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OPTIMIZE with Brian Johnson | More Wisdom in Less Time

Updated 6 days ago

Business
Careers
Health & Fitness
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OPTIMIZE with Brian Johnson features the best Big Ideas from the best optimal living books. More wisdom in less time to help you live your greatest life.

Read more

OPTIMIZE with Brian Johnson features the best Big Ideas from the best optimal living books. More wisdom in less time to help you live your greatest life.

iTunes Ratings

250 Ratings
Average Ratings
235
6
4
2
3

The best

By Rluna1@NYC - Mar 24 2017
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Brian is my hero because he is so clear and he is all about service to self and others.

Life changing material

By Trust me, Seriously - Nov 28 2016
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Amazing material and truly life changing.

iTunes Ratings

250 Ratings
Average Ratings
235
6
4
2
3

The best

By Rluna1@NYC - Mar 24 2017
Read more
Brian is my hero because he is so clear and he is all about service to self and others.

Life changing material

By Trust me, Seriously - Nov 28 2016
Read more
Amazing material and truly life changing.

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Cover image of OPTIMIZE with Brian Johnson | More Wisdom in Less Time

OPTIMIZE with Brian Johnson | More Wisdom in Less Time

Updated 6 days ago

Read more

OPTIMIZE with Brian Johnson features the best Big Ideas from the best optimal living books. More wisdom in less time to help you live your greatest life.

PNTV: Bright Line Eating by Susan Peirce Thompson

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Susan Peirce Thompson is a Professor of Brain and Cognitive Sciences at the University of Rochester. She’s an expert in the psychology of eating and creator of Bright Line Eating Solutions, “a company dedicated to helping people achieve long-term, sustainable weight loss.” Plus... She used to be obese and, as she says, addicted to *everything.* She integrates her background in neuroscience with her personal experience conquering her diet and other addiction issues in this super popular book. Big Ideas we explore include why bright lines are where it’s at, the susceptibility quiz, the saboteur, self-perception theory, and the four bright lines of eating.

Dec 25 2018

16mins

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PNTV: 12 Rules For Life by Jordan B. Peterson

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Jordan Peterson is one of the world's leading intellectuals. He's a Canadian clinical psychologist and professor at the University of Toronto. (Before that, he taught at Harvard.) He’s published over 100 scientific articles and he’s super-popular on YouTube. This book is wonderfully intense and equally thoughtful. Peterson’s integration of everything from evolutionary psychology, politics, religion and morality is astounding. After taking a super-quick look at all 12 Rules, Big Ideas we cover include the importance of mastering the flow or Order + Chaos (and why RULES are so important), Rule #1 (stand up straight, shoulders back! Remember lobsters...), Rule #2 (Treat yourself better! Remember pets...), Rule #6: Clean up your life (remember to start stopping...), and the fact that your Being is in your Becoming (which is connected to Rule #4...).

Nov 14 2018

13mins

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PNTV: Reinventing Yourself by Steve Chandler

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Here are 5 of my favorite Big Ideas from "Reinventing Yourself" by Steve Chandler. Hope you enjoy! I got this book years ago when I first started working with Steve Chandler. At the time, I read and listened to a ton of his stuff. Steve and I worked together one-on-one for a couple years. This is our sixth Note on his books. It was super fun to reread this book and dive back into Steve’s down-to-earth and empowering wisdom. I love his short, to-the-point, funny style. Big Ideas we explore include the difference between being a Victim vs. an Owner (this is the #1 key on "How to Become the Person You've Always Wanted to Be), lifting real weights not the Styrofoam stuff (but only if you want to get strong!), the fact that Yes lives in the land of No, 10 things you'd do if you had no fear (pick one and go!), and campfires (they're a lot like human spirit--ya gotta re-create one every day!).

Nov 01 2018

13mins

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PNTV: The 4 Disciplines of Execution by Chris McChesney, Jim Huling, and Stephen Covey

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I planned to read this book since Cal Newport referenced it in Deep Work. I finally did so in preparation to teach Productivity 101. It’s fantastic. If you’re a business leader or entrepreneur I think you’ll particularly enjoy it. Big Ideas we cover include the 4DX, the whirlwind, your Wildly Important Goals, Lag vs. Lead measures, the power of keeping score, and avoiding the blackhole of the magnificently trivial.

Nov 24 2017

16mins

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+1 #50: Perfectionist vs. Optimalist

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Speaking of perfectionism, let’s look at the essence of Tal Ben-Shahar’s great book The Pursuit of Perfect. Tal is one of the world’s leading positive psychologists. He taught the largest class in Harvard’s history: Positive Psychology 101. He tells us that there are two distinct forms of perfectionism—one of them is actually adaptive and the other is not. He tells us they are so different that they need different names. There’s the unhealthy perfectionist who suffers from all the things you’d expect from perfectionism: anxiety, depression, etc. He calls them a “Perfectionist.” Then, there’s the healthy, high-functioning perfectionist who uses those high standards to fuel their growth. He calls them an “Optimalist.” Perfectionist vs. Optimalist. Here’s the primary difference between the two: The (unhealthy) Perfectionist fails to embrace reality. They actually think they can work for 16 hours a day in pursuit of their great work while staying super healthy and being a great spouse and parent and being super active in the community and a great friend to dozens and... (I get stressed just typing that.) The source of their misery is the fact that they fail to embrace the constraints of reality. They simply CAN’T do all of those things. So, when they inevitably fall short of their expectations, they beat themselves up mercilessly and experience all the negative effects of unhealthy perfectionism. The (healthy) Optimalist? They have really high standards and want to be a great creator, spouse, parent, friend and vital human but they rub their vision up against reality. They see only so many hours in a day and construct their optimal life within the boundaries of those healthy constraints. Note: The word “optimal” is derived from the Latin optimus which means the “best”--not the “perfect.” The best. The best within the constraints of our individual realities. Do you tend to be a Perfectionist or an Optimalist? How can you hold your high standards AND embrace the constraints of reality just a little more today? +1.

Nov 12 2017

4mins

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Interview: Digital Minimalism with Cal Newport

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Feb 02 2019

42mins

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+1 #60: Never Waste a Mis-take

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Have you ever made a mistake? (Hah.) Right. (I’ve made a mistake or 3 million as well.) Here’s the deal: When we approach it with the right mindset (that would be a growth, experimental mindset), we come to realize that those mistakes are P R E C I O U S. The data we get on what DOESN’T WORK is priceless. Therefore, never (!) beat yourself up about a mis-take. Simply remind yourself that we either win or we learn and that no movie was ever shot from start to finish without a ton of re-takes. Then say to yourself “Needs work!” as you rewind your game film, see yourself executing the oopsed scene perfectly and then get back at it. Repeat. Forever. So… Practical Reflection Time: What was your last mistake? What did you learn? Run it through our little Mis-take process above and +1 it.

Nov 15 2017

3mins

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PNTV: The Effective Executive by Peter F. Drucker

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Peter Drucker is considered the father of modern management. This book was originally published in 1967. It’s *remarkably* well written and lucid. And, of course, packed with Big Ideas on how to optimize our effectiveness. We cover the 5 key practices/habits of the effective executive: time (first things first; second things never!), contribution (what can you contribute?), strengths (make yours productive; make weaknesses irrelevant), concentration (the secret to effectiveness), decisions (boundary conditions help).

Nov 27 2017

19mins

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Interview: Be Unstoppable with Alden Mills

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This is a surprisingly awesome book—a fable about a young captain who spends time with a master and commander who reveals the secret code of rockin’ it. It’s kinda like if a Navy SEAL wrote The Alchemist or The Way of the Peaceful Warrior or The Monk Who Sold His Ferrari. Big Ideas we cover include: U.P.E.R.S.I.S.T. (the code to being unstoppable), the 2 limitations in life, how to discover your why, how to plan in 3-D, and the magic pill you need to take.

Jul 16 2016

31mins

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+1: #585 You and the Swami Spartan

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Continuing our theme of wisdom gleaned from Zen Optimize in the Art of Spartan Racing, let’s talk about spiritual obstacle course racer, Sri Swami Satchidananda.   Sri Swami Satchidananda was an obstacle course racer?    Well, yah!   Satchidananda was one of the most revered Yoga Masters of the 20th century. He wrote a great book called The Golden Present. It’s one of those books that has a chapter for each day of the year so you can work through the wisdom and create your greatest year ever.   Guess what wisdom he shared in Chapter #1, January 1st?    … What wisdom do you think he thought was most important to kick off your year strong?    Quick answer: How to see life as one big obstacle course.   Longer answer, in his words: “Life must be a challenge. Only then is it exciting. In an obstacle race, you are forced to surmount all the obstacles: to jump over the hurdles, go through the barrels, crawl under the rugs, climb over walls.What would happen if, to avoid all that, you went around all the obstacles and asked for the winner’s cup? Would they give it to you? No. They would say, ‘You must go back and face all the obstacles.’... Make your life as exciting as possible, but always think of it as fun. The adversities as well as the harmony should be enjoyable. Don’t become sober and morose and have a castor oil face in the name of spirituality. Just be happy. Jump with joy. Even if you make a mistake, say, ‘Hey, I did this? Great! What a wonderful lesson I learned!’ If you really want to, you can make everything fun.”   Amen and high fives, Swami!!!   That’s PRECISELY why my sport-hobby involves me PAYING to go over and under and through obstacles so I really get the sports-metaphor that so perfectly captures the essence of life.   So…    Today’s +1.   Two key things.   
  1. Make your life as exciting (and challenging!) as possible.
  2. And always think of it as FUN!!!
  Friendly Optimizing reminder: Life is one big, preciously brief game.    As India.Arie says,    If you create the game then you create the rules And if you just be you There's no way you can lose   So…   Get out there and have fun.    Jump with joy—right over any and all obstacles you face today!

Nov 11 2018

3mins

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Micro Class: How to Grow Your Grit

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Here are the four psychological assets you need to grow your grit: Interest + Practice + Purpose + Hope.

Sep 30 2016

6mins

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Micro Class: Influence Yourself

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Want to influence yourself? Tap into your natural tendency to want consistency. Here's a quick look at how to do that. (Hint: Start small. Write down your commitment. Share your it.)

Nov 29 2016

7mins

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Stoicism 101: How to Apply the Ancient Wisdom of Seneca, Epictetus and Marcus Aurelius to Your Modern Life (Intro)

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I love Stoicism. In this class we take a quick look at the cast of characters (from founder Zeno to Seneca + Epictetus + Marcus Aurelius) and then dive into the ultimate goal of Stoicism (hint: become bff’s with your inner daimon so you can experience a state of well-being and flourishing) along with the practices that help us apply this wisdom to our lives. We’ll create energized tranquility and equanimity as we have fun becoming our own ideal sages.

Feb 25 2017

7mins

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+1: #325 The Psychology of Hope

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Rick Snyder was the founder of research into the science of hope. And, he was one of the pioneers of the positive psychology movement. In fact, he literally wrote the textbook on “Positive Psychology.”   He documented just how important hope is to our overall well-being and tells us that there are three primary components to having high hope: Goals + Willpower + Waypower.   It all starts with a Goal. Happy people have projects. And, happy, hopeful people have GOALS! They have a future they’re excited about.   Then we have what Rick calls “Willpower.” In this context, Rick tells us that Willpower is that spark of determination that says, “We’ve got this!!” It needs to be there in the beginning AND it needs be there after you get knocked down a few times. (Rick’s protege Shane Lopez described this as “Agency” — a sense of personal power that we have what it takes to make our dreams a reality.)   Then we have what Rick calls “Waypower.” Waypower is all about mapping out the plans for how you will attain your goal along with the wisdom to know that your first plan probably won’t work out perfectly — requiring you to continue optimizing your strategy while pursuing different routes to your goal. (Shane Lopez called this “Pathways.”)   So, again: Goals + Willpower +  Waypower.   To be high hope, we need to have all three of those Optimized. It’s obviously not enough to have Goals without Willpower or Waypower. But it’s also not enough to have Goals and Willpower but not have the Waypower. You could be really fired up and really believe you can crush it but… If you’re not also doing the planning to find all the routes to your goal, your hope will take a hit.    Today’s +1. Let’s do a quick check in on the status of your hope.   Do you have specific, meaningful, and challenging yet doable Goals?    Do you have a spark of determination or “Willpower” that gives you the confidence that you can achieve your Goals and helps you move through the inevitable obstacles you’ll face along the way?    And, do you have a plan on how you can achieve your Goals (and a willingness to constantly tweak that plan as you get feedback from the world) via a strong sense of “Waypower”?    Once more: Goals + Willpower +  Waypower.   Where are you strong? What needs work?   Here’s to cultivating your resilient, grounded, yet high hope day in and day out — especially (!) when you don’t feel like it.    P.S. Remember: If your basic fundamentals aren’t Optimized there’s no way you’ll be able to get yourself into that high-hope state consistently. Eating, moving, and sleeping well? That’s THE best way to boost your hope. Period.

Feb 24 2018

5mins

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+1: #570 Champ Champ Champ

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In our last +1, we talked about my quest to be a Spartan champion in 2025 and how that’s resulted in a lot of WINing TODAY. (How’re your goals-systems?!)   Today I want to talk about being a Champ Champ Champ.    ← I laugh as I type that.    Note: This +1 is a bit ridiculous.    So…    Quick context: After one of the best mixed martial arts coaches in the world (Firas Zahabi, owner of Tristar gym and Georges St Pierre’s coach) became an Optimizer then sent a note telling me how much he loved the PhilosophersNotes (thanks, Firas!), I learned more about Firas and his mastery of his craft and, in the process, paid more attention to the UFC.   In the process, I stumbled across Conor McGregor before he was the superstar he is today. It’s cliché to say that I could see that he had a spark of something different about him but, well, he did. And, he does.   While embracing Maslow’s wisdom that there are no perfect human beings, I’ve enjoyed watching his entertaining, charismatic rise to superstardom.   Short story for those who may not know: Conor McGregor is an Irish mixed martial arts (MMA) fighter who is the first person in the premier “league” of MMA (the UFC) to win championships in TWO weight classes. It’s a pretty impressive feat. It’s especially impressive and inspiring because he went from being an apprentice plumber to a kid with a dream receiving welfare checks to winning those two world championships and making something like $100 million in his first professional boxing match against one of the all-time greats.   Now, in addition to being a great fighter, Conor is also a great promoter.    All of which brings us closer to Today’s +1.   After winning the two championships, he took to calling himself “Champ Champ.” I laugh as I type that as it’s so wonderfully ridiculous. “Champ Champ.” (Hah.)   So…   As I’ve been stepping up my athlētē game, I’ve been having fun with different mantras during my meditation, during training and during everyday life. Optimus is one of my favorite ways to focus my energy on being my best. I also like “World-Class.” And, as the bar has moved up, “World-Champion” might have been getting some airtime in my head.   Of course, my athletic goals are really just a means to Optimize my Energy which is really just a means to Optimize my Work and my Love so I’ve been having fun playing with different ways to capture all Big 3 commitments in one mantra.   That’s when “Champ Champ Champ” popped into my head.   ← I laugh as I type that and I laughed when it first appeared in my head. (Which I take as a very good sign.)   Yep. That’s the standard. A World-Class → World-Champion Athlētē AND a World-Class → “World-Champion” Husband and Father AND a World-Class → “World-Champion” Philosopher-Teacher-Leader.   That’s like me.   Champ Champ Champ.   How about you?   What’s the best version of YOU look like Energy + Work + Love-wise?!   Any fun ways to bring your commitments to life?

Oct 27 2018

4mins

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+1: #625 Unfortunate vs. Unforgivable

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Today I’d like to talk about a little more wisdom from Seth Godin’s Icarus Deception.    As we’ve discussed, his book (and his entire body of work for that matter), is basically a plea for us to step up and into our highest potential.    He tells us: “Your ability to follow directions is not the secret to your success. You are hiding your best work, your best insight, and your best self from us every day.”   That’s inspiringly true.    (Note the references to “your best,”your best,your best.” And, think: Optimus, optimus, optimus.)   But here’s the passage that’s been rattling around in my head: “It’s too bad that so much time has been wasted, but it would be unforgivable to wait any longer. You have the ability to contribute so much. We need you, now.”   It’s funny because when I recalled that passage in my head, I thought he said, “It’s unfortunate that so much time has been wasted. But it would be unforgivable to wait any longer.”   Unfortunate vs. Unforgivable. Unfortunate vs. Unforgivable. Unfortunate vs. Unforgivable.   That’s the phrase that’s been bubbling up for me…   Yah. It’s a bit of a bummer we’ve wasted so many years (or decades!) living at less than our best. (“Gosh darnit!! GAH!!! Oh, to have that time back!!!”)   Yet…   As UNFORTUNATE as that wasted time is, it’s UNFORGIVABLE to wait any longer.   So, let’s capitalize all the lessons learned and GET BUSY GIVING OUR BEST SELVES MOST FULLY TO THE WORLD.   How might you do that just a little more today?   Remember: Unfortunate vs. Unforgivable.    And give us what you’ve got!!

Dec 21 2018

2mins

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Micro Class: Procrastipain

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Did you know thinking about things we procrastinate about triggers a pain response in our brains? Yep. But get this - Only the *anticipation* creates pain; doing doesn't! So, just do it.

Nov 18 2016

5mins

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Micro Class: The Big 7

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Here are Neil Pasricha's 7 favorite scientifically proven ways to boost our happiness.

Oct 07 2016

6mins

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PNTV: The Happiness Diet by Tyler Graham and Drew Ramsey, MD

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What if happiness began at the end of your fork? The latest research on neuroscience and nutrition tells us that’s a VERY wise place to start. And, of course, that’s what this book is all about: A Nutritional Prescription for a Sharp Brain, Balanced Mood, and Lean, Energized Body. It’s a really well-written, eye-opening look at how we got into the nutritional mess we’re in and the extremely damaging effects of the modern American diet. And, of course, more importantly, how we can optimize our nutrition so we can dial in the three facets of happiness: our focus, our mood, and our energy.

Aug 08 2016

17mins

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PNTV: Discourses by Epictetus

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Epictetus is known as one of the world’s leading Stoic philosophers. (Along with Seneca and Marcus Aurelius, the three make up a very interesting bunch.) Epictetus was a former slave turned philosopher who lived from 55-135 (a little later than Seneca and before Aurelius). This book is a transcription of the informal lectures Epictetus gave to his students. It’s awesome. Big Ideas we explore: why Hercules needed challenges (and so do you), what figs can teach us about greatness, the good + the bad + the indifferent and how to tell the difference, “impressions” and the tricks they play, and the fact NOW is the time to live this stuff.

Sep 05 2016

19mins

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+1: #977 Start Strong!

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In our last +1, we talked about the importance of finishing strong. I shared a bit about the origin story of my first business, eteamz. It probably sounded like all sunshines and rainbows. Of course, it wasn’t.   It also probably sounded like a really cool idea!    Build technology that would power the millions of teams involved in youth sports? Awesome!   Only…   Before we got lucky enough to raise that $5 million and hire the CEO of adidas and all that in pursuit of finishing strong, I had to START the darn thing.   I can remember a chat I had at THAT stage of the business just as vividly as the one from the end.    Picture this: I’m 24. I recently dropped out of law school. I have an idea: I want to help get 1 MILLION (!!!) teams online within 5 years.   A friend of mine’s dad happened to be the chairman of the board for a very large public company. I was lucky enough to get a few minutes of his time.    I shared my idea. (I smile imagining my raw enthusiasm at that age!)   You know what he says?   He basically laughs and says something along the lines of, “Well… First of all, you’re violating the first rule of business: There’s no real need here. None of these teams are using the web for any of that.”   Me: “Gulp.”   Him: “Further, you have absolutely no business experience, network or money so how in the world do you think YOU can make this happen?”   Me: “Gulpx2.”   Him: “If you think you can make that happen, well, take another hit off that pipe.”   Me: “Gulpx3.”   I kid you not. That was basically what he told me.   But, for whatever reason, I just KNEW (goosebumps as I typed that) that in a matter of time EVERY SINGLE team and league in the world would be using the web for everything. I could SEE a million teams using our platform within five years.   And… I went for it.    And… We got to a million teams within THREE years.    Of course, over the last twenty years, I’ve had WAY more projects NOT work out the way I hoped than those that did (including the ultimate fate of eteamz) but…   Today’s +1.   Are there any Starting Lines you need to get to in your life?   Yah?   Which one?   I’ll see ya there. Let’s run that race together.   +1. +1. +1.

Dec 08 2019

3mins

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+1: #976 Finish Strong

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As we’ve discussed a few times, I went to UCLA. First generation college student. Studied Psychology and Business.    I was recruited by the old Arthur Andersen which, at the time, was the largest professional services firm in the world—which seemed like a pretty exciting place for me (the son of a guy who worked in a grocery store for 40 years) to start my career.    Except… It wasn’t. (Hah.)   I still think I hold the record for most service lines in the shortest period of time. I started in audit, went to tax. Then to financial planning and finally to business consulting. All in the span of about a year. I knew none of that was for me. (In fact, I was so clear about that fact that I actually pulled over on the side of the 405 driving home the first week of my professional career and… threw up. Funny now. Not so funny then.)   As part of my escape plan, I studied for the LSAT. Went to law school at UC Berkeley. (Class of 2000!) But… I knew that wasn’t for me either. Dropped out. Moved back in with mom at 23. (Thanks again, mom!)   The only thing I knew I wanted to do at that stage of my young life (beyond burning my résumé) was to coach a Little League Baseball team. So, that’s what I did.    Long story a little shorter, while coaching these kids I had an idea. This was 1998. Nobody was online yet but I could see a future where EVERY single team and league in the world would be using the web for everything—pictures of the game Grandma and Grandpa could check out if they couldn’t make it, schedules, standings, etc. Kinda like an ESPN for youth sports.   So… I partnered with the genius little brother of the woman I was dating at the time and we created the technology that Little League Baseball itself wound up using years later.    We wound up doing some cool stuff with that business (called eteamz). We won the business plan competition at UCLA’s Anderson School, raised $5 million from venture capitalists and… We hired the CEO of adidas to replace me as the 25-year-old CEO.   Which gets us one step closer to the point of this +1.   I vividly remember picking our new CEO (Steve Wynne; not to be confused with the Vegas guy) up from LAX. We’d drive together from the airport to our (laughing as I type this), ridiculously awesome offices in Westwood (complete with the requisite ping pong table boardroom, and more games than you can throw a dart at).   We just so happened to bring Steve on right when the market did its thing in 2000. So… Rather than go out and raise our next $20m we wound up bringing in an investment bank and selling our business to one of our two competitors who had raised $50m to our $5m.   All of which brings us to the point of Today’s +1.   In the middle of that extraordinarily (!) stressful time (flashbacks to pain! lol), Steve tattooed some wisdom on my consciousness that has been with me since.   He said, “It’s not how you START something, it’s how you FINISH it.”    “It’s really easy to start something,” he said. “It’s a heck of a lot harder to finish it strong.”   Of course, there are times when deciding to stop doing something is the right move. (See: My decision to drop out of law school, etc.)   And…   There are other times to remember that it’s really easy to start something and a lot harder to finish it.    That’s Today’s +1.   Got any Finish Lines you need to hit?   And/or: Any graceful exit-quits so you can reboot and start again even stronger?   Only you can know which one’s calling you. Let’s create some stillness to create the clarity and go do what needs to get done.   TODAY.

Dec 07 2019

5mins

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+1: #975 The Tenth of an Inch

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We talk a lot about the futility of arguing with reality.   As Byron Katie so perfectly says, “When I argue with reality I lose. But only 100% of the time.” (Hah.)   Today we’re going to take another look at that wisdom from a slightly different angle.   We’ll invite a couple of modern Zen Masters to the party: Joko Beck and Phil Jackson.   We’ll start with legendary basketball coach Phil Jackson’s wisdom. In his book Sacred Hoops, he tells us: “In Zen it is said that the gap between accepting things the way they are and wishing them to be otherwise is ‘the tenth of an inch of difference between heaven and hell.’ If we can accept whatever we’ve been dealt—no matter how unwelcome—the way to proceed eventually becomes clear. This is what is meant by right action: the capacity to observe what’s happening and act appropriately, without being distracted by self-centered thoughts. If we rage and resist, our angry, fearful minds have trouble quieting down sufficiently to allow us to act in the most beneficial way for ourselves and others.”   Thank you, Phil.   Now for Joko Beck. In Everyday Zen, she tells us: “If we require that life be a certain way, inevitably we suffer—since life is always the way it is, and not always fair, not always pleasant. Life is not particularly the way we want it to be, it is just the way it is. And that need not prevent our enjoyment of it, our appreciation, our gratitude.”   That’s Today’s +1.   When/if we find ourselves a little (or a lot annoyed) Today—whether that’s with our kids or our colleagues or ourselves—let’s see if we can step back and notice the gap between what’s happening in the moment and what we want to be happening in the moment.   That tenth of an inch?   Let’s close it.   -1. -1. -1. for the +1 win!   P.S. If you’re getting all crazy-ragey? Well, you just fell into a mile-long chasm between reality and your fantasy of what should be happening. Good news? Just snap your fingers, love what it is and that gap magically vanishes.

Dec 06 2019

2mins

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+1: #965 Asking for Qualities

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In our last +1, we spent some time with Todd Herman, Batman, Dora the Explorer and YOUR most heroic self.   Today we’re going to connect all that goodness to wisdom from the classic peak-performance book The Inner Game of Tennis by Tim Gallwey.   Here’s how he puts it: “‘Asking for qualities’ describes the other kind of role-playing. When introducing this idea, I usually say something like this: ‘Imagine that I am the director of a television series. Knowing that you are an actor that plays tennis, I ask if you would like to do a bit part as a top-flight tennis player. I assure you that you needn’t worry about hitting the ball out or into the net because the camera will only be focused on you and will not follow the ball. What I’m mainly interested in is that you adopt professional mannerisms, and that you swing your racket with super self-assurance. Above all, your face must express no self-doubt. You should look as if you are hitting every ball exactly where you want to. Really get into the role, hit as hard as you like and ignore where the ball is actually going.”   “Asking for qualities.”   That’s one of Gallwey’s three practices for communicating with what he calls Self 2—which is basically your Optimus-best self that innately knows how to crush it if we’d simply get out of our own way.    (The other two practices? Letting go of judgments and the art of creating images of the outcomes you want to see.)   Today we’re going to walk onto the set of the movie that is our lives.   You’re the star. (Go you!)   (Well, technically, we’re ALL just bit players in the game of life so perhaps we should adopt that view, eh?)   So…   What roles are you playing these days?    (Perhaps you can use the Big 3 Identities for Energy + Work + Love.)   Now…   How would you show up in your life if you acted like a top-flight pro in your given field, adopted professional mannerisms and did your thing with super self-assurance—with no doubt and pure confidence?   Let’s ACT LIKE THAT.   Today.   Seriously.   How would you walk, talk, breathe and be if you were acting like the best possible version of yourself?    Be that.   And let’s watch our performance (and enjoyment) soar.

Nov 26 2019

3mins

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+1: #960 Capturing a Richer Mindset

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In our last +1, we revisited Ellen Langer at her “Psychology of Possibility” lab at Harvard to learn that words matter.    As you may recall, simply priming people with words associated with old age (via a crossword puzzle!) will cause them to walk more slowly to the elevator than those who weren’t primed with those words.   *rubs eyes*   One more time: Astonishing, eh?    And…   One more time: WORDS MATTER. A lot.   Langer shares that study and wisdom in her book Counterclockwise in a section in which she also talks about “placebos” and other truly fascinating studies.   Here’s how she puts it: “When we see mind and body as parts of a single entity, the research on placebos takes on new meaning and suggests we can not only control much of our disease experience, but we may also be able to extend our ability to gain, recover, or enhance our health.Placebos often come in the form of a single word that captures a richer mindset. In one study I conducted with my students, we explored the mindset most of us have regarding excellent vision air force pilots have. All participants were given a vision test. One group of participants were then encouraged to role-play ‘air force pilots.’ They dressed the part and, in uniform, sat in a flight simulator. They were asked to read the letters on the wing of a nearby plane, which were actually part of an eye chart. Those participants who adopted the ‘pilot’ mindset, primed to have excellent vision, showed improved vision over those who were simulating being in the simulator and simply asked to read an eye chart from the same distance.”   WHAT?!   Just having people pretend that they’re air force pilots can improve their vision?   SERIOUSLY?   Yes.   That’s Today’s +1.   What’s YOUR “single word that captures a richer mindset”?   Let’s pop that mantra-placebo word all day Today.   And, if you feel so inspired, why not even dress the part as well?

Nov 21 2019

3mins

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+1: #955 Falling on Your Butt

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Geoff Colvin’s Talent Is Overrated is a great book.   It falls into the “Effort Counts Twice” / Deliberate Practice bucket of how to reach our Peak via Grit, etc.   It’s packed with great stories about, as per the sub-title of the book: “What Really Separates World-Class Performers from Everybody Else.”   (Here’s a short hint to the answer: “No matter who they were, or what explanation of their performance was being advanced, it always took them many years to become excellent, and if a person achieves elite status only after many years of toil, assigning the principal role in that success to innate gifts becomes problematic, to say the least.”)   (Note: That doesn’t mean Talent Is IRRELEVANT, just OVERRATED when compared to extraordinarily hard work. Again: See Effort Counts Twice for Angela Duckworth’s math on the subject!)   So…   Today I want to share one of my favorite stories from that book.   Here it is.   Colvin tells us: “A study of figure skaters found that sub-elite skaters spent lots of time working on the jumps they could already do, while skaters at the highest levels spent more time on the jumps they couldn’t do, the kind that ultimately win Olympic medals and that involve lots of falling down before they’re mastered.”   (Aha! Stretching out of our comfort zones into our stretch zones (but not into our panic zones!) for the win!)   Colvin then tells the story of Shizuka Arakawa, who won the gold medal in figure skating at the 2006 Winter Olympics in Turin, Italy.    As you may know, she rocked some crazy move called “a layback Ina Bauer” — which basically required her to bend backward “almost double with the feet pointing in opposite directions — leading into a three-jump combination.”   You can watch her gold-medal winning performance here.    (Note1: The move we’re talking about occurs at the 1:45 mark.)   (Note2: If you aren’t moved to tears of joy as you watch such a beautiful expression of human excellence then…. well… I don’t know what to say other than rewatch it?!)   Now…. When most of us watch something like that it simply looks IMPOSSIBLE to do. (And, for most of us, it pretty much is.)    But… As we watch that performance in AWE, we would be wise to remember that Shizuka, who won the gold at twenty-four, had been training for NINETEEN years.    NINETEEN years!!    Consistently pushing her edges.    Falling down again and again and again...   In fact, Colvin calculated the number of times she probably fell and says: “Landing on your butt twenty thousand times is where great performance comes from.”   And… That’s Today’s +1.   Ineffably elegant grace?   It’s the by-product of being willing to inelegantly fall on your butt (on cold ice, no less!) 20,000 (!!) times.   Olympic cameras back on you.   Let’s cruise back into our respective metaphorical ice-skating rinks to train like world-class performers as we wear our falls like medals and remember this parting wisdom from Colvin: The evidence offers no easy assurances. It shows that the price of top-level achievement is extraordinarily high. Perhaps it’s inevitable that not many people will choose to pay it. But the evidence shows also that by understanding how a few become great, anyone can become better. Above all, what the evidence shouts most loudly is striking, liberating news: that great performance is not reserved for the pre-ordained few. It is available to you and to everyone.”

Nov 16 2019

5mins

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Optimize Interview: The Alter Ego Effect with Todd Herman

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Virtues > Behaviors model. Big Ideas we explore include Superman + Clark Kent (who's who?), activating your Heroic Self (the science of), motivation and emotion (share a common Latin root), virtues as super powers (more on the science of), and Crossing the Threshold (Today the day?)."}" data-sheets-userformat= "{"2":769,"3":{"1":0},"11":3,"12":0}"> The Alter Ego Effect. This is one of the most fun and compelling and inspiring books I’ve read in awhile. I REALLY (!!!) enjoyed reading it, had a ton of fun constructing and playing with some potential Alter Egos and highly recommend it. I also really enjoyed how high-performance coach and mental game strategist Todd Herman describes the science behind the power of “secret identities” to transform our lives and I loved the parallels between his perspective and our Big 3 Identities > Virtues > Behaviors model. Big Ideas we explore include Superman + Clark Kent (who's who?), activating your Heroic Self (the science of), motivation and emotion (share a common Latin root), virtues as super powers (more on the science of), and Crossing the Threshold (Today the day?).

Nov 14 2019

56mins

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+1: #950 Natural Born Heroes

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The other day I found myself re-reading our Notes on Christopher McDougall’s great book Natural Born Heroes.   Although we’ve talked (many times) about the fact that the ancient word for hero literally meant “protector,” I realized that (somehow!) I’ve never shared McDougall’s brilliant wisdom that catalyzed my emphasis on the whole idea of all of us becoming modern heroes.   So…   Let’s take a quick look at how McDougall so wisely puts it.   He tells us: And what Plutarch taught them is this: Heroes care. True heroism, as the ancients understood, isn’t about strength, or boldness, or even courage. It’s about compassion.When the Greeks created the heroic ideal, they didn’t choose a word that mean ‘Dies Trying’ or ‘Massacres Bad Guy.’ They went with hērōs—‘protector.’ Heroes aren’t perfect; with a god as one parent and a mortal as the other, they’re perpetually teetering between two destinies. What tips them toward greatness is a sidekick, a human connection who helps turn the spigot on the power of compassion. Empathy, the Greeks believed, was a source of strength, not softness; the more you recognized yourself in others and connected with their distress, the more endurance, wisdom, cunning, and determination you could tap into.”   That’s Today’s +1.   Heroes care.   It’s that simple.   And…   As aspiring modern heroes, we demonstrate that love and compassion by building the strength for two.   So…   For whom do YOU aspire to have strength?   And…   How will you build just a little more strength Today?   Plus…   How can you use the strength you have in service to the world just a little more Today?   Modern Hērōs unite!!   Let’s do this.

Nov 11 2019

1hr 10mins

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Optimize Interview: The Passion Paradox with Brad Stulberg

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Brad Stulberg writes, coaches, and speaks on health and human performance. Steve Magness coaches some of the world’s top distance runners and has propelled numerous athletes to Olympic trials, world championship teams, and the Olympics. This is the second book they’ve written together. We featured the first one Peak Performance. When this book came out, Brad reached out to let me know I might enjoy it. I immediately got it, immediately read it and, well, here we are. He was right. I loved it. Big Ideas we explore include the fact that passion needs to be handled with care, the "fit mind-set" (vs. the mastery mind-set), two kinds of passion (obsessive vs. harmonious), the mastery mindset (secret sauce #1) and self-awareness (secret sauce #2).

Nov 07 2019

46mins

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+1: #945 Thank You. Thank You. Thank You.

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As we’ve discussed, a mantra is literally “a tool of the mind.”   By repeating a mantra over and over and over again (spiritual teachers say!), it takes hold in our subconscious and subtly shapes our mind.   Eknath Easwaran is a huge fan and advocate of mantras. He sold me on their power years ago and I’ve experimented with many but I haven’t really found one that stuck.    Until now…   I think I might have found my new go-to mantra.   Here it is: “Thank you.”   As in: “Thank You. Thank You. Thank You.”   Followed by: “Thank You. Thank You. Thank You. Thank You. Thank You. Thank You.”   Followed up by: “Thank You. Thank You. Thank You. Thank You. Thank You. Thank You. Thank You. Thank You. Thank You.”   Repeat.   Especially when you find yourself triggered by something (or someone).   “Thank You. Thank You. Thank You.” “Thank You. Thank You. Thank You.” “Thank You. Thank You. Thank You.”   It’s kinda weird what happens when I do that.   I go from feeling stressed/annoyed/whatever to feeling truly GRATEFUL.   I don’t even have to do anything other than kickstart the mantra. After a few reps, my mind comes up with things for which I can be grateful in the midst of whatever might be challenging me.   Gratitude just kinda bubbles up.    Bubbles of gratitude like: “Thank you for the challenge itself—which is giving me the opportunity to actually practice these ideas.” “Thank you for all the amazing things you have done for me, o’ person who is currently pushing my buttons.” Etc. Etc. Etc.   It’s almost weird how powerful it is.    Perhaps that’s why Meister Eckhart once said: “If the only prayer you said was thank you, that would be enough.”   That’s Today’s +1.   Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you.  Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you.

Nov 06 2019

1hr 10mins

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+1: #940 Stress Curfews

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Not too long ago, we talked about Sleep Curfews. Five of them, to be precise.    One for Caffeine. Another for Exercise. Plus Eating. Plus Screens. Plus Work.   As you may recall, Caffeine has a half-life of 5 to 6 hours so try to cut back on that by around noon or 2 or whatever you find works best for you.    Exercise late in the day gets your core temperature all jacked up when it should be mellowing out, so aim for at least 3 hours before bedtime. (And, remember that exercise also gives you a 12-hour mood boost so might as well pop a happy pill early in the day, eh?)   Eating was a fun one. The standard advice is to eat at least 2 hours before bedtime. (And def don’t snack right before/in the middle of the night.) Want to go gonzo with the glymph? Eat at least 4 (FOUR!) hours before bedtime.    Then we have Screens. Again, turn off the screens AT LEAST an hour before bed. More if you’re feeling it.   Finally, we had a Work “shut-down complete” target. We left that one up to you and I said mine was no later than 5:00 pm.   So…   Today I want to add a new curfew. Let’s call it the “Stress Curfew.”   I violated this one the other day and, as I found myself wide awake (over)thinking in the middle of the night, I vowed to use the data as wisely as possible to recommit to some bright lines as I Optimized. (I almost gave myself a mistake-learner’s high I was so buzzing.) (Almost.) (lol)   Technically, you could say I violated BOTH my digital sunset Screen Curfew AND my shut-down complete Work Curfew when I was using Alexandra’s phone to work on a (somewhat intense) business issue way past my normal 5:00 pm curfews.    Now, it was only 6:45 pm when I put down the phone but that’s an hour before I usually go to bed (laughing at myself; who does that?) and a couple/few hours later than I usually do that kind of work so my brain was hopping WAY (!) more than it usually is that late in the day.   Enter: That poor night of sleep and a poor Oura readiness score to show for it.    Good news: I rebounded from the 83 readiness score to back-to-back 95’s with an even deeper appreciation for just how much the seemingly little things matter. (Marginal gains!!)   The lesson for me: There are VERY few things that are that important that they can’t wait until the next day to be addressed. And… I’m MUCH more likely to be able to solve them wisely when I’m well-rested. THEREFORE, honor your curfews, yo!   That’s Today’s +1.   Do YOU have a Stress Curfew?   (Should you?)

Nov 01 2019

3mins

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Optimize Interview: The Power of Agency with Paul Napper & Anthony Rao

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Agency. It’s one of my favorite words and psychological concepts (and a cornerstone of our Optimize Coach program). So, when I saw this book I immediately got it and read it and here we are. Paul Napper and Anthony Rao are leading consultants and clinicians (who have both held academic positions at Harvard Medical School). In their great book, they define agency as “the ability to act as an effective agent for yourself—reflecting, making creative choices, and constructing a meaningful life.” Then they provide practical, scientifically-grounded wisdom on, as per the sub-title of the book: “The 7 Principles to Conquer Obstacles, Make Effective Decisions, and Create a Life on Your Own Terms.” In this Note, we take a quick look at the 7 principles and shine a spotlight on the first 3 with a focus on how we can Optimize our agency TODAY!!

Oct 31 2019

33mins

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+1: #935 The Eternal Feast

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In our last +1, we talked about A World Without Heroes and the fact that “A hero sacrifices for the greater good. A hero is true to his or her conscience. In short, heroism means doing the right thing regardless of the consequences.”   Then we challenged ourselves to choose THIS DAY (!) to be one of them.   Today we’re going to talk about some more brilliant metaphorical wisdom from Brandon Mull’s wonderful storytelling mind.   Quick context: In Beyonders, our main characters gets transported to another world. In that world, an evil Emperor reigns. Few people have chosen to stand up to the Emperor. Those who look like they might be significant threats are harassed and, if they’re lucky, get invited to a place called Harthenham to enjoy the “Eternal Feast.”   Basically, this is a place where you have ZERO issues. A place where you can enjoy all the most indulgent foods and pleasures you can imagine—where you have no worries at all and can literally live better than a king who has to worry about his kingdom.   When presented with an invitation to Harthenham, many heroes give up their quest and cash in their ticket to the Eternal Feast—where they proceed to waste away the rest of their lives.   I’ll save the spoiler alert about what happens with our young hero. Today we’ll focus on the brilliant metaphorical representation of OUR desires to get to a place where WE have no further toil or challenges.    The Eternal Feast.   (Doesn’t that sound scrumptiously inviting?!)   We have a word for that.    Exoneration.    (Thanks, Phil + Barry!)   Wouldn’t it be so amazing to no longer have to work so.darn.hard?   No more bills to pay. Kids to feed. Laundry to fold.   No more (often) overwhelming creative challenges. Or health issues. Or, well, ANY problems at all?   Ahhh…   Wouldn’t that be SO NICE?!   Insert: Laughter.   Plus: More laughter.   Hah.   Reminder: We will NEVER (!) be exonerated from challenges.   And, the sooner we get that fact (and remember it when we forget it) the faster we’ll reduce the “Resistance” part of the “Suffering = Pain x Resistance” equation as we get back to practicing the ancient art of acquiescence and the modern art of loving what is.   That’s Today’s +1.   Let’s reject our invitation to the Eternal Feast.   And get back to serving the greater good.   Heroically.    Today.   (And tomorrow. And…)

Oct 27 2019

3mins

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Optimize Interview: Stillness is the Key with Ryan Holiday

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Ryan is one of my absolute favorite writers and I'm excited to sit down with him to chat about his latest book, Stillness is the Key. One of the testimonials in the front of the book perfectly captures my sentiment. Screenwriter and director Brian Koppelman (Rounders, Ocean’s Thirteen and Billions) puts it this way: “I don’t have many rules in life, but one I never break is: If Ryan Holiday writes a book, I read it as soon as I can get my hands on it.”

Oct 25 2019

1hr 10mins

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+1: #930 Micro Prospectus

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Not too long ago we talked about the fact that the word prosperity literally means “to go forward with hope.”    Then, as you may recall, I challenged us to take some time to create a prospectus that inspires us to invest in the project that is our masterpiece lives such that we consistently MOVE FORWARD WITH HOPE.   Then…   I realized that this is pretty much exactly what we’re trying to do with our Coaches on a daily, micro-prospectus level via something we’re calling “Carpe Diem” journaling.    Carpe Diem.    Seize the day!!    How?   Create a micro-prospectus.    How?   Well, one way is via The Big 3 (x 2): Energy + Work + Love (x Identity + Virtues + Behaviors).   In (very) short:    Identity: Who are you at your Optimus best Energy + Work + Love-wise?    Virtues: What virtues do you embody as you express your best in each of those Identities?    Behaviors: What’s ONE thing that best version of you would do TODAY Energy + Work + Love-wise?    That’s it. #carpediem   You can do the whole thing in a minute by writing 9 words. Or, you can spend a few more minutes if you feel so inspired.   Super simple micro-prospectus.   When?   Today. Tomorrow. The day after that.    Stoke the fire of hope.   And…   Prosper!   (btw: We’ll be unpacking this whole process a LOT more in our upcoming Mastery Series. For now, here’s a little one-page journal sheet you can play with. And, here’s Michael showing you how to rock it.)

Oct 22 2019

3mins

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Optimize Interview: Everything is Figureoutable with Marie Forleo

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My wife Alexandra has been a huge fan of Marie’s for a long time. I knew she was awesome. But... As I told Alexandra: “I had no idea Marie was THAT awesome!!!” My excuse: I’ve been in hermit-mode and have done nothing but read books for 5 years (no blogs/videos/etc.) so I wasn’t able to get the full sense of Marie’s heroically brilliant and grounded and HILARIOUS power until this book came out. I’ve read and created PhilosophersNotes on well over 500 books. This is one of my ABSOLUTE (!) favorites of all time. I HIGHLY (!!!) recommend it. It’s in the same league as some of my other favorites like Deep Work Atomic Habits and The 5 Second Rule. (In fact, on my chalkboard right now, I actually have “EVERYTHING IS FIGUREOUTABLE” right above “5-4-3-2-1-GO!” -- Winning combo!) The book is PACKED (!) with Big Ideas and I’m excited to share my chat with Marie about a few of her favorites.

Oct 18 2019

1hr 10mins

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+1: #925 C.A.N.O.E-ing

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One of the core themes of our work together (in these +1s and in our Coach program, etc.) is the power of constantly (!) experimenting as we find little ways to Optimize.    All day. Every day.    Repeat.    (Again.) (And again.) (And again!)   All done with a big eudaimonically joyful smile—as if we’re playing the greatest game ever created. (Which, of course, we are.)   So…   We’ve called it a bunch of things.    In a business environment, the whole idea of kaizen is super popular. (Kaizen is Japanese for “improvement.” … Synonymous with “Optimize”?)   While Tony Robbins calls it “CANI!” (As in “Constant And Never-ending Improvement.”)   So…   I’m riffing on that basic theme during our fundies session on Sleep—reminding us all of the power of chipping away and looking for marginal gains as we have fun with the whole CANI thing.   Only, I suggested we swap out the “I” for “E” and make it “Constant And Never-ending EXPERIMENTING” (rather than “Improving”).   I then made the (weak) suggestion that perhaps we could pronounce it: CAN-EE!    To which Michael Balchan (my right-hand guy with our Coach program) playfully suggested we call it “CANOE!” (short for “Constant And Never-ending Optimizing Experimentation”) as he made some side-to-side canoeing motions.   To which I said, “PERFECT!”   C.A.N.O.E-ing!!   Constant And Never-ending Optimizing Experimentation.   That’s Today’s +1.   What’s one little experiment YOU can run Today?   Let’s grab our CANOEs and hop in the Optimizing River of Flexibility.

Oct 17 2019

3mins

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+1: #920 Borrowed Energy

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In one of our very first Notes, we took a quick look at Brendan Brazier’s The Thrive Diet.    I read the book when it came out nearly a dozen years ago. Loved it. Then Brendan and I met at an event, became friends, etc.   If you’re looking for ideas on how to be a high-performance plant-based athlete/human, I think you’ll enjoy Brenden and his work. He’s a former professional endurance athlete and the formulator (and cofounder) of the Vega nutrition brand.   Today we’re going to chat about one of my favorite Ideas from his book.   It popped into my head during the Q&A with our Coaches after our session on Sleep as we discussed having curfews on our caffeine while remembering the fact that when we routinely get less than 6 or 7 hours of sleep we DOUBLE (!) our risk for cancer.    First, here’s the wisdom from Brendan: “I consider coffee drinking an uncomplementary stress. I view it as a form of credit, similar to shopping with a credit card. You get energy now that you don’t actually have, but you pay for it later—when the ‘bill,’ or fatigue, hits. (Simply drinking more coffee to put off the inevitable is like paying off one credit card with another: It will catch up with you sooner or later.) You’ll most likely pay a high interest rate as well, needing more time to recover than if that energy had not been borrowed in the first place. This is the beginning of a vicious cycle.”   Let’s call that “Borrowed Energy.”   Now, let’s connect that to the Matthew Walker gem we keep on talking about: “Two thirds of adults throughout all developed nations fail to obtain the recommended eight hours of nightly sleep. I doubt you’re surprised by this fact, but you may be surprised by the consequences. Routinely sleeping less than six or seven hours a night demolishes your immune system, more than doubling your risk of cancer.”    So…   You know what MOST of those two-thirds of adults who aren’t getting enough sleep do to make up for the fatigue they almost certainly feel most days?   They (of course) BORROW ENERGY.   In the form of caffeine via coffee, sodas, tea, etc. And/or sugar, etc.    Now…   It would be GREAT if we actually had a running tab on all the energy we’ve borrowed. Some super simple energy budgeting App like Mint for Energy.    One glance and we can see how much more energy we borrowed Today and how high our interest rates are, etc.   Unfortunately (and this is TRULY unfortunate), we don’t.   Instead, we go on borrowing more and more and more energy. Day in and day out. Week in and week out. Month in and month out. Year in and year out. Decade in and decade out.   And then…   We don’t just continue to feel fatigue…   Instead…    We double our risk of getting cancer and make ourselves unnecessarily vulnerable to all the other chronic illnesses we don’t want.    And…   WHAM!   Our debt is due.   And we run a vey high risk of paying a VERY steep price in the form of one of those dreaded chronic diseases that are currently plaguing our modern society.   Let’s remember that the vast majority of chronic diseases could be prevented with a few simple (fundamental!) lifestyle changes.   I repeat myself (yet again): One of the biggest levers we can pull?   Get a good night of sleep.   Stop borrowing so much Energy.   Pay down your Energy debt. Start building your Energy wealth portfolio.   Today.   (How will you +1 it, my Energized friend?!)

Oct 12 2019

5mins

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+1: #910 Sweeping Our Own Porches

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Today is, of course, October 2nd, 2019.    Let’s hop in a time machine.    Destination: 150 years ago: 1869.    Cars don’t exist yet. Neither do phones. (Let alone a smartphone.)    So…    Imagine me sending this to you via telegram as we appreciate all the marvels of modern life.   150 years ago Today a great soul was born: Mohandas Gandhi.   Let’s celebrate by taking a moment to reflect on his iconic “Be the change you want to see” wisdom.   We’ll let another great soul who spent her life in India lead our reflection today.   As you may know, Mother Teresa once said: “If each of us would only sweep our own doorstep, the whole world would be clean.”   Yep.   That’s about right, eh?   What change do YOU want to see in the world?   Are you BEING it?   Awesome.   Here’s to sweeping our front porches as we do our little part in making the whole world clean.

Oct 02 2019

2mins

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+1: #905 The Origin of Disease

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In our last couple +1s, we’ve been hanging out in our guts. (Good times!)   Surprisingly, that’s where we discovered 90% (!) of our serotonin and 70-80% (!!) of our immune systems.   Crazy, eh?   Today we’re going to spend another moment on the subject.   Get this: Although modern medicine pretty much ignores the gut as its standard of care focuses on alleviating symptoms rather than Optimizing systems, the idea that our guts play a central role in our well-being isn’t a new idea.   Let’s jump into a time machine and rewind the clock about 2,400 years.    Destination: Ancient Greece.    It’s time to meet the father of medicine: Hippocrates.   You know what he said? “All disease begins in the gut.”   Dr. Gundry echoes that wisdom and adds a little bonus gem (via The Longevity Paradox) where he tells us: “As Hippocrates famously and wisely said, ‘All disease begins in the gut.’ The good news is that all disease can be stopped there as well.”   That’s Today’s +1.   What’s ONE thing you KNOW you could be doing to Optimize your nutrition?   Is TODAY a good day to make that happen?   Fantastic.   High fives.   Low fives.   Mid fives. (Right around the gut!)   Etc.   Let’s do this!!!

Sep 27 2019

1min

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