbreath, Program Officer of the Soros Justice Fellows Program. Here are their stories…  PRODUCTION NOTESLive Law Phoenix - Borders was held at summer gathering of the Soros Justice Fellows. We’d like to thank Adam Culbreath, Program Officer of the Soros Justice Fellowship, for hosting and Christina Voight, Program Coordinator, for her co-production of the event. Jonathan Hirsch designed the sound. Our post-production editors are Kirsten Jusewicz Haidle and Rachael Cain. Howard Gelman was our engineer.Music in this episode was from Martin Landh Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

43mins

20 Sep 2016

Rank #4

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133: In-Studio: Police, Race and Fatal Force

Mothers, brothers, sons and daughters in cities across the country are suffering from the loss of a loved one to police use of fatal force. In 2017 The Washington Post reports police officers in the United States shot and killed 987 people. Sixty eight of them, men and women, some of them teenagers like Tony Robinson, were unarmed when they were shot and killed by police officers. The county with highest number of police shootings per capita in the country, is right here in Kern County in California. Last year, police in Los Angeles shot more than three times the number of people shot by police in New York City, even though NY has one-fourth as many officers.What is the law on the police use of lethal force? Is there a way, under the law, to prevent these deaths from happening in the future?This week, Life of the Law's team meets up in the studios of KQED in San Francisco to talk about our most recent episode, DEATH BY POLICE: A MOTHER'S (AUDIO) DIARY and officer use of fatal force.In-Studio Team:• Osagie Obasogie, Professor at the UC Berkeley School of Public Health and a Member of Life of the Law’s Advisory Board• Tony Gannon, Life of the Law’s Senior Producer• Troy Williams, Founder of the San Quentin Prison Report and RISE Coordinator at Chabot College.• And joining us from the studios of KQED in Sacramento, Lizzie Buchen, Legislative Advocate for the ACLU of California’s Center for Advocacy and Policy.Production Notes:IN-STUDIO: POLICE, RACE AND FATAL FORCE was produced by Tony Gannon and Andrea Hendrickson. Nancy Mullane is Executive Producer. Rachael Cain is our Social-Media Editor. Katie McMurran was our engineer at KQED in San Francisco. Katie Orr engineered from KQED studios in Sacramento.Special thanks to Lizzie Buchen, Legislative Advocate with the ACLU California’s Center for Advocacy and Policy and Troy Williams, Founder of the San Quentin Prison Report and RISE Coordinator at Chabot College for joining us In-Studio.Life of the Law is a non-profit project of the Tides Center and we’re part of the Panoply Network of Podcasts from Slate. You can also find Life of the Law on PRX, Public Radio Exchange. Visit our website, Life of the Law.org and make a very much appreciated donation to help cover the costs of producing this feature episode. © Copyright 2018 Life of the Law. All rights reserved. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

47mins

17 Apr 2018

Rank #5

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109: Unequal Protection - Pt. 2

Last time on Life of the Law we presented Unequal Protection - Part 1, the story of Warren McCleskey’s unsuccessful appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court. McCleskey argued that his death sentence by the state of Georgia had been prejudiced by the color of skin and that he had not been given equal protection under the law as guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution.Walking into the prison, I was the first one. I walked in and his lawyers were walking toward me.  I was looking at them and I said, 'What’s wrong?' They said, Tthey denied him.' And I just dropped to the floor. Just screaming and crying and like, they didn’t even take time to think this through. They really gonna kill my dad.-- Carla McCleskeyThis week, we present Part 2 of Sarah Marshall’s report on Warren’s McCleskey’s life after the Supreme Court ruling and his execution on September 25, 1991 by the state of Georgia.Production NotesUnequal Protection was reported by Sarah Marshall, edited by Nancy Mullane, and produced by our Senior Producer, Tony Gannon. Our Post Production Editors are Kirsten Jusewicz-Haidle and Rachael Cain.Our engineers were Paul Ruet of Argot Studios in San Francisco and Katie McMurran of KQED Radio in San Francisco. Music in this episode was composed and produced by Ian Coss.Transcript of Unequal Protection: Part 2This episode of Life of the Law was funded in part by grants from the Open Society Foundations, the Law and Society Association, and the National Science Foundation.© Copyright 2017 Life of the Law. All rights reserved. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

35mins

23 May 2017

Rank #6

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114: Inside San Quentin - To Be Heard

It's been more than 45 years since a thousand inmates at Attica Prison (Correctional Facility) in New York took control of the prison. In her 2017 Pulitzer Prize winning book, Blood in the Water: The Attica Prison Uprising of 1971 and its Legacy, Professor Heather Thompson pieces "together the whole, gripping story, from the conditions that gave rise to the rebellion, which cost the lives of 43 men, to the decades of government obstructionism that prevented the full story from being told." (NYTimes) If you listened to our most recent Episode 114: In-Studio-Locking People Up, you know we're talking about the fact that more than 2.2 million people are locked up in America's prisons and jails. We invited scholars who have spent their professional lives researching and reporting on this crisis of incarceration, and a man who was incarcerated in California for more than 20 years, to join us in the studios of KQED in San Francisco to talk about how we got here and what it would take to make a safe and humane society.Immediately after our conversation at KQED, Troy Williams and scholars Rebecca McClennan, Keramet Reiter, Ashley Rubin and Heather Thompson drove to San Quentin State Prison about an hour away, to go inside the prison for a round-table (recorded) discussion with men locked up, to talk about their right to be heard and to protest behind the walls.We begin with an introduction by Shadeed Wallce Stepter, producer of this episode, a reporter with the San Quentin Prison Report and Chair of the San Quentin Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

51mins

25 Jul 2017

Rank #7

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Behind the Walls of the Most Restricted Cells

In California, there is one place where people considered to be the most dangerous inmates are incarcerated, it’s called the Security Housing Unit at Pelican Bay State Prison. Life of the Law Executive Producer, Nancy Mullane, pushes for access to this prison’s most restricted cells and to the people who are living inside them. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

28mins

17 Nov 2012

Rank #8

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4: Law in Translation

Vietnamese fishing communities are still finding themselves grounded by the BP oil spill, one of the largest environmental disasters of the century. These fishermen and women are without adequate interpretation services and legal representation and are having a hard time keeping afloat. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

13mins

16 Oct 2012

Rank #9

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3: Two Sides of a River

Sometimes what’s considered as socially acceptable behavior can also be technically unlawful. Reporter Jason Albert follows one city as it grapples with how to enforce laws in a public park without unnecessarily restricting public use Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

18mins

2 Oct 2012

Rank #10

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124: Traditions

Traditions. We all have them. Some good and, well, some not so good. Think for a minute. When you were a kid, what were your holiday traditions? Do you still follow some of them today? Put up lights? Bake special cookies or visit relatives? What if the law makes it impossible to follow your traditions?More than two million Americans will spend the holidays locked up in a jail or prison. In the Bay Area, volunteers spend a few hours inside San Quentin State Prison's cell blocks singing holiday songs with the men. It's an annual tradition.What's it like to spend years of your adult life in prison over the holidays?From inside San Quentin State Prison, join Shadeed Wallace Stepter, Rahsaan Thomas, and Emile DeWeaver as they share memories of holidays when they were free, and how, over the years, they have created new traditions, to celebrate the holidays behind prison walls.Emile DeWeaver Secretary of the San Quentin Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists and reporter for Prison Renaissance, and a contributing opinion writer for San Jose Mercury Newsand Easy Street Magazine. Rashaan Thomas Vice-Chair of the San Quentin Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists and reporter with Prison Renaissance,The San Quentin News, and a contributing reporter for The Marshall Project. Shadeed Wallace-StepterChair of the San Quentin Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists, a reporter with the San Quentin Prison Report, and a TEDX presenter. Listen to TRADITIONSVisit our website www.lifeofthelaw.org or listen to all 124 episodes on iTunes. And send us your thoughts on this episode to connect@lifeofthelaw.org. Production Notes:Inside San Quentin: Traditions — was produced by Shadeed Wallace-Stepter, Rashaan Thomas and Emile DeWeaver.  Life of the Law's Senior Producer is Tony Gannon. Our Post Production Editors are Kirsten Jusewicz-Haidle and Rachael Cain. Music in this episode was recorded by Life of the Law's Executive Producer, Nancy Mullane. The song  'Keep It On The Real' (Instrumental) by 3X Krazy is used in the introduction and end credits and is referenced by Emile DeWeaver. Rob Speight was our engineer at the studios of KQED in San Francisco. This episode of Life of the Law was funded in part by donations from our listeners, and by grants from theLaw and Society Association, and theNational Science Foundation. © Copyright 2017 Life of the Law. All rights reserved.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

41mins

12 Dec 2017

Rank #11

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117: The Gift & Curse of Music

As a child, Serge Turnier fell in love with the sounds of the carnival bands that would pass near his house in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Now one of the top music producers in the country, Turnier is faced with the reality that Haitian law offers little protection for music copyrights and he must decide whether to quit the music business altogether, in order to provide financial security for his family.A musician is not even recognized as a real job here in Haiti. You're just nothing in eye of the law.  -- Serge Turnier, music producer and composer in HaitiOne of the basic jobs of every government is to protect property rights, meaning if you own this piece of land or you build this house, no one can just come and take those things from you. Property rights are pretty clear cut when it comes to things – like land and houses – but less so when it comes to ideas. Can someone really own an image, or own a song? Here in the United States, the answer is yes, absolutely. But that isn’t the case everywhere.The Gift and Curse of Music - Haiti’s Fight for Copyright - is the story of Serge Turnier, a music producer and composer in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Just last year, he produced a half dozen carnival songs himself, working with top artists in the Haitian music industry. But what he didn’t realize in his childhood dreams, was that Haitian law does not protect copyrights for songs, making it almost impossible to make money from recorded music.Suggested Reading and Viewing: Democracy of Sound, Music Piracy and the Remaking of American Copyright in the Twentieth Century, Alex Sayf CummingsGood Copy, Bad Copy (2007) Copyright and Culture, The Documentary NetworkThe Gift and Curse of Music - Haiti’s fight for Copyright, was reported and produced by Ian Coss. Tony Gannon and Nancy Mullane co-edited the story. Our Senior Producer is Tony Gannon. Our Post Production Editors are Kirsten Jusewicz-Haidle and Rachael Cain. Jim Bennett at KQED Radio in San Francisco was our engineer.Original music in this episode was composed by Ian Coss, with additional music provided by Powersurge. Special thanks to the the organization Ayiti Mizik, which supported our research on the Haitian copyright system and to the podcast Afropop Worldwide who co-produced this episode with Life of the Law. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

39mins

5 Sep 2017

Rank #12

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113: In Studio

America is a nation that locks up more people per capita than any other country in the world.  The Sentencing Project reports 2.2 million people are incarcerated in America's prisons. That's a 500% increase over the past 40 years. The Institute for Criminal Policy Research in London reports America locks up 670 people per 100,000. Russia locks up 439 per 100,000. Rwanda 434 per 100,000. China 118 per 100,000. How in the world did this happen? Are Americans criminally prone? Or has America's desire for security and tough sentencing policies lost its way?This week on Life of the Law we ask scholars who have studied the history and changing conditions of prisons, and a man who was incarcerated for more than 20 years, to join us in the studios of KQED in San Francisco -- to talk about the social, financial and cultural impact of mass incarceration and what change would look like. Osagie Obasogieis Professor, School of Public Health, UC Berkeley, author of Blinded by Sight: Seeing Race through the Eyes of the Blind and is a member of Life of the Law's Advisory Board  Ashley Rubinis Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Toronto and is author of the soon to be published book, The Deviant Prison: Eastern State Penitentiary and the Advantage of Difference, 1829-913.  Keramet Reiter is Assistant Professor of Criminology, Law and Society and Law at UC Irvine and is author of 23/7: Pelican Bay Prison and the Rise of Long-Term Solitary Confinement. Keramet Reiter has a forthcoming book with Oxford Press, Keynotes in Criminology and Criminal Justice: Mass Incarceration (2017).  She is currently conducting research in Danish prisons, about prison culture and solitary confinement practices, and in Washington State, about solitary confinement reforms.http://cls.soceco.uci.edu/Troy Williamsis a journalist and the new editor of SF Bay View and while incarcerated founded the San Quentin Prison Report.Rebecca McClennanis Associate Professor of History at UC Berkeley and is author of Becoming America: A History for the 21st Century and The Crisis of Imprisonment: Protest, Politics and the Making of the American Penal State, 1776-1941.Heather Ann Thompsonis Professor of History at the University of Michigan and won the 2017 Pulitzer Prize in History for her book Blood in the Water: The Attica Prison Uprising of 1971 and its Legacy.Please visit our website: www.lifeofthelaw.org for suggested supplemental reading© Copyright 2017 Life of the Law. All rights reserved. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

1hr 12mins

11 Jul 2017

Rank #13

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121: In-Studio - Brutally Ruthless

"As incompetent and bumbling as the Trump Administration has been in so many areas, they have been brutally ruthless on immigration." -- Jose Chito Vela, Immigration Attorney and Candidate for Texas State LegislatureIt’s been a year since the Presidential election of 2016 and the night the world turned upside down and inside out. Polls showed Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton ahead by a solid margin. But by the end of the night, the networks had declared Donald Trump the next President of the United States.Now, one year later, the Trump Presidency is in turmoil. On Monday, October 30, Paul Manafort, Trump’s former campaign chairperson was indicted by a Federal Grand Jury on charges of tax evasion, submitting false statements, and illegally laundering more than 18 million dollars. The most serious charge of money laundering carries a possible prison sentence of up to 20 years. It was also reported on Monday, that George Papadopoulos, one of Trump’s campaign advisers, had plead guilty back in July to lying to the FBI about his contact with a Russian professor who had ties to the Russian Government.The charges in Washington are disturbing, but President Trump continues to hold the highest office in the land, with the power to enforce his campaign promise to rid the US of undocumented immigrants. On September 5, Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced an end to the DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) program, but said they would give Congress six months to try and save the policy.In our most recent episode, Life UnDACAmented, we presented an update on our January 2016 story about a young man who came to the US as a child and had taken his fight for DACA status to the immigration courts.  You a find the audio on itunes, or on our websitelifeofthelaw.org.This week, our team goes IN-STUDIO with Jose "Chito" Vela, the young  man's immigration attorney and now candidate for the Texas State Legislature, to talk about immigration, DACA, and life in America one year into the Trump Presidency.Joining Chito Vela are Life of the Law's team Brittny Bottorff, Attorney with the Mayor Law Group and Chair of our Advisory Board; Tony Gannon, Life of the Law’s Senior Producer; Nancy Mullane, Life of the Law’s Executive Producer and host; and Osagie Obasogie Professsor at UC Berkeley’s School of Public Health.Production Notes:Brutally Ruthless was produced by Tony Gannon. Our Post Production Editors are Kirsten Jusewicz-Haidle and Rachael Cain. Music in this episode was by Ian Coss. Katie McMurran was our engineer at the studios of KQED in San Francisco. David Alvarez was our engineer at the studios of KUT in Austin.This episode of Life of the Law was funded in part by grants from the Law and Society Association, and theNational Science Foundation.© Copyright 2017 Life of the Law. All rights reserved. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

56mins

31 Oct 2017

Rank #14

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107: In Studio

Welcome to In-Studio from Life of the Law. This week we're talking about our most recent episode Mother and Son, the role of corporal punishment in the house, and the recent United Airlines situation.Each month we present an investigative feature report and two weeks later our team -- a scholar, journalist, producer, and attorney -- meet up in the studios of KQED in San Francisco to talk about our investigative reports, the law in the news, and the law on our minds. Join us for this month's In-Studio conversation:Brittny Bottorff  Attorney and Chair of LOTL Advisory BoardKirsten Jusewicz-Haidle  LOTL's Post-Production EditorNancy Mullane  LOTL's Executive Producer and HostOsagie Obasogie  Scholar and LOTL Advisory Board MemberHave a story or a question about the law you'd like us to bring to our next In Studio? Send us an email at connect@lifeofthelaw.org.Stories we're talking about...or want to talk about:Each time our team meets up In-Studio, we bring stories that are in the news and on our minds -- that we want to talk about, and get help sorting out.We don't have time to discuss all of the stories on the table, but we're sharing them with you:'Raise the Age,’ Now Law in New York, Is Still a Subject of DebateRaise the Age, NYSpanking and crime ratesDoes Outlawing Spanking Lower The Crime Rate Years Later?The Influence of Corporal Punishment on CrimeProduction NotesLife of the Law In-Studio: Mother and Son was produced by Nancy Mullane, Life of the Law's Executive Producer and our Senior Producer, Tony Gannon. Our Post Production Editors are Kirsten Jusewicz-Haidle and Rachael Cain.We want to thank our Advisory Board Members Brittny Bottorff and Osagie Obasogie for joining us In-Studio.Our engineer was Katie McMurran of KQED Radio in San Francisco. Music in this episode was composed by Ian Coss.© Copyright 2017 Life of the Law. All rights reserved. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

49mins

19 Apr 2017

Rank #15

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118: In Studio - Global Intellectual Property

All over the world people create. Music, art, literature. But is their creative work protected? Sure there are international copyright laws, but are they enforced? And if not, what then? This week our team took to the studio for a discussion to sort out global culture and international copyright law. If you haven't yet listened to our most recent feature episode GIFT AND CURSE OF MUSIC - Haiti's Fight for Copyright by reporter and composer Ian Coss, take a minute to hit the play button.Then come back and join us for our in-studio discussion on the incentives and rewards of international and national copyright law.Tony Gannon  Senior ProducerNancy Mullane  Executive Director/ProducerOsagie Obasogie  Professor at UC Berkeley's School of Public Health, author of Blinded by Sight: Seeing Race through the Eyes of the Blind, and a member of Life of the Law's Advisory Board.Madhavi Sunder  Professor of Law at UC Davis and author of From Goods to a Good Life - Intellectual Property and Global JusticeProduction Notes:In-Studio: Global Intellectual Property was edited and produced by Tony Gannon. Special thanks to Tony Gannon and Osagie Obasogie for joining us at KQED studios in San Francisco, and Madhavi Sunder for joining us from the studio of UC Davis for our discussion. Katie McMurran and Howard Gelman engineered the In-Studio at KQED and Tim Kerbavaz engineered from the studio of UC Davis.Our post production editors are Kirsten Jusewicz-Haidle and Rachael Cain.  Music in this episode was composed by Ian Coss.This episode of Life of the Law was funded in part by grants from theLaw and Society Association, and theNational Science Foundation.Justworks sponsored this episode of Life of the Law. Our listeners receive a free month when they join. Go to Justworks.com/podcast.© Copyright 2017 Life of the Law. All rights reserved.Photo Credit: amira_a Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

42mins

19 Sep 2017

Rank #16

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132: Death by Police: A Mother's (audio) Diary

Police officers throughout the U.S. shoot and kill unarmed people, in Sacramento, Detroit, New Orleans and in Madison. The Washington Post reports 987 people were shot and killed by police in 2017, sixty-eight of them were unarmed. There are marches and calls for investigations and in the end, justice is elusive. So when Life of the Law producer Zoe Sullivan said the mother of an unarmed bi-racial teenager who had been shot and killed by a police officer in Madison had been keeping an audio diary after her son's death, we listened. We hope you will too.Production Notes:DEATH BY POLICE - A MOTHER'S (AUDIO) DIARY was recorded by Andrea Irwin and produced by Zoe Sullivan. Tony Gannon is our Senior Producer. Nancy Mullane is Executive Producer. Music and production support by Andrea Hendrickson. Rachael Cain is our social-media editor.Life of the Law is a non-profit project of the Tides Center and we’re part of the Panoply Network of Podcasts from Slate. You can also find Life of the Law on PRX, Public Radio Exchange. Visit our website, Life of the Law.org and make a very much appreciated donation to help cover the costs of producing this feature episode. © Copyright 2018 Life of the Law. All rights reserved. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

38mins

2 Apr 2018

Rank #17

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8: Redesigning Justice

Red Hook is an isolated neighborhood of Brooklyn, NY, once known as the “crack capital of America.” In 2000, residents banded together to create a community justice center more responsive to the needs of the neighborhood. Can a more humane courthouse get better results? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

15mins

26 Feb 2013

Rank #18

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66: Who’s the Criminal?

Ever committed a crime? Were you caught? Arrested? Maybe not. Between a quarter and a third of all adults in America were caught and arrested. Now they have a criminal record. What about those who got away?  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

17mins

22 Sep 2015

Rank #19

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67: The Stop

We all know this feeling. You're driving. Maybe you're speeding. Maybe you don't think you're doing anything wrong. All of a sudden blue lights flash in your rear-view mirror. Your stomach drops. You've been stopped.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

19mins

6 Oct 2015

Rank #20