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Rank #114 in Government category

Government

Policing Matters

Updated 9 days ago

Rank #114 in Government category

Government
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Talking the beat with leaders and experts.PoliceOne is the world’s most comprehensive and trusted online destination for law enforcement professionals, department decision-makers and industry experts.Founded in 1999, with more than 515,000 registered members representing more than 16,000 departments, PoliceOne effectively provides the law enforcement community with the information they need to protect their communities and come home safe after every shift.

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Talking the beat with leaders and experts.PoliceOne is the world’s most comprehensive and trusted online destination for law enforcement professionals, department decision-makers and industry experts.Founded in 1999, with more than 515,000 registered members representing more than 16,000 departments, PoliceOne effectively provides the law enforcement community with the information they need to protect their communities and come home safe after every shift.

iTunes Ratings

78 Ratings
Average Ratings
51
12
5
4
6

Great info

By J.A.E - Jan 20 2018
Read more
This podcast encompasses many relevant topics that a rookie to admin can relate too.

Officer

By Milhail1989 - Apr 22 2016
Read more
Police Officer here, great material for young and salty officers alike. Keep up the good work!

iTunes Ratings

78 Ratings
Average Ratings
51
12
5
4
6

Great info

By J.A.E - Jan 20 2018
Read more
This podcast encompasses many relevant topics that a rookie to admin can relate too.

Officer

By Milhail1989 - Apr 22 2016
Read more
Police Officer here, great material for young and salty officers alike. Keep up the good work!
Cover image of Policing Matters

Policing Matters

Latest release on May 14, 2020

Read more

Talking the beat with leaders and experts.PoliceOne is the world’s most comprehensive and trusted online destination for law enforcement professionals, department decision-makers and industry experts.Founded in 1999, with more than 515,000 registered members representing more than 16,000 departments, PoliceOne effectively provides the law enforcement community with the information they need to protect their communities and come home safe after every shift.

Rank #1: How the FTO's teaching role differs from academy instruction

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During the annual conference of the International Law Enforcement Educators and Trainers Association (ILEETA) in St. Louis, Policing Matters podcast co-host Doug Wyllie roamed the hallways and ran into countless law enforcement trainers and experts, some of whom were willing to sit down and talk about what they're teaching and what they're learning. In this podcast segment, Doug sits down with Dan Green to discuss the importance of the Field Training Officer and how the FTO's teaching role differs from academy instruction.

May 23 2019

12mins

Play

Rank #2: Baltimore: A microcosm of de-policing in America

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In Baltimore, it has been reported that from 2014 to 2017, dispatch records show the number of suspected narcotics offenses police reported themselves dropped 30 percent. The number of people they reported seeing with outstanding warrants dropped by half. The number of field interviews dropped 70 percent. This type of de-policing has emboldened criminals and crime now is on the rise. In September 2018, 37 people were killed in the city, making that the deadliest month in more than a year. Baltimore has had five police commissioners in four years. In this podcast segment, Jim and Doug discuss how things went from bad to worse in Charm City following the death of Freddie Gray and the subsequent anti-police protests.

Mar 15 2019

11mins

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Rank #3: Words of wisdom: Applying famous quotes to policing

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Henry Ford once said, “When everything seems to be going against you, remember that the airplane takes off against the wind, not with it.” This famous quote can easily be applied to law enforcement in 2019, with so many factors seemingly going against the profession. Winston Churchill once said, “Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak. Courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen.” Police officers at every level have countless opportunities to listen to citizens and collect information and intelligence about what's happening in the community. There are myriad famous quotes that can be applied to law enforcement. In this podcast segment, Jim and Doug share some of their favorites.

Feb 08 2019

14mins

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Rank #4: Parkland school shooting: What leadership failures mean for LE nationwide

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Florida Governor Ron DeSantis fired Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel—who served as the 16th sheriff of that county—on January 11, 2019. Many would argue that his firing was long overdue. His agency was derided for failing to take control over a shooting at the Fort Lauderdale airport in 2017. Then, in 2018, deputies with the agency failed miserably in their response to the mass murder taking place at the Stoneman Douglas High School. In April 2018, the Broward Sheriff's Office Deputies Association opened a no-confidence vote—it tallied 534–94 against Israel. In this podcast segment, Jim and Doug discuss Israel's dismissal, and what it means for law enforcement leaders nationwide.

Feb 15 2019

12mins

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Rank #5: Officer wellness and safety in 21st century policing

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In December 2014, President Barack Obama signed an executive order establishing the Task Force on 21st Century Policing. The president charged the task force with identifying best practices and offering recommendations on how policing practices can promote effective crime reduction while building public trust. The task force released its final report in May of 2015. In it was what the task force called the “Six Pillars of 21st Century Policing.” In this week’s podcast, Jim and Doug discuss the sixth and final pillar — Officer Wellness and Safety.

Feb 16 2017

14mins

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Rank #6: 4 troubling trends that affected law enforcement in 2016

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As we wind down 2016, we reflect on all of the events and trends which made headlines and shaped the national conversation about law enforcement. In this special end-of-year Policing Matters podcast, Jim and Doug discuss four things they identify as the biggest trends of the year: the increase in the number of opioid deaths (which now exceeds the number of homicide deaths), the number of peaceful protests which turned into violent riots this year, the trend of increased crime in cities where cops are pulling back from proactive policing, and the spike in ambush attacks on LE in 2016. As always, if you have topic suggestions for the podcast, email us at policingmatters@policeone.com.

Dec 23 2016

45mins

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Rank #7: California's AB 392 and police use-of-force policies

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Recently, Governor Gavin Newsom signed AB 392. Media reaction would indicate that the bill would drastically reduce police use of force, but the reality is that the new language does little to restrict officers from using force when they reasonably believe that there exists an imminent threat of death or serious bodily injury to the officer or to another person, or to apprehend a fleeing person for any felony that threatened or resulted in death or serious bodily injury. Still, the law does contain some language that might cause officers to hesitate to use force, potentially putting them in danger. Some opponents to the law are calling it a watershed event that could negatively affect policing in the United States. In this podcast segment, Jim and Doug discuss the law and its potential result on police use of force.

Sep 12 2019

12mins

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Rank #8: In what direction does the First Step Act lead us?

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Proponents of the First Step Act — a bipartisan law aimed at reforming the criminal justice system — say it would significantly improve the prison system. Opponents say there are loopholes that would allow dangerous criminals with a high probability to reoffend to be released from prison. The text of the law says that the BOP would adopt a risk assessment tool, assess all federal prisoners for their risk of recidivism, and categorize them as minimum, low, medium, or high risk. In this podcast segment, Jim and Doug discuss the First Step Act.

Jan 11 2019

12mins

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Rank #9: One officer's story of the day he put a gun to his head

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During the annual conference of the International Law Enforcement Educators and Trainers Association (ILEETA) in St. Louis, Policing Matters podcast co-host Doug Wyllie roamed the hallways and ran into countless law enforcement trainers and experts, some of whom were willing to sit down and talk about what they're teaching and what they're learning. In this podcast segment, Doug sits down with PoliceOne columnist Duane Wolfe, who in 2012 wrote an article entitled "The day I put a gun to my head." Duane and Doug discuss the genesis of that article as well as the impact it has had on officers contemplating suicide.

Apr 26 2019

11mins

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Rank #10: Why agencies should keep mounted, bike and foot patrols

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Walking the beat is a fundamental element to community policing. Other forms of patrol aimed principally at community engagement have officers mounted atop equine partners, and rolling around town on tricked-out mountain bikes. In all these cases, officers on foot create opportunities for the public to connect with their police (and vice versa). Conversely, when officers are wrapped in two tons of metal and plastic, that opportunity for real connection is essentially lost. In this podcast segment, Jim and Doug discuss the need for agencies to keep these types of patrol efforts well-staffed and supported.

Jan 18 2019

12mins

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Rank #11: Financial planning tips for police officers

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All too often police officers put themselves in unnecessary financial strain, causing them to have to work a ton of overtime or even get a side job. In this podcast segment, Policing Matters podcast co-host Doug Wyllie sits down with Jason Hoschouer, a motor officer and a financial coach who specializes in helping public safety professionals better manage their money.

Jun 14 2019

12mins

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Rank #12: Police responsibility to regularly maintain equipment and gear

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In New York, some 20,000 DUI arrests are in jeopardy because of false verifications due to aging and inaccurate equipment. Agencies are required to conduct regular maintenance of a variety of types of equipment, and yet it would appear that in some cases, that regular maintenance is not being conducted, putting not only convictions at risk, but possibly even lives. In this podcast segment, Jim and Doug discuss the responsibility for agencies to check to be sure their gear is in good working order.

Dec 21 2018

11mins

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Rank #13: What the surge in swatting calls means for police

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In mid-February someone called 911 in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina claiming to be Robert McCord, a reserve officer with the department. The caller told dispatchers he’d just shot his wife and was going to kill the rest of the people in the house. Police responded as one might imagine they would respond to such a call—they sent in SWAT to ensure the safety of innocents. McCord exited his home with hands held high above his head, walking slowly toward responders. The incident ended with nobody injured, but so-called "swatting" calls have been fatal on all too many occasions. In this podcast segment, Jim and Doug discuss what can be done to prevent swatting as well as how police investigate and charge people for making swatting calls.

Mar 08 2019

12mins

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Rank #14: How Terry v. Ohio became Stop and Frisk

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The 1968 Supreme Court Decision in Terry v. Ohio held that a person’s Fourth Amendment rights are not violated when a police officer stops a subject and frisks him as long as the officer has a reasonable suspicion that the person has committed, is committing, or is about to commit a crime and has a reasonable belief that the person may be armed. However, some civil rights organizations contend that a number of agencies took advantage of this ruling to inappropriately stop and frisk people without being able to articulate that reasonable suspicion. In this podcast segment, Jim and Doug discuss the fact that officers must be able to report in detail (in a narrative form, not just check boxes) what led them to stop and frisk an individual.

Jun 08 2017

13mins

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Rank #15: How instructors can help students get more out of police firearms training

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During the annual conference of the International Law Enforcement Educators and Trainers Association (ILEETA) in St. Louis, Policing Matters podcast co-host Doug Wyllie roamed the hallways and ran into countless law enforcement trainers and experts, some of whom were willing to sit down and talk about what they're teaching and what they're learning. In this podcast segment, Doug sits down with PoliceOne Contributors Todd and Chrystal Fletcher—co-owners of Combative Firearms Training, LLC—about the way in which their unique pairing provides opportunities for students to get more out of training.

May 17 2019

11mins

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Rank #16: Putting police in the political cross hairs

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Former presidential candidate Beto O'Rourke famously said during a recent debate that he'd gladly enforce a mandatory gun buy-back program that would target legally purchased "assault rifles" such as AR-15s and AK-47s. Disregarding the discussion about the Constitutionality of such a proposal, his suggestion highlights how politicians have a tendency to put police in the middle of political issues without knowing all the details of an issue. In this podcast segment, Jim and Doug discuss how O'Rourke's suggestion would put police officers in danger, how it doesn't really address the matter of gun violence in America, and how it shines a light on how police are too often put in the middle of a political debate.

Nov 08 2019

11mins

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Rank #17: Technology and social media in 21st century policing

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In December 2014, President Barack Obama signed an executive order establishing the Task Force on 21st Century Policing. The president charged the task force with identifying best practices and offering recommendations on how policing practices can promote effective crime reduction while building public trust. The task force released its final report in May of 2015. In it was what the task force called the “Six Pillars of 21st Century Policing.” In this week’s podcast, Jim and Doug discuss the third pillar — Technology and Social Media — and in coming weeks will tackle each subsequent pillar in turn.

Jan 27 2017

13mins

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Rank #18: Keys to successful multi-jurisdictional, multi-disciplinary response to large-scale events

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During the annual conference of the International Law Enforcement Educators and Trainers Association (ILEETA) in St. Louis, Policing Matters podcast co-host Doug Wyllie roamed the hallways and ran into countless law enforcement trainers and experts, some of whom were willing to sit down and talk about what they're teaching and what they're learning. In this podcast segment, Doug sits down with Chief Bill Harvey to discuss some of the keys to multi-jurisdictional, multi-disciplinary response to large-scale events — both planned and unplanned — to ensure citizen and first responder safety.

Apr 19 2019

11mins

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Rank #19: Government responsibility and obligation in 21st century policing

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In December 2014, President Barack Obama signed an executive order establishing the Task Force on 21st Century Policing. The president charged the task force with identifying best practices and offering recommendations on how policing practices can promote effective crime reduction while building public trust. The task force released its final report in May of 2015. In it was what the task force called the “Six Pillars of 21st Century Policing.” Over the course of the last six weeks, Jim and Doug have discussed each of the six pillars. In this week’s podcast, Jim and Doug each offer thoughts on what they would add as the seventh pillar.

Feb 24 2017

10mins

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Rank #20: Policing on Halloween: Replica weapons, crowd control, and child safety

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Policing on Halloween is different from any other day of the year. Children who are ordinarily on their living room couch after supper are out on the streets. Adults consuming large quantities of alcohol wander from one bar to another carrying costume "props" resembling edged weapons and firearms. Teenagers get into all manner of mayhem. In this podcast segment, Jim and Doug discuss the various challenges facing police officers on the final night of October.

Oct 25 2019

11mins

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Why kids are the key to good police-community relationships

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Police officers have myriad unique opportunities to positively influence America's children—from infancy to young adulthood and beyond. In this podcast segment, Jim and Doug discuss how informal, day-to-day interactions between officers and young people can help begin to change the anti-police sentiment that has taken root among some members of society, as well as how formally funded agency programs like Police Athletic Leagues, Shop with a Cop, National Night Out, and Explorer programs can help improve police-community relations.

May 14 2020

11mins

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Cops' unique brand of humor

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With the advent of social media sites like Facebook, Instragram, and Twitter—and the rapid rise in law enforcement agencies and officers posting humorous items to those services—the American public is getting a significantly better glimpse into the fact that police officers have a unique brand of humor. In this podcast segment, Jim and Doug discuss how police use humor to alleviate stress from the job.

May 08 2020

9mins

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Solving cold cases

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An estimated 40% of the homicides that occurred in the U.S. from 1980 to 2016—approximately 242,000—remain unsolved. Countless other violent crimes—from assault to rape to robbery—also remain open with investigators trying to piece together the evidence in pursuit of justice on behalf of the individual victims as well as society at large. In this podcast segment, Jim and Doug discuss how new technology and an increase in information sharing across agencies nationwide can help police close more cold cases.

Apr 30 2020

11mins

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Redefining 'juvenile' crime

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Some jurisdictions are reconsidering the definition of "juvenile" as it relates to the prosecution of criminal acts. For example, California lawmakers are considering raising the age limit of individuals who would be tried and sentenced as juveniles from 17- to 19-years-old. The author of the bill, Democratic State Senator Nancy Skinner, says that "under the bill, 18- and 19-year-olds would be treated as juveniles in criminal proceedings." She added in a statement on her website, "When teenagers make serious mistakes and commit crimes, state prison is not the answer. Processing teenagers through the juvenile justice system will help ensure they receive the appropriate education, counseling, treatment, and rehabilitation services necessary to achieve real public safety outcomes." In this podcast segment, Jim and Doug Discuss this proposal as well as others like it, and what the ramifications would be on the criminal justice system as well as public safety in general.

Apr 24 2020

12mins

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The impact of COVID-19 on reported crime

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In this installment of Policing Matters, Jim Dudley interviews professor and author Jeffrey Snipes, JD, PhD and Police Organizational Practices consultant. Professor Snipes authored Causes of Crime: Vold’s Theoretical Criminology, and co-authored The Valley of the Shadow of Death, about the 1984 massacre of the family of former NFL star defensive back Kermit Alexander. Listen as they talk about the impact of COVID-19 on reported crime and the potential lasting effects. Will lessons learned from the shelter-in-place orders figure into future policing strategies and policies?

Apr 17 2020

17mins

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Protecting critical infrastructure during a pandemic

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Protecting critical infrastructure is essential during any incident or situation. Considering the ever-changing, daily developments related to the COVID-19 pandemic, good planning is especially valuable right now. Rex Scism speaks with Jim Dudley to describe the essential planning process, priorities, and dealing with county, state and federal governmental agencies. In the follow-up to his article "Protecting critical infrastructure: What your organization can do to weather the storm", Rex further describes planning the continuity of operations for an agency.

Captain Rex M. Scism (Ret) is a 32-year law enforcement veteran and former director of research and development for the Missouri State Highway Patrol. Within that capacity, he was responsible for policy management, organizational accreditation initiatives, and statistical analysis. Mr. Scism also serves as an adjunct faculty member in the Department of Criminal Justice for both Columbia College and the University of Central Missouri. He is a graduate of the FBI National Academy – Session 249, and currently serves as a Content Developer for Lexipol.

Apr 10 2020

18mins

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The hazards of bail reform

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In San Francisco and other cities across America, advocates of accused offenders have called for "cash bail" to be ended, citing economic inequities among offenders. The argument is that the system unfairly keeps accused offenders from low income backgrounds incarcerated while defendants from more wealthy backgrounds walk free on bail. In this podcast segment, Jim and Doug discuss the fact that the idea of bail reform may have some merit—as long as serious, chronic, and violent offenders remain in custody unless they guarantee that they will return to court or show enough investment that they will not commit further acts while out of custody.

Apr 03 2020

12mins

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Preventing police suicide

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In 2019, Blue HELP reported a total of 228 police officers died by suicide. Those are just the suicide deaths that had been documented—it is unclear how many other officers died by suicide that were reported as "a sudden medical emergency" or "single vehicle collision" or simply swept under the rug altogether. In this podcast segment, Jim and Doug discuss how police agencies and individual officers are smashing the stigma of seeking mental or emotional assistance, and how the culture of policing still must continue to evolve to ensure that officers approaching crisis have access to the assistance they need to prevail.

Mar 14 2020

11mins

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PoliceOne's 20th Anniversary

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Two decades ago, a small group of dedicated entrepreneurs set out to create an online resource for law enforcement. In the intervening 20 years, a lot has changed in policing—from new technologies to improved training to more sophisticated patrol vehicles and duty gear. In this podcast segment, Jim and Doug discuss the various events and milestones PoliceOne writers and contributors have noted over the years.

Mar 14 2020

20mins

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Policing amid coronavirus

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COVID-19—also known as coronavirus—may potentially pose a substantial threat to American law enforcement as the disease continues to spread across the country. The most vulnerable to serious illness—and even death—are currently elderly people with a pre-existing weakened immune system. However, the emergence into the national narrative of the worldwide pandemic provides an opportunity to remember that other threats pose a significant danger, and to recall that some simple steps can prevent succumbing to infectious disease. In this podcast segment, Jim and Doug discuss the ways in which officers and agencies can protect themselves from a wide array of infectious diseases carried by individuals they contact when on patrol.

Mar 13 2020

13mins

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First responders and COVID-19

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The coronavirus or COVID-19 pandemic is causing worldwide concern. First responders, whether they be law enforcement, fire or EMS personnel should be aware of the latest developments. Listen in as Jim Dudley interviews Rob Lawrence, PoliceOne's resident health expert, for the latest information on COVID-19.

Members can get up to date information as it is released from the Center for Disease Control at: https://www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly/index.htm

FEMA and the Department of Homeland Security has made information available at:
https://www.dhs.gov/epidemicpandemic https://www.usfa.fema.gov/downloads/pdf/dhs-comprehensive-first-responder-pandemic-guide-pandemic.pdf

Agencies may view the template for Continuity of Operations at:
https://www.fema.gov/pdf/about/org/ncp/pandemic_influenza.pdf

Mar 06 2020

14mins

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The end of gang injunctions?

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Despite their effectiveness in helping police agencies—especially in densely populated urban areas—reduce the threat of criminal gangs to public safety, some places are pulling back on utilizing gang injunctions. For example, in San Francisco, newly elected District Attorney Chesa Boudin has declared that he will end the practice of gang enhancements when pressing charges against known gang members accused of a host of different crimes related to the gang's criminal activities. Gang enhancements have drawn increased opposition in California, driven by a belief among police critics that they are disproportionately applied to people of color in poor neighborhoods.

Feb 28 2020

13mins

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Preparing officers for dealing with offenders trained in MMA

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With the ever-increasing popularity of mixed martial arts as a spectator sport, just about every jurisdiction in America has seen the opening of a training facility—a dojo or a gym—specializing in teaching individuals how to fight in this potentially deadly style of combat. Indeed, many police officers are regulars at these gyms, learning everything from the grappling and submission techniques, hand striking of traditional boxing, and kicks from a variety of martial arts from around the world. In this podcast segment, Jim and Doug discuss the potential threat officers face when dealing with a subject who is trained in this fighting style, as well as the upside—and possible downside—of officers participating in this training.

Feb 21 2020

11mins

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How to form relationships for multi-jurisdictional, multi-disciplinary emergency response

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In large-scale emergencies, police, fire, EMS, and a wide variety of other governmental organizations and private enterprises need to pull together and work as a single organism. At some major catastrophes, you might have city departments such as public works and social services racing to a scene alongside the electric company, the American Red Cross and others. This requires that police leaders and command staff must first establish relationships with those many organizations long in advance of an actual catastrophe. In this podcast segment, Jim and Doug discuss how some of those relationships are formed and maintained over time through communication and shared training exercises.

Feb 14 2020

14mins

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Dissolving police departments

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In late January, the Rio Vista City Council voted to dissolve its police department following the abrupt departure of the police chief, a commander, and a sergeant that left the agency all but gutted. The small city about of roughly 9,000 residents—located approximately 60 miles east of San Francisco—will now receive its police services from the Solano County Sheriff's Office. Rio Vista is not alone. Late last year, the town board in Deposit, New York, held a meeting to discuss with interested citizens the proposal to dissolve their police department. A few months before that, the Ridgetop Police Department in Tennessee suffered a similar fate. The town of Freedom, Wisconsin voted to disband its police department—consisting of two full-time and one part-time sworn officer—last year as well. In this podcast segment, Jim and Doug discuss the shuttering of doors at police agencies, usually in smaller jurisdictions.

Feb 07 2020

14mins

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The hazards of policing in the political season

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This Monday, thousands of the citizens of Iowa will gather in churches, schools, public buildings, and even individuals' homes to try to convince each other who should be the Democratic nominee to face off against incumbent President Donald Trump in November's general election. This election is sure to be a hotly contested one, with passions running high on both sides. In this podcast segment, Jim and Doug discuss the role of law enforcement in the political season.

Jan 31 2020

13mins

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Traffic enforcement strategies: Zero tolerance, high visibility and targeted enforcement

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Traffic enforcement is one of the most common activities for many line officers. Code violations can lead to significant drug busts. Traffic violations can get dangerous drivers to change their ways. DUI check-points save an unknown number of lives. From speed traps to self-initiated stops, it's a big part of policing. But there are different methods that meet different objectives. In this podcast segment, Jim and Doug discuss the various ways law enforcement officers can make the roadways safer.

Jan 24 2020

11mins

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Trauma-informed police interview effectiveness

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Interviewing victims of violent crime is a vastly different enterprise than interrogating the suspected perpetrators. Victims of violent crime—as well as witnesses—are likely to have suffered trauma that can impact their recall of the events. Vital elements may be erased from memory, while they may recall things that aren't precisely what happened. Victims of trauma also often recall events not in the order that they actually occurred, potentially causing an inexperienced interviewer to conclude deceptions. Further, traditional interview techniques can cause the victim to feel re-victimized. In this podcast segment, Jim and Doug discuss how Cognitive Interviewing (CI) can help investigators gather detailed and accurate information from victims of trauma that can lead to an increase in guilty pleas.

Jan 17 2020

12mins

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What do Americans want from their cops?

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Cops must be all things to all people. They're drug counselors, child protectors, criminal investigators, social workers, and enemies of evil. This has been dumbed down in recent years into the debate over whether or not cops are "warriors" or "guardians"—a debate that is rendered meaningless by the use of the word "or." Cops are BOTH of those things and more. In this podcast segment, Jim and Doug discuss how the American people perceive police officers, what they truly want from law enforcement, and frame the conversation within the context of what's happened in recent years in San Francisco, where Jim worked as a law enforcement officer for three decades, and where Doug has called home for nearly two decades.

Jan 10 2020

10mins

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How a Citizens' Police Academy can strengthen community relations

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Many police agencies across the country host an annual (or even more frequent) Citizens' Police Academy with the intention of connecting with the communities they serve and helping to increase understanding among civilians about the ins and outs of law enforcement. Given the fact that there is so much widespread misinformation about what police officers do on a daily basis, this is probably a good strategy for educating the public. What goes into creating such a program? What are the benefits? Who should be the instructors? In this podcast segment, Jim and Doug discuss best practices for putting on a Citizens' Police Academy.

Dec 26 2019

13mins

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iTunes Ratings

78 Ratings
Average Ratings
51
12
5
4
6

Great info

By J.A.E - Jan 20 2018
Read more
This podcast encompasses many relevant topics that a rookie to admin can relate too.

Officer

By Milhail1989 - Apr 22 2016
Read more
Police Officer here, great material for young and salty officers alike. Keep up the good work!