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Education

The Institute of World Politics

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Education
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The Institute of World Politics is a graduate school of national security and international affairs, dedicated to developing leaders with a sound understanding of international realities and the ethical conduct of statecraft, based on knowledge and appreciation of the principles of the American political economy and the Western moral tradition. Please note that the views expressed by our guest lecturers do not necessarily reflect the views of The Institute of World Politics.

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The Institute of World Politics is a graduate school of national security and international affairs, dedicated to developing leaders with a sound understanding of international realities and the ethical conduct of statecraft, based on knowledge and appreciation of the principles of the American political economy and the Western moral tradition. Please note that the views expressed by our guest lecturers do not necessarily reflect the views of The Institute of World Politics.

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Jmr

By jmr20 - May 17 2018
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The sound quality is much improved!

Improved!

By SuzieGonzala - May 17 2018
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Production quality has improved! Now good information AND sound.

iTunes Ratings

26 Ratings
Average Ratings
18
2
1
1
4

Jmr

By jmr20 - May 17 2018
Read more
The sound quality is much improved!

Improved!

By SuzieGonzala - May 17 2018
Read more
Production quality has improved! Now good information AND sound.

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Cover image of The Institute of World Politics

The Institute of World Politics

Updated 3 days ago

Read more

The Institute of World Politics is a graduate school of national security and international affairs, dedicated to developing leaders with a sound understanding of international realities and the ethical conduct of statecraft, based on knowledge and appreciation of the principles of the American political economy and the Western moral tradition. Please note that the views expressed by our guest lecturers do not necessarily reflect the views of The Institute of World Politics.

Assad or We Burn the Country: How One Family’s Lust for Power Destroyed Syria

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About the Book: In spring 2011, Syrian President Bashar al-Assad turned to his friend and army commander, Manaf Tlass, for advice about how to respond to Arab Spring-inspired protests. Tlass pushed for conciliation but Assad decided to crush the uprising — an act which would catapult the country into an eight-year long war, killing almost half a million and fueling terrorism and a global refugee crisis.

Assad or We Burn the Country examines Syria’s tragedy through the generational saga of the Assad and Tlass families, once deeply intertwined and now estranged in Bashar’s bloody quest to preserve his father’s inheritance. By drawing on his own reporting experience in Damascus and exclusive interviews with Tlass, Dagher takes readers within palace walls to reveal the family behind the destruction of a country and the chaos of an entire region.

Dagher shows how one of the world’s most vicious police states came to be and explains how a regional conflict extended globally, engulfing the Middle East and pitting the United States and Russia against one another.

Timely, propulsive, and expertly reported, Assad or We Burn the Country is the definitive account of this global crisis, going far beyond the news story that has dominated headlines for years.

About the Speaker: Sam Dagher is a senior correspondent for The Wall Street Journal focused on Syria, Iraq and Iran. He has worked in the Middle East for more than 12 years. He covered Syria starting in spring 2012. He reported from inside Syria for more than two years and was the only Western correspondent working and living in the Syrian capital Damascus fulltime between June 2013 and August 2014. While in Syria, Dagher reported mainly on the steps taken by the regime of Bashar al-Assad to stay in power and the impact of this on the country and its people. Dagher’s first story from inside Syria in October 2012 was about the counterinsurgency strategy adopted by Assad and his allies Iran and Hezbollah in Damascus which involved demolishing entire neighborhoods sympathetic to rebels and standing up loyalist militias.

Dagher also reported on how the regime fueled sectarianism, mobilized loyalist businessmen to evade international sanctions, rallied minorities to fight on its side, besieged and starved opposition areas and contributed to the rise of Islamic militancy in the country. Dagher reported extensively from the strategic central city of Homs, which was subdued by the regime and its allies only after destroying large parts of it and changing its demographics by driving out most of its Sunni inhabitants. Syria’s Sunni Muslim majority is leading the rebellion against Assad. He also spent time in Syria’s largest city Aleppo, a place partitioned by war.

In August 2014 the regime banned Dagher from entering Syria. In October 2014 he was able to enter the Kurdish-controlled part of the country in the northeast, where he reported on how Kurds were battling Islamic State in order to establish their own self-rule area. He also reported on the battle between Kurds and Islamic State for oil resources and the impact of this on people.

Nov 07 2019

1hr 1min

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Putinomics: Power and Money in Resurgent Russia - Chris Miller

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About the Book: "Putin Watches Russian Economy Collapse along with His Economic Stature,” blared a headline in Time in late 2014. Yet three years have passed since the price of oil crashed in 2014, halving earnings on the product which once funded half of Russia’s government budget. That same year, the West imposed harsh economic sanctions on Russia’s banks, energy firms, and defense sector, cutting off many of Russia’s largest firms from international capital markets and high-tech oil drilling gear. Many analysts—in Russia as well as abroad—thought that economic crisis might threaten Vladimir Putin’s hold on power. It doesn’t look that way now.

Today, Russia’s economy has stabilized, inflation is at historic lows, the budget is nearly balanced, and Putin is coasting toward reelection on March 18, giving him a fourth term as president. Putin has recently overtaken Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev as the longest-serving Russian leader since Stalin. How did he do it? This talk will examine Putin's economic policies and how they have supported his domestic and foreign policies.

About the Author: Chris Miller is Assistant Professor of International History at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. He is also Eurasia Research Director at the Foreign Policy Research Institute. He is the author of Putinomics: Power and Money in Resurgent Russia (2018) and The Struggle to Save the Soviet Economy (2016). He received his PhD from Yale University and his AB from Harvard University.

Mar 16 2018

30mins

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How War With Iran Benefits Russia

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About the Lecture:

The Islamic Republic of Iran wants nuclear weapons to solidify its growing regional hegemony in the Middle East. Such an event will destabilize the already precarious regional order. The Trump Administration is committed to preventing Iran from acquiring nuclear arms at all costs--even potentially risking war with the Islamic Republic. If conflict with Iran were to erupt, Iran's long-time strategic partner, the Russian Federation, would disproportionately benefit.
About the Speaker:

Brandon Weichert is a former Congressional staffer and the founder of The Weichert Report. His book on national security space policy will be released shortly. Brandon holds a B.A. in Political Science from DePaul University and is an Associate Member of New College at Oxford University. Recently, Brandon obtained his M.A. in Statecraft and National Security Affairs with a Specialization in Defense Policy from the Institute of World Politics in Washington, D.C.

On top of being a contributor to the conservative publication, American Greatness, Brandon does speaking engagements, presents papers, and conducts media interviews. He has been featured on BBC World News World Update with Dan Damon, he has been interviewed by The Christian Science Monitor, he has appeared on The Dino Report with Dino Costa, and he has been featured on the Seth & Chris Show offering his expertise as a national security and foreign policy specialist.

Nov 16 2017

1hr 4mins

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Heaven on Earth: The Rise, Fall, and Afterlife of Socialism

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Title: Heaven on Earth: The Rise, Fall, and Afterlife of Socialism

About the Book: Socialism was man's most ambitious attempt to supplant religion with a doctrine claiming to ground itself in “science.” Each failure to create societies of abundance or give birth to “the New Man” inspired more searching for the path to the promised land: revolution, communes, social democracy, communism, fascism, Arab socialism, African socialism. None worked, and some exacted a staggering human toll. Then, after two centuries of wishful thinking and bitter disappointment, socialism imploded in a fin de siècle drama of falling walls and collapsing regimes. It was an astonishing denouement but what followed was no less astonishing. After the hiatus of a couple of decades, new voices were raised, as if innocent of all that had come before, proposing to try it all over again.

About the Author: Dr. Joshua Muravchik is a Distinguished Fellow at the World Affairs Institute. His most recent book is Heaven on Earth: The Rise, Fall, and Afterlife of Socialism (2019). He is the author of ten previous books and more than 400 articles on politics and international affairs, contributing to, among others, the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Wall Street Journal, Foreign Affairs,Foreign Policy, the New York Times Magazine, and Commentary. Muravchik, who received his Ph.D. in International Relations from Georgetown University, is an Adjunct Professor at the Institute for World Politics. He serves on the editorial boards of World Affairs, Journal of Democracy, and the Journal of International Security Affairs. He formerly served as a member of the State Department’s Advisory Committee on Democracy Promotion; the Commission on Broadcasting to the People’s Republic of China; and the Maryland Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights.

Apr 30 2019

1hr 24mins

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Walls or Bridges? A Debate on U.S. Immigration Policy Under Trump

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ABOUT THIS DISCUSSION

With immigration likely to be one of the cornerstone issues of Donald Trump's presidency the debate over immigration, particularly in regards to national security, is far from resolved. At this event Mr. O'Brien and Mr. Nowrasteh will debate the many important issues concerning immigration to the U.S.

ABOUT THE SPEAKERS

Alex Nowrasteh is an immigration policy analyst at the Cato Institute's Center for Global Liberty and Prosperity. His popular publications have appeared in the Wall Street Journal, USA Today, the Washington Post, the Houston Chronicle, the Los Angeles Times, the New York Post, and elsewhere. His academic publications have appeared in the Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, the Fletcher Security Review, and Public Choice. He coauthored, with Mark Krikorian of the Center for Immigration Studies, the booklet Open Immigration: Yea and Nay (Encounter Broadsides, 2014). He is a native of Southern California and received a BA in economics from George Mason University and a Master of Science in economic history from the London School of Economics.

Matthew J. O'Brien joined FAIR in 2016 and is responsible for managing FAIR's research activities. In the past he has held a wide variety of positions focusing on immigration issues, in both the government and private sector. Immediately prior to joining FAIR, Matt served as the Chief of the National Security Division (NSD) within the Fraud Detection and National Security Directorate (FDNS) at U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). There he was responsible for formulating and implementing procedures to protect the legal immigration system from national security threats. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in French from the Johns Hopkins University and a Juris Doctor from the University Of Maine School Of Law. ​

Dr. Paul Coyer is a Research Professor at IWP, a contributor in the area of foreign policy, with a focus on Eurasia, for Forbes, and is a Contributing Editor for Providence: A Journal of Christianity and American Foreign Policy, published by the Institute for Religion and Democracy. He also serves as an Associate Professor at the École Spéciale Militaire de Saint-Cyr, and is a member of the International Institute of Strategic Studies.

Mar 02 2017

1hr 27mins

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Preparing for War: The Emergence of the Modern U.S. Army, 1815–1917

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A former member of the history faculty at West Point, J. P. Clark is an active duty army officer who has served as a strategic advisor to senior civilian and military officials in the Pentagon and British Ministry of Defence.

Jan 23 2017

1hr 18mins

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The Eastern Question, the Crimean War, Lessons for Today

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About the lecture:

The Eastern Question is a subject that involves the the East, the West, Russia, the Balkans, Turkey and the Middle East. It is a story of threat perception, religion and strategic considerations that have their origins going back to the Trojan Wars, carry up through the Crimean War and into the current tensions facing the Region, from Syria to the Ukraine, in the 21st century.

About the speaker:

Dr. Williams is originally from Michigan. He received degrees and diplomas from Culver Military Academy, the University of Virginia, the University of Edinburgh, Scotland, the University of Florence, Italy, and two Masters and a Doctorate in International Law and Diplomacy from the Fletcher School of Law & Diplomacy, a joint Tufts and Harvard Program. He has lived in four foreign countries and has studied and worked professionally in four foreign languages: French, Greek, Italian and Turkish. Formerly a Wall St. and International Investment Banker, he is currently a licensed Realtor, operates a small consulting business, and lectures on a variety of topics, including American History, Turkey and the Middle East. He has been featured on National Public Radio related to several of his interests, has written news Commentary pieces on Turkey and the Middle east, and has published scholarly articles on Ottoman and Turkish Law. He has recently spent two semesters (2016-‘17) in Istanbul teaching a course at Koç University titled, “Turkey and America, East and West – Where the Twain Meet”. Phil is a past National Board member of the English-Speaking Union, a Past Virginia State President of the Sons of the American Revolution, and has served on the board of the American Friends of Turkey for over twenty-three years. Marilyn Williams is his wife and they have two grown children, Margaret (34) and Phillips (32).

Nov 15 2017

1hr 3mins

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Edward Snowden: The Man Who Conned the World

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About the Lecture: Edward Snowden is a polarizing figure in the world today, known by millions and the press as a champion of freedom and a whistle blower exposing extensive activities on the part of the US intelligence community to violate the civil rights of millions of Americans. This one of the many myths that surround this case. In fact, almost all the information in the public domain about Snowden is false. The vast majority of the "Snowden narrative" has been provided by Snowden himself and never verified by the media. Snowden has repeatedly lied about himself, his expertise, the NSA, and his motivations. This discussion exposes truth about the man, his background, and the duplicity of his claims. It is essential for professionals to know the truth to counter the false claims made by Snowden and his supporters and to set the record straight.

About the Speaker: David Major is a retired FBI Supervisory Special Agent and President of the Center of Counterintelligence and Security Studies.

Apr 26 2018

1hr 25mins

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The Hunt for and Identification of CIA Traitor Aldrich Ames

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About the Lecture: In 1985 and 1986, the CIA experienced the unparalleled loss of its stable of Soviet assets, which all but wiped out human source reporting on the Soviet Union. In this lecture, Ms. Grimes will discuss her and her co-spy catcher's personal involvement in the CIA's effort to identify the reason for those losses and to protect future Soviet assets from a similar fate of execution. In 1991, the quest led them to search for a Soviet spy in the CIA. They came to identify that individual as CIA Case Officer, Aldrich Ames, a long-time friend and co-worker. In February of 1994, Ames was arrested by the FBI and sentenced to life in prison.

About the Speaker: Sandy Grimes is a twenty-six year veteran of the CIA's Clandestine Service. She spent most of her career working against the former Soviet Union supporting many of the CIA's most valuable cases, including penetrations of the KGB and GRU. She is co-author of the book "Circle of Treason," which details the search for a Soviet traitor in CIA. It is also the basis for an ABC News mini-series "The Asset", which aired in 2014. The daughter of parents who worked on the Manhattan Project, Sandy spent her formative years in Denver, Colorado, where she substituted a course in Russian for the dreaded junior year of physics that set the direction of her personal and professional life. She holds a BA in Russian from the University of Washington, Seattle. She is a mother of two daughters and grandmother of four. She lives in Great Falls, Virginia with her husband of 49 years.

Nov 19 2018

45mins

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To Lose a Country: France 1940

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Title: To Lose a Country: France 1940

About the Lecture: This lecture is a part of The Loss of Country Panel, which was held at The Institute of World Politics on June 13th.

About the Panelist: Dr. John J. Tierney, Jr. is a Professor Emeritus at The Institute of World Politics and teaches History of American Foreign Policy, History of International Relations, Peace, Strategy and Conflict Resolution, and U.S. Foreign Policy: Current and Future Challenges. He served for many years as the Walter Kohler Professor of International Relations at IWP. Dr. Tierney is a Former Special Assistant and Foreign Affairs Officer for the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency (1981-1993); He formerly participated in various national security negotiations for U.S. Government. He was Executive Director of the Congressional Caucus on National Defense and the National Security Research Group, U.S. House of Representatives. He is former Chairman of the Politics Department at Catholic University and former Professor of International Relations at Univserity of Virginia and The Johns Hopkins University. He is the author of Chasing Ghosts and The Politics of Peace.

Jul 10 2019

55mins

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Understanding the Trump Phenomenon

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Author Michael Walsh discusses the rise of Donald Trump during the 2016 election.

Mar 08 2017

1hr 13mins

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Subordinating Intelligence: The DoD/CIA Post-Cold War Relationship

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About the Book: Since September 11, 2001, the CIA and DoD have operated together in Afghanistan, Iraq, and during counterterrorism operations. Although the global war on terrorism gave the CIA and DoD a common purpose, it was actions taken in the late eighties and early nineties that set the foundation for their current relationship. Driven by the post--Cold War environment and lessons learned during military operations, policy makers made intelligence support to the military the Intelligence Community's top priority. In response to this demand, the CIA/DoD instituted policy and organizational changes that altered the CIA/DoD relationship. While debates over the future of the Intelligence Community were occurring on Capitol Hill, the CIA and DoD were expanding their relationship in peacekeeping and nation-building operations in Somalia and the Balkans. By the late 1990s, some policy makers and national security professionals became concerned that intelligence support to military operations had gone too far, weakening the long-term analysis required for strategy and policy development. In Subordinating Intelligence: The DoD/CIA Post--Cold War Relationship, David P. Oakley reveals that, despite these concerns, no major changes to either national intelligence organization or its priorities were implemented. These concerns were forgotten after 9/11, as the United States fought two wars and policy makers increasingly focused on tactical and operational actions. As policy makers became fixated with terrorism and the United States fought in Iraq and Afghanistan, the CIA directed a significant amount of its resources toward global counterterrorism efforts and in support of military operations.

About the Author: LTC David Oakley is a FA59 (Strategist) with over twenty years as a national security professional within the US Army and the Intelligence Community. He currently serves as an assistant professor at National Defense University’s College of International Security Affairs (CISA) in Washington, D.C. Dave was commissioned a Field Artillery officer in December 1998 through Pittsburg State University’s Reserve Officer Training Corp. After completing the Field Artillery Officer Basic Course, he served in South Korea as a platoon leader with 6-37 Field Artillery, 2nd Infantry Division. Dave was stationed at Fort Sill, Oklahoma from 1999-2005 where he served in the Field Artillery Training Center as a battery executive officer, detachment commander, assistant brigade S-3, battery commander, and company commander. Dave temporarily left active duty for the Army Reserve after completing company command. While off active duty, Dave was selected for the Central Intelligence Agency’s (CIA) Clandestine Service Trainee (CST) Program as a Staff Operations Officer (SOO). After graduating from the CIA’s SOO Certification Course, Dave served within the CIA’s Near East Division. Following his CIA service, Dave served as a contractor with the National Counterterrorism Center’s Directorate of Strategic Operational Planning. Dave returned to active duty as a FA59 in late 2007. Following completion of the Basic Strategic Arts Program (BSAP), he served as a planner with the 1st Infantry Division (1ID) at Fort Riley, Kansas. In 2010, he deployed with 1ID to Iraq where he served as a liaison officer to the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad. In 2011, Dave moved to Fort Leavenworth, Kansas where he attended the Command and General Staff School followed by the School of Advanced Military Studies (SAMS). In 2013, Dave departed Fort Leavenworth for Fort Sam Houston, Texas where he served as a planner with 5th Army/Army North until 2015.

May 31 2019

1hr 3mins

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Russian Policy in its Neighborhood

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About the lecture:

Ambassador Temuri Yakobashvili (former Ambassador of Georgia to the U.S.) will discuss the conditions that led to the conflict between Russia and Georgia. He will outline the steps needed to bring a lasting peace to the region and the role that the United States could play, notably in economic development. He will provide some insight from his experience as Ambassador of Georgia to the United States.

About the speaker:

Ambassador Temuri Yakobashvili is co-Founder and President of the New International Leadership Institute. He is a career diplomat who has held various positions in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Georgia, including that of a Director of the Department for the U.S., Canada, and Latin America. Previously, he was a Deputy Prime Minister and State Minister for Reintegration in the Government of Georgia, and served as an Ambassador of Georgia to the United States. Amb. Yakobashvili is a graduate of Tbilisi State University and has fulfilled training and fellowships at Oxford University’s Center of Political and Diplomatic Studies, Yale University, and Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government.

Nov 01 2017

27mins

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The Weaponization of Social Media

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Title: The Weaponization of Social Media

This lecture is a part of The Institute of World Politics Capitol Hill Speaker Series.

About the Lecture: Ethan Burger will examine the relevance of the Russian concepts ‘Hybrid War’ and ‘Cyberwarfare’ as applied to Russian intervention in the 2016 Brexit Referendum and U.S. Presidential Election. This lecture will focus on the similarity of Russia’s social media campaigns which used false information, fake news, and other content aimed at exploiting the fears and passions of the UK and U.S. electorates. The Kremlin did not rely on the use of social media alone to obtain favorable electoral outcomes. In both cases, Russian ties to supporters of Brexit and the Trump campaign remained largely unnoticed until after voting. Finally, Mr. Burger will explore some steps that might be taken to reduce the vulnerability of countries’ citizens to foreign manipulation.

About the Speaker: Ethan S. Burger, Esq., is a Washington-based international legal consultant and educator, and he is an adjunct professor at the Institute of World Politics. His areas of interest include corporate governance, transnational crime (corruption, cybercrime, and money laundering), and Russian affairs. After working as an attorney on Russian commercial, investment, and risk issues, he segued into academic, research, and advisory roles. Mr. Burger has been a full-time faculty member at American University (School of International Law) and the University of Wollongong (Faculty of Law), and he has also been an adjunct faculty member at Georgetown University Law Center, University of Baltimore, and Washington College of Law. Mr. Burger has lectured in Colombia, India, and Singapore, and he has taught on cyber issues at Vilnius University on a Fulbright Foundation grant. He holds an A.B. from Harvard University and a J.D. from the Georgetown University Law Center.

Apr 12 2019

38mins

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Grand Strategy and American Power in the Asia Pacific Since 1783

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About the Book: Soon after the American Revolution, certain of the founders began to recognize the strategic significance of Asia and the Pacific and the vast material and cultural resources at stake there. Over the coming generations, the United States continued to ask how best to expand trade with the region and whether to partner with China, at the center of the continent, or Japan, looking toward the Pacific. Where should the United States draw its defensive line, and how should it export democratic principles? In a history that spans the eighteenth century to the present, By More Than Providence: Grand Strategy and American Power in the Asia Pacific Since 1783 follows the development of U.S. strategic thinking toward East Asia, identifying recurring themes in American statecraft that reflect the nation's political philosophy and material realities. Drawing on archives, interviews, and his own experience in the Pentagon and White House, Green finds one overarching concern driving U.S. policy toward East Asia: a fear that a rival power might use the Pacific to isolate and threaten the United States and prevent the ocean from becoming a conduit for the westward free flow of trade, values, and forward defense. By More Than Providence works through these problems from the perspective of history's major strategists and statesmen, from Thomas Jefferson to Alfred Thayer Mahan and Henry Kissinger. It records the fate of their ideas as they collided with the realities of the Far East and adds clarity to America's stakes in the region, especially when compared with those of Europe and the Middle East.

About the Author: Michael Jonathan Green is senior vice president for Asia and Japan Chair at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) and director of Asian Studies at the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. He served on the staff of the National Security Council (NSC) from 2001 through 2005, first as director for Asian affairs with responsibility for Japan, Korea, Australia, and New Zealand, and then as special assistant to the president for national security affairs and senior director for Asia, with responsibility for East Asia and South Asia. Before joining the NSC staff, he was a senior fellow for East Asian security at the Council on Foreign Relations, director of the Edwin O. Reischauer Center and the Foreign Policy Institute and assistant professor at the School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) at Johns Hopkins University, research staff member at the Institute for Defense Analyses, and senior adviser on Asia in the Office of the Secretary of Defense. He also worked in Japan on the staff of a member of the National Diet.

Dr. Green is also a nonresident fellow at the Lowy Institute in Sydney, Australia, a distinguished scholar at the Asia Pacific Institute in Tokyo, and professor by special appointment at Sophia University in Tokyo. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, the Aspen Strategy Group, the America Australia Leadership Dialogue, the advisory boards of Radio Free Asia and the Center for a New American Security, and the editorial boards of the Washington Quarterly and the Journal of Unification Studies in Korea. He also serves as a trustee at the Asia Foundation, senior adviser at the Asia Group, and associate of the U.S. Intelligence Community. Dr. Green has authored numerous books and articles on East Asian security, including most recently, By More Than Providence: Grand Strategy and American Power in the Asia Pacific Since 1783 (Columbia University Press, 2017). He received his master’s and doctoral degrees from SAIS and did additional graduate and postgraduate research at Tokyo University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He received his bachelor’s degree in history from Kenyon College with highest honors. He holds a black belt in Iaido (sword) and has won international prizes on the great highland bagpipe.

Jan 29 2019

1hr 9mins

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China's Military and Geopolitical Rise and its Challenge to the US

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About the Lecture: Xi Jinping, China's Communist Party Chairman and President, has ambitious plans to make China a global power. This lecture will discuss the plans to rebuild ancient trading routes with new infrastructure that can become military bases or ports. The lecture also will cover China's plans for a modern, powerful military that can project expeditionary forces to defend China's new, far-flung interests.

About the Speaker: Dr. Larry M. Wortzel served for 32 years in the United States Armed Forces, three years in the Marine Corps followed by 29 years in the Army. A graduate of the U.S. Army War College, Dr. Wortzel earned his Doctor of Philosophy degree from the University of Hawaii-Manoa. Dr. Wortzel’s military experience includes seven years in the infantry as well as assignment in signals intelligence collection, human source intelligence collection, counterintelligence, and as a strategist. He served two tours of duty in Beijing, China, as a military attaché and spent twelve years in the Asia-Pacific Region. Dr. Wortzel is the former Director of the Strategic Studies Institute at the U.S. Army War College. Concurrently he was professor of Asian studies. He retired from the U.S. Army as a colonel at the end of 1999. After his military retirement, he was director of the Asian Studies Center and vice president for foreign policy and defense studies at The Heritage Foundation. Dr. Wortzel has written or edited ten books and numerous scholarly articles on China and East Asia. His books include Class in China: Stratification in a Classless Society; China’s Military Modernization: International Implications; Dictionary of Contemporary Chinese Military History; and The Dragon Extends its Reach: Chinese Military Power Goes Global. Dr. Wortzel was reappointed Commissioner for The U.S.-China Economic and Security Review by House Speaker Paul Ryan for a term expiring on December 31, 2018.

Dec 12 2018

54mins

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10th Annual Kościuszko Chair Conference: Is Russia at War with the U.S.?

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Russia's road to dictatorship and terror under Yeltsin and Putin and how it led to Russia's interference in U.S. internal affairs. The author will also discuss the significance of this interference and how the U.S. should react.

Mr. David Satter is affiliated with the Hudson Institute and the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS). He has written four books about Russia and the Soviet Union, including The Less You Know, the Better You Sleep: Russia's Road to Terror and Dictatorship, which was released in September in paperback.

Nov 16 2017

46mins

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All Measures Short of War: The Contest For the 21st Century and the Future of American Power

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This lecture was presented on July 10, 2017 by Thomas J. Wright at the Institute of World Politics.

About the book: The two decades after the Cold War saw unprecedented cooperation between the major powers as the world converged on a model of liberal international order. Now, great power competition is back and the liberal order is in jeopardy. Russia and China are increasingly revisionist in their regions. The Middle East appears to be unraveling. And many Americans question why the United States ought to lead. What will great power competition look like in the decades ahead? Will the liberal world order survive? What impact will geopolitics have on globalization? And, what strategy should the United States pursue to succeed in an increasingly competitive world? In this book Thomas Wright explains how major powers will compete fiercely even as they try to avoid war with each other. Wright outlines a new American strategy-Responsible Competition-to navigate these challenges and strengthen the liberal order.

About the author: Thomas Wright is the director of the Center on the United States and Europe and a fellow in the Project on International Order and Strategy at the Brookings Institution. He is also a nonresident fellow at the Lowy Institute for International Policy. Previously, he was executive director of studies at the Chicago Council on Global Affairs, a lecturer at the Harris School of Public Policy at the University of Chicago, and senior researcher for the Princeton Project on National Security. Wright has a doctorate from Georgetown University, a Master of Philosophy from Cambridge University, and a bachelor's and master's from University College Dublin. He has also held a pre-doctoral fellowship at Harvard University's Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs and a post-doctoral fellowship at Princeton University.

Jul 14 2017

1hr 11mins

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The Red Sea Region between War and Reconciliation

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About the Book: The Red Sea is one of the world’s most important trade routes, a theater of power struggle among local, regional, and global powers. Military and political developments continue to impact on the geostrategic landscape of the region in the context of its trade thoroughfare for Europe, China, Japan and India; freedom of navigation is a strategic interest for Egypt, and essential for Israel’s economic ties with Asia. Superpower confrontation is inevitable. China, the US, France, Japan and Saudi Arabia have military bases in Djibouti. US strategy seeks to curb Chinese economic influence and Russian political interference in the region through diplomacy and investment. And at the centre of US alliances is the “war on terror” still prevalent in the Middle East and East Africa: Islamic terror groups Al Shabaab in Somalia and Kenya; Al Qaeda of the Arab Peninsula in Yemen; and the Islamic State in Egypt. The civil war in Yemen has become the arena for Iran and Saudi Arabia’s struggle for regional hegemony. Saudi Arabia’s Sunni Arab coalition have been fighting Iranian-backed Shiite Houthi rebels to a stalemate (December 2018). In 2016 Egypt ceded Saudi Arabia the Tiran and Sanafir Islands, the narrow sea passages between the Sinai and Arabian peninsulas, giving control of the entire length of the Red Sea. This, and other perceived positive geostrategic developments, have to be offset by the “nuclearization” of the Red Sea basin (directed in part by Russian foreign policy) and the dangers of multiple country military deployments in the hubs of radical Islam and terrorism potential. A stable future for the region cannot be taken for granted. And as alliances shift and change, so will Israel’s foreign policy and strategic partnerships have to adjust.

About the Speaker: Dr. Col. (Res.) Shaul Shay is a senior research fellow of the International Policy Institute for Counter Terrorism (ICT) and former Director of Research at the Institute for Strategy and Policy (IPS) at the Interdisciplinary Center in Herzliya, Israel.

Nov 06 2019

1hr 7mins

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President Trump and Iran: Cutting Through the Misinformation

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About the Lecture: This lecture will focus on the Trump Administration’s withdrawal from the JCPOA (Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action) and the Administration’s strategy towards Iran. Michael Pregent will discuss the reasons for the Administration’s withdrawal from the JCPOA, the rationale behind the Administration’s “maximum pressure” campaign, the Administration’s naming of the IRGC as a terrorist organization and the impact that action may have on Iran’s ability to exercise influence in Iraq, Syria, and elsewhere. This will be considered in the context of the Trump Administration’s broader plans for the Middle East that seek to simultaneously turn the tables on our enemies there while attempting to cut back on the U.S. military footprint on the ground.

About the Speaker: Michael Pregent is a senior fellow at Hudson Institute. He is a senior Middle East analyst, a former adjunct lecturer for the College of International Security Affairs, and a visiting fellow at the Institute for National Strategic Studies at the National Defense University. Pregent is a former intelligence officer with over 28 years of experience working in security, terrorism, counter-insurgency, and policy issues in the Middle East, North Africa, and Southwest Asia. He is an expert in Middle Eastern and North African political and security issues, counter-terrorism analysis, stakeholder communications, and strategic planning. He spent considerable time working malign Iranian influence in Iraq as an advisor to Iraq’s Security and Intelligence apparatus. Pregent served in Desert Shield and Desert Storm, and he served as a liaison officer in Egypt during the 2000 Intifada, as a counter-insurgency intelligence officer at CENTCOM in 2001, and as a company commander in Afghanistan in 2002. Additionally, Pregent served as an embedded advisor with the Peshmerga in Mosul from 2005-2006. Also, as a civilian SME working for DIA, Pregent served as a political and military advisor to USF-I focusing on reconciliation, the insurgency, and Iranian influence in Iraq from 2007-2011. He was a violent extremism and foreign fighter analyst at CENTCOM from 2011-2013.

Oct 04 2019

1hr 4mins

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What Thucydides can Teach Us About Hong Kong and China: a Critical Response

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About the Lecture: In 2017, Graham Allison, founding dean of the Harvard Kennedy School and former assistant secretary of defense, published “Destined For War: Can America and China Escape Thucydides’s Trap?” Allison’s Thucydides’s Trap rapidly became an influential statement on the challenge that a rising China poses to the international order created and lead by the United States. To help understand the dangers that China’s rapid economic, technological, and military growth poses to both countries, Allison draws on the classic statement on great power war — Thucydides’ History of the Peloponnesian War — to argue that the “structural stress caused when a rising power threatens to upend a ruling one” makes even “ordinary flashpoints” likely to trigger large-scale conflict.” Allison is certainly right about the growth of China. And he is right to look to Thucydides for help. But Allison reduces Thucydides’ magisterial work to an instrument of realpolitik. Using Thucydides’ account of the siege of Plataea as a guide to China’s contemporary treatment of Hong Kong, we can see another, deeper and richer, lesson in Thucydides’ History, one that must not be forgotten by those who wish, in the face of Chinese authoritarianism, to preserve the fragile but precious gift of freedom at the heart of Western civilization.

About the Speaker: Bernard J. Dobski is an Associate Professor of Political Science at Assumption College and is currently a Visiting Scholar for 2019-2020 at the Heritage Foundation. He is the co-editor of two volumes on Shakespeare’s political thought. His articles and essays on the political wisdom of Thucydides, Xenophon, Shakespeare, and Mark Twain appear in the Review of Politics, Interpretation, Society, and Philosophy & Literature. He has also published on foreign policy, military strategy, sovereignty, and nationalism.

Dec 05 2019

1hr 19mins

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The War for Muddy Waters: Pirates, Terrorists, Traffickers, and Maritime Insecurity

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About the Book: Historically, operations and studies regarding maritime security focus on individual threats (e.g., piracy, terrorism, narcotics, etc.) and individual measures to target them (e.g., counter-piracy, counter-terrorism, counter-narcotics). This book explores, for the first time, an overall strategy for maritime security, integrating these issues into a single framework.

Tallis argues that as maritime security threats rise in sophistication, it will be increasingly appealing to apply military resources to counter them. Military tactics, however, may not be the ideal mechanisms for addressing challenges that are often closer to crime than they are to war. Leveraging the sea services’ capabilities, without overly militarizing maritime security, is a complicated problem set that requires a more strategic and partner-oriented approach to the challenge. At stake, in Tallis’ estimation, is the war for tomorrow’s most important communities, their human security, and the muddy waters on which they and the global system rely.

About the Author: Dr. Tallis is a research scientist at the Center for Naval Analyses, a Federally Funded Research and Development Center where he specializes in maritime security, naval strategy, and foreign policy. His project management experience includes directing cross-disciplinary teams building novel research designs to address unstructured strategic and operational questions. He has also conducted independent field research, including embarking USS Harry S. Truman during the U.S. Navy’s first Arctic carrier deployment in nearly 30 years as civilian analyst and adviser to the strike group commander. Tallis holds a Ph.D. in international relations from the University of St Andrews, where he researched theories of littoral security that resulted in the book, The War for Muddy Waters: Pirates, Terrorists, Traffickers, and Maritime Insecurity (Naval Institute Press, 2019).

Dec 04 2019

57mins

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Federal Pianist: The Rueful Tales of the Only One

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About the book: In the halcyon days of the Reagan administration, a young artist was brought in to give the president’s closest friend piano lessons with White House clearance as a political appointee. What the young pianist saw is what few Americans knew. In this true but little known story, John Robilette has changed the names in a novelized account of being the only Reagan appointee that was fired and rehired before creating a public diplomacy program that helped to win the Cold War. And not with the firing of a gun, but with classical music in 63 countries around the world. This sad, comical and explosive story of an innocent in the vortex of power is a must for Americans who are interested in their government, humor, and the arts.

“John Robilette is a brilliant pianist and famous international performer — but, as he shows in this fascinating little book, he was keeping his eyes wide open in that world he so crowned. ‘Federal Pianist,’ based on his own rich experience with the arts in the federal government is alternatively engrossing, sad, and comical. Bravely, he opens a heretofore closed door into the little-known world of arts and foreign policy; you’d be wise to walk right in.”

~Georgie Anne Geyer, Syndicated Columnist, and Foreign Correspondent.

About the author: John Robilette is an international concert pianist who has performed in 26 countries around the world including some of its major classical music venues. He has also recorded commercial CDs’ of solo pieces as well as piano concerti with leading orchestras in Europe. Also now a SAG actor, he has had the lead or supporting roles in nine independent films, many of which were officially selected in film festivals around the United States and in Tokyo, Japan. He further wrote, directed, and produced a 30-minute short comedy film entitled, “My Piano Lesson.” This year he has been named to the 26th Annual SAG awards nominating committee to determine the best male and female actors in drama and comedy for television. He holds a Master of Fine Arts degree from UCLA, a Doctor of Musical Arts from the Catholic University of America with earlier studies at the École Normale de Musique in Paris, France. Dr. Robilette has further served on the piano faculties of two universities and given master classes around the world. As a young man in 1981, he was asked to play a recital at the inauguration of President Ronald Reagan. Subsequently, he was brought into the administration as a political appointee where he created and directed the Artistic Ambassador Program for the United States Information Agency from 1983-1989. This was an intercultural exchange program revolving around classical music which became popular in 63 countries around the world and was honored at the White House.

Dec 03 2019

1hr 33mins

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The Middle Eastern Origin of the Venezuela Crisis

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About the Lecture: The Maduro regime in Venezuela is sustained through a multi-dimensional, multi-faceted, sophisticated matrix of foreign and domestic actors that includes armed groups in Venezuela and transnational criminal and foreign terrorist organizations. While most attention is paid to Cuba, China, and Russia’s role in Venezuela, the regime has increasingly relied on an array of Middle Eastern actors, namely Hezbollah and Iran, to project their revolutionary goals regionwide. Joseph Humire, a former Marine and Iraq war veteran, will present the findings of more than three years of ongoing research that includes many trips to South America to collect firsthand information from those with intimate knowledge of the threat. He has repeatedly briefed these findings on the historic and immigration ties between Venezuela and the Middle East to the Defense Ministries of Brazil, Colombia, as well as various entities within the US Department of Defense, namely Special Operations Command.

About the Speaker: Joseph M. Humire is a global security expert, specializing in trans-regional threats in the Western Hemisphere. Mr. Humire provides regular briefings and lectures on international terrorism, transnational organized crime, Islamism and Iran and Hezbollah’s influence in the Americas to various entities within the U.S. national security community, as well as prominent think tanks and universities worldwide. He has testified numerous times before the U.S. Congress as well as the European and Canadian Parliament. Mr. Humire has also served as an expert witness to several important terrorism trials in South America, including an ongoing trial of an accused Hezbollah operative in Peru.

Mr. Humire is a regular national security commentator for a variety of major English and Spanish language media, including Univision, Telemundo, CNN en Español, and NTN24 regional news network, as well as Fox News and CNN International. He has published in both languages for various newspapers and academic journals across the Americas and released his first book in 2014 titled Iran’s Strategic Penetration of Latin America, published by Lexington Books. More recently, he wrote the foreword for a new book by Dr. Max G. Manwaring, titled Confronting the Evolving Global Security Landscape published by Praeger Security International.

Mr. Humire currently serves as the executive director of the next generation, national security think tank—Center for a Secure Free Society (SFS)—based in Washington D.C. and is a distinguished senior fellow at the Gatestone Institute and the Middle East Forum. Prior to SFS, he served in the U.S. Marine Corps with a combat tour in Iraq and a multinational training exercise UNITAS in Latin America and the Caribbean. After leaving the military, he graduated from George Mason University with a degree in Economics and Global Affairs. Mr. Humire began building SFS’s global network of more than 100 security scholars in almost 30 countries worldwide as the Director of Institute Relations at the Atlas Economic Research Foundation.

Mr. Humire’s unique blend of military experience, economics education, and expertise in asymmetric warfare, offers a new perspective to U.S. foreign policy and national security.

Nov 26 2019

1hr 14mins

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Examining the Construct of Great-Power Competition

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About the Lecture: The Trump Administration’s national defense strategy contains the following judgment: “The central challenge to U.S. prosperity and security is the reemergence of long-term, strategic competition by…revisionist powers.” Why has “great-power competition” become a—if not the—dominant construct guiding the U.S. foreign policy establishment’s understanding of contemporary geopolitics? What are its analytical underpinnings and prescriptive implications?

About the Speaker: Ali Wyne is a Washington, DC-based policy analyst in the RAND Corporation’s Defense and Political Sciences Department. He serves as a nonresident senior fellow with the Atlantic Council’s Scowcroft Center for Strategy and Security and a nonresident fellow with the Modern War Institute. Since January 2015 he has been the rapporteur for a U.S. National Intelligence Council working group that convenes government officials and international relations scholars to analyze trends in the world order.

Ali served as a junior fellow in the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace’s China Program from 2008 to 2009 and as a research assistant to Graham Allison at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs from 2009 to 2012. He has also conducted research for Robert Blackwill, Derek Chollet, Henry Kissinger, Wendy Sherman, and Richard Stengel. From January to July 2013 he worked on a team that prepared Samantha Power for her confirmation hearing to be ambassador to the United Nations. From 2014 to 2015 he was a member of the RAND Corporation’s adjunct staff, working for the late Richard Solomon on its “Strategic Rethink” series.

Ali graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology with dual degrees in Management Science and Political Science (2008) and received his Master in Public Policy from the Harvard Kennedy School (2017), where he was a course assistant to Joseph Nye. While at the Kennedy School, he served on a Hillary for America working group on U.S. policy towards Asia.

Ali is a coauthor of Lee Kuan Yew: The Grand Master’s Insights on China, the United States, and the World (2013) and a contributing author to Our American Story: The Search for a Shared National Narrative (2019), Power Relations in the Twenty-First Century: Mapping a Multipolar World? (2017), and the Routledge Handbook of Public Diplomacy (2008). He has published extensively in outlets including the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Wall Street Journal, the Boston Globe, and the Christian Science Monitor.

Ali delivered the welcome address at the 2011 St. Gallen Symposium, participated in the 2015 Manfred Wörner Seminar, was selected to attend the 2016 Young Strategists Forum and the 2018 Brussels Forum Young Professionals Summit, and participated in the 2018 China-U.S. Young Scholars Dialogue, the 2019 Taiwan-U.S. Policy Program, and the 2019 Atlantik-Brücke Young Leaders Program. In 2012, Young Professionals in Foreign Policy and the Diplomatic Courier selected him as one of the 99 most influential professionals in foreign policy under 33.

Ali is a term member of the Council on Foreign Relations, a David Rockefeller fellow with the Trilateral Commission, and a security fellow with the Truman National Security Project.

Nov 25 2019

1hr 11mins

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Leadership . . . With Chinese Characteristics

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About the Lecture: What sorts of people rise to leadership in the Chinese Communist Party? How do they get to the top? What qualities define them? How should we deal with them? A retired American diplomat speaks from his experience in China.

About the Speaker: William McCahill joined NBR as a Senior Resident Fellow in July 2016. His work focuses on Chinese politics and policy. Before joining NBR, Mr. McCahill had worked in Hong Kong and China as the Senior Advisor for China at Mirabaud & Cie., a Swiss private bank headquartered in Geneva, and earlier in a similar capacity for Religare Capital Markets. He had previously co-founded and managed a China-focused equities and macro research firm, opened the Beijing office of a major American law firm, and operated a business consultancy in China. A 25-year Foreign Service career preceded McCahill’s business activities. He began his diplomatic service in Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Beijing; subsequently held senior posts at US missions in Western Europe, Scandinavia, and Canada; and in 2000 retired from his last posting as Chargé d’affaires at the U.S. Embassy in Beijing. His academic background includes degrees from Boston College and Harvard University in Theology, English, the History of Religion, and Sanskrit & Indian Studies.

Nov 22 2019

1hr 28mins

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Stealth War: How China Took Over While America’s Elite Slept

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About the Book: The media often suggest that Russia poses the greatest threat to America’s national security, but the real danger lies farther east. While those in power have been distracted and disorderly, China has waged a six-front war on America’s economy, military, diplomacy, technology, education, and infrastructure–and they’re winning. It’s almost too late to undo the shocking, though nearly invisible, victories of the Chinese.

In Stealth War, retired Air Force Brigadier General Robert Spalding reveals China’s motives and secret attacks on the West. Chronicling how our leaders have failed to protect us over recent decades, he provides shocking evidence of some of China’s most brilliant ploys, including:

• Placing Confucius Institutes in universities across the United States that serve to monitor and control Chinese students on campus and spread communist narratives to unsuspecting American students.

• Offering enormous sums to American experts who create investment funds that funnel technology to China.

• Signing a thirty-year agreement with the U.S. that allows China to share peaceful nuclear technology, ensuring that they have access to American nuclear know-how.

Spalding’s concern isn’t merely that America could lose its position on the world stage. More urgently, the Chinese Communist Party has a fundamental loathing of the legal protections America grants its people and seeks to create a world without those rights.

Despite all the damage done so far, Spalding shows how it’s still possible for the U.S. and the rest of the free world to combat–and win–China’s stealth war.

About the Author: Robert Spalding retired from the U.S. Air Force as a brigadier general after more than twenty-six years of service. He completed his career as the senior director for strategic planning to the president at the National Security Council, and was the chief architect for the National Security Strategy. He is a former China strategist for the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the Joint Staff at the Pentagon, as well as a senior defense official and defense attaché to China. He earned his doctorate in economics and mathematics from the University of Missouri and is fluent in Mandarin.

Nov 19 2019

59mins

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Measuring Energy Security Risk: Assessing Risk in a Global Energy Market

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About the Lecture: Energy security has been a perennial concern since the early 1970s. But what exactly do we mean by energy security, and how do we know if it’s getting better or worse? This presentation discusses different dimensions of U.S. energy security and how they can be measured in an index. The presentation also will look at how the U.S. performs compared to other large energy-using countries.

About the Speaker: Stephen D. Eule is vice president for climate and technology at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce’s Global Energy Institute. With more than two decades of experience, Eule is a recognized and respected expert on the nexus between energy and climate change. He engages with business groups across the world, is asked frequently to testify before Congress, and is quoted often in major media outlets.

Eule represents the Chamber in the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change and helped found the Major Economies Business Forum on Energy Security and Climate Change, a coalition of more than 20 national cross-sector business organizations from major economies.

Eule also is responsible for GEI’s two authoritative energy security reports—the Index of U.S. Energy Security Risk and the International Index of Energy Security Risk. These risks indices represent the first and most comprehensive efforts to quantify energy security risks over time and across a wide range of measures. They have been cited by the International Energy Agency and are used by universities and think tanks across the world.

Previously, Eule was director of the Office of Climate Change Policy & Technology at the Department of Energy. There he oversaw the development of the U.S. Climate Change Technology Program Strategic Plan in 2006 and ran President Bush’s Climate VISION program. Internationally, Eule represented DOE as part of the U.S. government delegations to the UNFCCC, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the G20, and other multilateral forums. He was lead chapter author on the U.S. Climate Action Report—2006 and contributed to other U.S. government publications.

His prior experience includes a decade working in various public policy positions. He was a subcommittee staff director on the House Science Committee and served as legislative director for Rep. Nick Smith (R-MI). In addition, Eule was an environmental analyst in the Washington, D.C., office of New Jersey Gov. Christine Todd Whitman (R-NJ). Earlier, he worked for eight years as an Orkand Corporation consultant to the Energy Information Administration and worked at the Heritage Foundation.

Eule earned a Master of Arts degree in geography from The George Washington University and a Bachelor of Science degree in biology from Southern Connecticut State College.

Nov 18 2019

1hr 7mins

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Assad or We Burn the Country: How One Family’s Lust for Power Destroyed Syria

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About the Book: In spring 2011, Syrian President Bashar al-Assad turned to his friend and army commander, Manaf Tlass, for advice about how to respond to Arab Spring-inspired protests. Tlass pushed for conciliation but Assad decided to crush the uprising — an act which would catapult the country into an eight-year long war, killing almost half a million and fueling terrorism and a global refugee crisis.

Assad or We Burn the Country examines Syria’s tragedy through the generational saga of the Assad and Tlass families, once deeply intertwined and now estranged in Bashar’s bloody quest to preserve his father’s inheritance. By drawing on his own reporting experience in Damascus and exclusive interviews with Tlass, Dagher takes readers within palace walls to reveal the family behind the destruction of a country and the chaos of an entire region.

Dagher shows how one of the world’s most vicious police states came to be and explains how a regional conflict extended globally, engulfing the Middle East and pitting the United States and Russia against one another.

Timely, propulsive, and expertly reported, Assad or We Burn the Country is the definitive account of this global crisis, going far beyond the news story that has dominated headlines for years.

About the Speaker: Sam Dagher is a senior correspondent for The Wall Street Journal focused on Syria, Iraq and Iran. He has worked in the Middle East for more than 12 years. He covered Syria starting in spring 2012. He reported from inside Syria for more than two years and was the only Western correspondent working and living in the Syrian capital Damascus fulltime between June 2013 and August 2014. While in Syria, Dagher reported mainly on the steps taken by the regime of Bashar al-Assad to stay in power and the impact of this on the country and its people. Dagher’s first story from inside Syria in October 2012 was about the counterinsurgency strategy adopted by Assad and his allies Iran and Hezbollah in Damascus which involved demolishing entire neighborhoods sympathetic to rebels and standing up loyalist militias.

Dagher also reported on how the regime fueled sectarianism, mobilized loyalist businessmen to evade international sanctions, rallied minorities to fight on its side, besieged and starved opposition areas and contributed to the rise of Islamic militancy in the country. Dagher reported extensively from the strategic central city of Homs, which was subdued by the regime and its allies only after destroying large parts of it and changing its demographics by driving out most of its Sunni inhabitants. Syria’s Sunni Muslim majority is leading the rebellion against Assad. He also spent time in Syria’s largest city Aleppo, a place partitioned by war.

In August 2014 the regime banned Dagher from entering Syria. In October 2014 he was able to enter the Kurdish-controlled part of the country in the northeast, where he reported on how Kurds were battling Islamic State in order to establish their own self-rule area. He also reported on the battle between Kurds and Islamic State for oil resources and the impact of this on people.

Nov 07 2019

1hr 1min

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The Red Sea Region between War and Reconciliation

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About the Book: The Red Sea is one of the world’s most important trade routes, a theater of power struggle among local, regional, and global powers. Military and political developments continue to impact on the geostrategic landscape of the region in the context of its trade thoroughfare for Europe, China, Japan and India; freedom of navigation is a strategic interest for Egypt, and essential for Israel’s economic ties with Asia. Superpower confrontation is inevitable. China, the US, France, Japan and Saudi Arabia have military bases in Djibouti. US strategy seeks to curb Chinese economic influence and Russian political interference in the region through diplomacy and investment. And at the centre of US alliances is the “war on terror” still prevalent in the Middle East and East Africa: Islamic terror groups Al Shabaab in Somalia and Kenya; Al Qaeda of the Arab Peninsula in Yemen; and the Islamic State in Egypt. The civil war in Yemen has become the arena for Iran and Saudi Arabia’s struggle for regional hegemony. Saudi Arabia’s Sunni Arab coalition have been fighting Iranian-backed Shiite Houthi rebels to a stalemate (December 2018). In 2016 Egypt ceded Saudi Arabia the Tiran and Sanafir Islands, the narrow sea passages between the Sinai and Arabian peninsulas, giving control of the entire length of the Red Sea. This, and other perceived positive geostrategic developments, have to be offset by the “nuclearization” of the Red Sea basin (directed in part by Russian foreign policy) and the dangers of multiple country military deployments in the hubs of radical Islam and terrorism potential. A stable future for the region cannot be taken for granted. And as alliances shift and change, so will Israel’s foreign policy and strategic partnerships have to adjust.

About the Speaker: Dr. Col. (Res.) Shaul Shay is a senior research fellow of the International Policy Institute for Counter Terrorism (ICT) and former Director of Research at the Institute for Strategy and Policy (IPS) at the Interdisciplinary Center in Herzliya, Israel.

Nov 06 2019

1hr 7mins

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Continuous Cyber Security Management: An industry standards based approach

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About the Lecture: This lecture will discuss an industry standards based approach to manage cyber security threats. The focus will be to understand holistically where weaknesses exist and the overall cyber security posture. Also discussed will be a prioritized approach for mitigating the most serious threats and associated remediation. This will focus on complete end to end cyber security management, starting from all end points to all network connected devices as well as the cloud infrastructure. Additionally, all operating systems and application vulnerabilities and ports associated with these devices will be reviewed and a holistic approach for continuous cyber security management.

About the Speaker: Ari Bose is the CEO & President at Torii Technologies where he provides the leadership that is driving innovation and growth for Torii Technologies, which is a cyber security and compliance company. Prior to Torii, Ari was the Chief Information Officer for major, global companies such as Brocade, Polycom, UTStarcom and 3COM.

Ari is a Global Information Technology, Operations, and Business Transformation executive with demonstrated success in leading teams and line management to design, implement, and communicate transformational changes that improve business performance and drive profitability. His track record is one of successfully leading critical corporate initiatives in rapidly changing, diverse global environments. Ari is a strategic leader and advisor, able to mentor and motivate business and technical teams across a variety of verticals to achieve superior results.

Oct 23 2019

43mins

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President Trump and Iran: Cutting Through the Misinformation

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About the Lecture: This lecture will focus on the Trump Administration’s withdrawal from the JCPOA (Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action) and the Administration’s strategy towards Iran. Michael Pregent will discuss the reasons for the Administration’s withdrawal from the JCPOA, the rationale behind the Administration’s “maximum pressure” campaign, the Administration’s naming of the IRGC as a terrorist organization and the impact that action may have on Iran’s ability to exercise influence in Iraq, Syria, and elsewhere. This will be considered in the context of the Trump Administration’s broader plans for the Middle East that seek to simultaneously turn the tables on our enemies there while attempting to cut back on the U.S. military footprint on the ground.

About the Speaker: Michael Pregent is a senior fellow at Hudson Institute. He is a senior Middle East analyst, a former adjunct lecturer for the College of International Security Affairs, and a visiting fellow at the Institute for National Strategic Studies at the National Defense University. Pregent is a former intelligence officer with over 28 years of experience working in security, terrorism, counter-insurgency, and policy issues in the Middle East, North Africa, and Southwest Asia. He is an expert in Middle Eastern and North African political and security issues, counter-terrorism analysis, stakeholder communications, and strategic planning. He spent considerable time working malign Iranian influence in Iraq as an advisor to Iraq’s Security and Intelligence apparatus. Pregent served in Desert Shield and Desert Storm, and he served as a liaison officer in Egypt during the 2000 Intifada, as a counter-insurgency intelligence officer at CENTCOM in 2001, and as a company commander in Afghanistan in 2002. Additionally, Pregent served as an embedded advisor with the Peshmerga in Mosul from 2005-2006. Also, as a civilian SME working for DIA, Pregent served as a political and military advisor to USF-I focusing on reconciliation, the insurgency, and Iranian influence in Iraq from 2007-2011. He was a violent extremism and foreign fighter analyst at CENTCOM from 2011-2013.

Oct 04 2019

1hr 4mins

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War and Humanitarianism: The Case of Maurice Pate (1894-1965)

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This lecture is our ninth annual Kosciuszko Chair Military Lecture held in honor of Gen. Walter Jajko. It is sponsored by the Center for Intermarium Studies and the Kosciuszko Chair of Polish Studies at The Institute of World Politics.

About the Lecture: About the Lecture: Maurice Pate (1894-1965) was an American gentleman of the old WASP school who already early in his youth felt an urge to help civilian victims, children in particular, of war, revolution, and other calamities. He will serve as a paradigm for our inquiry about humanitarian aspects of conflict. The focus will be on the American Relief Administration whose charity work saved millions of Europeans from death and disease. Specifically, this lecture will refer to Pate’s role in ARA’s stupendous effort in Poland between 1919 and 1921, while also covering briefly his career afterwards, which culminated in the assumption of the post of the executive director of UNICEF. The lecture will be based on the research conducted for the Intermarium/Pinsk project at the Seely G. Mudd Manuscript Library, Princeton University, and Hoover Institution, Stanford, California, among other places.

About the Speaker: About the speaker: Dr. Marek Jan Chodakiewicz holds The Kosciuszko Chair in Polish Studies at The Institute of World Politics, where he also serves as a Professor of History and teaches courses on Geography and Strategy, Contemporary Politics and Diplomacy, Russian Politics and Foreign Policy, and Mass Murder Prevention in Failed and Failing States. He is the author of Intermarium: The Land Between the Black and Baltic Seas and numerous other books and articles. Professor Chodakiewicz is the head of the Center for Intermarium Studies at The Institute of World Politics. He holds a Ph.D. from Columbia University and has previously taught at the University of Virginia and Loyola Marymount University

Oct 01 2019

54mins

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Russification vs Westernization: battle for hearts and minds of Belarusians

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About the Lecture: Belarus can’t find a way out of geopolitical turbulence. In contrast to neighboring Ukraine, Russian meddling here is mostly done through soft power. But the Belarusian society is growing more resilient in the face of the Kremlin’s narratives. Confronting Russian revanchism, Belarusians embrace their pre-soviet history, like a heritage of Grand Duchy of Lithuania and Rzeczpospolita. Before Presidential elections next year, and Population census this fall, a discussion about identity and national ideology is intensifying. What can the West do about it?

About the Speaker: Franak Viačorka is the Vice President of the Digital Communication Network. He concurrently works as the consultant for U.S. Agency for Global Media, and he is the Creative Director of RFE/RL Belarus Service. Mr. Viačorka is a frequent speaker and advocate for democracy and personal freedom in post-Soviet countries. An expert in Russian disinformation, he recently published research on the Kremlin-backed media, Russian Orthodox church, and think-tanks as the Kremlin’s “soft-power."

Mr. Viačorka has earned degrees from American University in Washington D.C. and Warsaw University in Poland, and he has also studied at Georgetown University and European Humanities University.

Sep 26 2019

1hr 8mins

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Israel’s Energy Security and Strategy: Changing Dynamics in the Age of Gas

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About the Lecture: Until about two decades ago, Israel imported 98 percent of its energy requirements from far off places on the globe. Although located in a region rich in oil and gas, relation of political enmity with the producers effectively rendered the Jewish state an energy island, isolated from intra-regional energy trade and electricity grids. Securing energy supply from abroad has always been a major concern of Israeli policymakers. However, with the discovery of natural gas in its Mediterranean waters, Israel’s energy-dependent status is changing rapidly. Today, close to 70 percent of Israel’s electricity is generated from natural gas; the rest comes from imported coal. Israel’s transportation still relies exclusively on imported oil, a small amount of which is also used in industrial, residential and commercial sectors. To meet its growing energy requirement and vulnerability vis-à-vis the imports of fossil fuels, Israel – similar to other large energy consumers, such as, India, China and Turkey – has evolved a multi-faceted energy security strategy, which has six essential components. These include, broadening of import; pursuit of proximate supply sources; constant search for indigenous energy; development of renewables and alternatives; ensuring physical security of energy installations; and promotion of energy efficiency. This lecture will talk about each of these components and assess the on-going transformation of Israel’s energy status from import-dependency to energy self-sufficiency that is underpinned by the gas discoveries.

About the Speaker: Dr. Sujata Ashwarya is Associate Professor in the Centre for West Asian Studies [Middle Eastern], Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi, India. She received her MPhil and PhD degrees in West Asian Studies from Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi. She was awarded research fellowships at the Rothberg International School, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel; Maison des Sciences de l’Homme (MSH) and Centre d’Etudes et des Recherches Internationales (CERI), Paris; and the Schusterman Centre for Israel Studies, Brandeis University, USA. She was also affiliated as a researcher at the Faculty of World Studies, University of Tehran, Iran. Her research interests cover a wide range of areas related to politics, economics and international relations of West Asia. Of primary focus are the domestic development, foreign policy and strategic-security issues (especially those related to Iran, Iraq and Israel), politics of energy, conflict and peace-making, and themes related to civil society and democratization in the region. She also has a strong interest in exploring India’s West Asia policy. A frequent traveler, Dr Ashwarya has presented more than 50 research papers in national and international conferences and seminars. She has more than 30 published research articles and has written, edited and co-edited 5 books. Her books include, Israel’s Mediterranean Gas: Domestic Governance, Economic Impact, and Strategic Implications (Routledge, 2019), Contemporary West Asia: Perspectives on Change and Continuity (co-edited; Routledge, 2019); India-Iran Relations: Progress, Problems and Prospects (Routledge, 2017); Essays on Iran and Israel: An Indian Perspective(Knowledge World, 2014); and Civil Society, Democracy and State in West Asia (edited; New Century, 2010).

Sep 24 2019

1hr 22mins

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The war begins: Poland, September 1939

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About the lecture: Dr. Chodakiewicz will discuss the details of the Nazi and the Soviet attack on Poland in 1939. He will explain pre-war diplomatic arrangements and the impossible predicament of Poland stuck between Germany and the Soviet Union.

About the Speaker: Dr. Marek Jan Chodakiewicz holds The Kosciuszko Chair in Polish Studies at The Institute of World Politics, where he also serves as a Professor of History and teaches courses on Geography and Strategy, Contemporary Politics and Diplomacy, Russian Politics and Foreign Policy, and Mass Murder Prevention in Failed and Failing States. He is the author of Intermarium: The Land Between the Black and Baltic Seas and numerous other books and articles. Professor Chodakiewicz is the head of the Center for Intermarium Studies at The Institute of World Politics. He holds a Ph.D. from Columbia University and has previously taught at the University of Virginia and Loyola Marymount University.

Sep 19 2019

1hr

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The Fight So Far

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Title: The Fight So Far

About the Lecture: Lieutenant General Michael Nagata, USA, Ret. will discuss a strategic review of the US Government’s efforts against terrorism, both past and present.

About the Speaker: Michael K. Nagata retired from the US Army in 2019 after 38 years of Active Duty, 34 of which were spent in US Special Operations. His final position was Director of Strategy for the National Counterterrorism Center from 2016 to 2019.

As an Officer, he initially served as a Platoon Leader in the 2nd Infantry Division before volunteering for Army Special Forces in 1984. In Special Forces, he served in various positions including Detachment Commander, Company Executive Officer, Battalion Operations Officer and Executive Officer, and Group Operations Officer.

He then served within the US Intelligence Community in Washington D.C. as a Military Deputy for Counterterrorism until 2009. Afterward, he deployed again until late 2011 to Pakistan as the Deputy Chief, Office of the Defense Representative at the US Embassy there. Upon returning to the US, he served on the Joint Staff as the Deputy Director for Special Operations and Counterterrorism until 2013.

LTG (R) Nagata assumed command of Special Operations Command-Central, and was responsible for Special Operations across the Central Command region from 2013 to 2015, and was heavily involved in the first two years of combat operations against the Islamic State in Iraq, Syria, and elsewhere.

Sep 16 2019

1hr 8mins

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How NGOs are Using Digital Media to Advance Human Rights

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The Mission of the Republic of Senegal to the UN hosted a United Nations roundtable for 14+ member nations on July 30, 2019. Dr. Matthew Daniels of IWP, Stephen Enada of the Int Committee on Nigeria, and Katy Money of Ushahidi led the discussion on how NGOs are using digital media.

Aug 08 2019

1hr

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Losing One’s Country Twice, Finding it Once

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Title: Losing One’s Country Twice, Finding it Once

About the Lecture: This lecture is a part of The Loss of Country Panel, which was held at The Institute of World Politics on June 13th.

About the Panelist: Dr. Marek Jan Chodakiewicz holds The Kosciuszko Chair in Polish Studies at The Institute of World Politics, where he also serves as a Professor of History and teaches courses on Geography and Strategy, Contemporary Politics and Diplomacy, Russian Politics and Foreign Policy, and Mass Murder Prevention in Failed and Failing States. He is the author of Intermarium: The Land Between the Black and Baltic Seas and numerous other books and articles. He holds a Ph.D. from Columbia University and has previously taught at the University of Virginia and Loyola Marymount University.

Jul 11 2019

1hr 22mins

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To Lose a Country: France 1940

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Title: To Lose a Country: France 1940

About the Lecture: This lecture is a part of The Loss of Country Panel, which was held at The Institute of World Politics on June 13th.

About the Panelist: Dr. John J. Tierney, Jr. is a Professor Emeritus at The Institute of World Politics and teaches History of American Foreign Policy, History of International Relations, Peace, Strategy and Conflict Resolution, and U.S. Foreign Policy: Current and Future Challenges. He served for many years as the Walter Kohler Professor of International Relations at IWP. Dr. Tierney is a Former Special Assistant and Foreign Affairs Officer for the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency (1981-1993); He formerly participated in various national security negotiations for U.S. Government. He was Executive Director of the Congressional Caucus on National Defense and the National Security Research Group, U.S. House of Representatives. He is former Chairman of the Politics Department at Catholic University and former Professor of International Relations at Univserity of Virginia and The Johns Hopkins University. He is the author of Chasing Ghosts and The Politics of Peace.

Jul 10 2019

55mins

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