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Rank #18 in Food category

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A Taste of the Past

Updated 5 days ago

Rank #18 in Food category

Arts
Society & Culture
Food
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Linda Pelaccio, a culinary historian, takes a weekly journey through the history of food on A Taste of the Past. Tune in for interviews with authors, scholars and culinary chroniclers who discuss food culture from ancient Mesopotamia and Rome to the grazing tables and deli counters of today. Each week Linda explores the lively link between food cultures of the present and past.

Read more

Linda Pelaccio, a culinary historian, takes a weekly journey through the history of food on A Taste of the Past. Tune in for interviews with authors, scholars and culinary chroniclers who discuss food culture from ancient Mesopotamia and Rome to the grazing tables and deli counters of today. Each week Linda explores the lively link between food cultures of the present and past.

iTunes Ratings

206 Ratings
Average Ratings
124
37
14
13
18

Amazing topics related to food and history!

By brendawmc - Sep 08 2019
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I came upon A Taste of the Past by accident and have never looked back!! I learn something ( many things!!) every episode of this podcast! It’s my favorite one! From Sugar to salt to peanuts and seeds to cookbooks and women’s rights...all kinds of tidbits and history! I’m thankful that this podcasts opens my eyes to so many things about the history of food!

New episodes?

By Ellieh723 - Apr 11 2019
Read more
This hasn't updated since mid March; is the podcast finished putting out new shows?

iTunes Ratings

206 Ratings
Average Ratings
124
37
14
13
18

Amazing topics related to food and history!

By brendawmc - Sep 08 2019
Read more
I came upon A Taste of the Past by accident and have never looked back!! I learn something ( many things!!) every episode of this podcast! It’s my favorite one! From Sugar to salt to peanuts and seeds to cookbooks and women’s rights...all kinds of tidbits and history! I’m thankful that this podcasts opens my eyes to so many things about the history of food!

New episodes?

By Ellieh723 - Apr 11 2019
Read more
This hasn't updated since mid March; is the podcast finished putting out new shows?

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Cover image of A Taste of the Past

A Taste of the Past

Updated 5 days ago

Read more

Linda Pelaccio, a culinary historian, takes a weekly journey through the history of food on A Taste of the Past. Tune in for interviews with authors, scholars and culinary chroniclers who discuss food culture from ancient Mesopotamia and Rome to the grazing tables and deli counters of today. Each week Linda explores the lively link between food cultures of the present and past.

Episode 55: America’s Vanished Foods

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Linda Pelaccio explores America’s Vanished Foods on this week’s episode of A Taste of the Past with Andrew Beahrs, author of Twain’s Feast: Searching for America’s Lost Foods in the Footsteps of Samuel Clemens. Tune in to hear about some of the original “heritage” foods of America including raccoon, oysters and terrapin soup. Learn about the food history and culture that can be drawn from the writings of Mark Twain and find out why things have changed drastically since those times. This episode was sponsored by Cain Vineyard & Winery. For more information visit www.CainFive.com

Mar 24 2011

35mins

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Episode 214: 100 Years of Pyrex: How it Changed the Way America Cooks

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Look in your kitchen cabinet, there’s no doubt a Pyrex dish in there somewhere, whether it be a glass pie plate or the ubiquitous glass measuring cup with the red incremental markings.  This year marks the 100th anniversary of Pyrex, and Linda Pelaccio is celebrating on today’s episode of _ A Taste of the Past _ with guest Regan Brumagen of the Rakow Research Library at the Corning Museum of Glass.  As one of the curators of the “America’s Favorite Dish: Celebrating a Century of Pyrex” exhibit, Regan and Linda engage in a fascinating conversation from all things measuring cups to the vintage advertising to the product’s place in the emergence of home economics.  Tune in for more!

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Oct 15 2015

35mins

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Episode 102: Sake

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On this episode of A Taste of the Past, Linda Pelaccio is in the studio with Tim Sullivan, sake educator and founder of the site UrbanSake.com. Tune in to hear about how rice processing and milling determines sake quality, why sake is more similar to beer than wine, and why sake is unlikely to give you a hangover. Did the tsunami affect sake quality and production in Japan? Is the sake contaminated by nuclear material? Tim says that sake production is monitored by the Japanese government and is completely safe! Sake doesn’t necessarily need to accompany traditional Japanese food; it suits all types of cuisines and can compliment any meal. Learn more about the history of sake, and try some with your next dinner. This program has been brought to you by Hearst Ranch.



“Sake today can be very elegant. There’s a lot of nuance. That’s a modern phenomenon. That is something that has only been around for the last forty or fifty years. Sake itself has been around for 2,000 years.”

“The more you mill down [the rice], the higher the quality. All the rice we eat is brown; if you’re eating white rice, it has been milled.”

Tim Sullivan on A Taste of the Past

May 10 2012

30mins

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Episode 119: A History of Peanut Butter with Author Jon Krampner

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Everyone has heard about George Washington Carver, and his famous peanut preparations. But did you know that he did not actually invent peanut butter? This week on A Taste of the Past, Linda Pelaccio is setting the peanut butter record straight with author Jon Krampner. Jon recently wrote Creamy & Curnchy, a book all about the history and evolution of peanut butter! Learn about the most popular peanut varieties, and whether or not they can be turned into good peanut butter. Hear about the five major changes that have occurred in peanut butter production throughout the years. How do preferred flavors and textures of peanut butter change throughout different areas of the the United States? Learn about the important cultural role that peanut butter plays in the United States, and why it proved to be useful in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. This episode has been sponsored by White Oak Pastures.



“I think the [return to natural peanut butter] is part of a broader trend of Americans just wanting to eat in a more healthy and natural way, and reject some of the corporate foods that have been foisted upon them.” [24:00]

Jon Krampner on A Taste of the Past

Nov 29 2012

35mins

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Episode 113: Burmese Cuisine with Naomi Duguid

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This week on A Taste of the Past, host Linda Pelaccio is joined by Canadian food writer Noami Duguid, who has authored seminal books such as “Seductions of Rice” and “Burma: Rivers of Flavor”. Tune in and hear what it’s like being an outsider in a foreign land and how Noami navigates cultures and communities to learn about the cuisine that lives amongst them. Find out how the politically oppressed people of Burma operate in their kitchens what makes their food simultaneously accessible and unique. From fish paste to garlic, discover the layered flavors of Burma and the delicious dishes that come from them. This program was sponsored by Hearst Ranch.



“I’m always a beginner – wherever I am. I will never be an expert. All I’m trying to do is get my head in a place where I have some understand of what grows there, how people think about their food, how things are made, what’s important to them and what’s not important of them.” [3:43]

“I didn’t want to talk about the people of Burma as victims because we think of victims as less than whole.” [9:00]

“In Burmese culture, people use tea leaves in salad. They ferment them, use them fresh or dried.” [21:00]

“My problem with breakfast in Burma is there are so many things I want to eat!” [26:50]

“Food is an entry point – it’s a way of understanding how things work.” [28:30]

— Noami Duguid on A Taste of the Past

Oct 04 2012

31mins

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Episode 34: Some Spicy History with Michael Krondl

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This week on A Taste of the Past Linda talks salt, pepper, and spice: currency, commodity, and culinary aid. Author and culinary historian Michael Krondl breaks down the roles that specific spices played in their respective empires; the English and Dutch colonies that were built to trade it, Venice as a spice-stuffed world financial hub, and how many peppercorns made a nickel. Plus Krondl reveals that the cinnamon in your cupboard is an impostor. This episode was sponsored by Fairway: like no other market.

Sep 30 2010

37mins

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Episode 46: Origins of Curry

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This week’s discussion on A Taste of the Past focuses on curry, one of the most widley used – and misused – terms in the culinary lexicon. Joining Linda is Colleen Taylor Sen, a food historian and journalist specializing in the cuisine of India. Linda and Colleen trace the history of curry, from the East India Trading Company to British fast food chains. Tune in and learn what should and shouldn’t be considered curry and how curry leaves differ from curry powder. This episode was sponsored by Cain Vineyard & Winery. For more information visit www.cainfive.com

Jan 13 2011

32mins

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Episode 105: Giuliano Hazan

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This week on A Taste of the Past, Linda Pelaccio is on the phone with Giuliano Hazan, cooking instructor and author of a new book entitled Hazan Family Favorites. Giuliano comes from a tradition of fine Italian cooking. His mother, Marcella Hazan, is a famous Italian cookery writer. Tune in to hear Giuliano recount stories of frying with his grandmother, and being teased because of his Italian school lunches. Giuliano’s book includes unpretentious recipes designed to inspire home cooking. Hear about Giuliano’s favorite pasta dish, why he loves to teach, and the importance of cooking with family. Hear some of Giuliano’s heirloom recipes on this episode of A Taste of the Past. This episode has been brought to you by Whole Foods.



“My mother and father could put up with a lot of things, but not bad food…”

“I think a lot people have a misconception that fried food is always going to be greasy and heavy, but fried properly it’s really a wonderful way to cook because it seals the natural flavors of the food inside with this crispy exterior. It’s almost the purest way of enjoying something when it’s very well fried.”

“The act of cooking together creates a bond within a family.”

Giuliano Hazan on A Taste of the Past

May 31 2012

32mins

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Episode 36: Truffles

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This week on A Taste of the Past Linda delves into the luxurious world of the truffle, and speaks to Vincent Jeanseaume of Sabatino Tartufi. Vincent and Linda take a look at the many varieties of truffle available (or not-so-available), why truffle oil is only a half-accurate moniker, and the many delicious things Vincent and others can do with this versatile fungus. Linda also relates a personal experience involving a hundred dollar stinky Italian truffle. This episode was sponsored by White Oak Pastures.

Oct 21 2010

34mins

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Episode 54: Vegetarian Cooking with Deborah Madison

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This week on A Taste of the Past, Linda is joined by Deborah Madison, “The Julia Child of Vegetarian Cooking”. Linda & Deborah dispel some of the stigmas and misconceptions surrounding vegetarian diets and explore ways to overcome the idea of a “centerless plate”. Tune in to learn about the Meatless Mondays initiative and find out which cultures are best with vegetarian dishes! This episode was sponsored by The Museum of Food & Drink. Learn about the “Get the Ball Rolling” fundraiser here.

Mar 10 2011

36mins

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Episode 212: The Jemima Code: Two Centuries of African-American Cookbooks

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Women of African descent have contributed to America’s food culture for centuries, but their rich and varied involvement is still overshadowed by the demeaning stereotype of an illiterate “Aunt Jemima” who cooked mostly by natural instinct. Toni Tipton-Martin describes her years of research amassing one of the world’s largest private collections of cookbooks published by African American authors, looking for evidence of their impact on American food, families, and communities and for ways we might use that knowledge to inspire community wellness of every kind.

“This idea that there is a ‘Jemima Code,’ for me it’s this idea that actions, thoughts, behaviors, opinions, are all crafted and generated out of this trademark image that was based on a myth.” [3:45]

–Toni Tipton-Martin on A Taste of the Past

Oct 01 2015

37mins

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Episode 118: Thanksgiving’s Roots with Food Historian Sandy Oliver

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Linda Pelaccio begins today’s episode of A Taste of the Past by taking a moment to spread the word about Family-to-Family, a relief organization that allows a group of people to sponsor a family who has been affected by Hurricane Sandy. Thanksgiving has always been accompanied by charitable spirit; check out Family-to-Family, and get involved with the hurricane relief efforts. Today, Linda is speaking with food historian Sandy Oliver about the roots of Thanksgiving! Sandy is also the author of the book Saltwater Foodways, a history of Yankee cooking and New England eating traditions, and the recent Maine Home Cooking. Tune into this episode to learn about the religious considerations of Thanksgiving, and how it came to be a national holiday. What foods were most likely on the table during the first harvest feast? Sandy and Linda share some dishes that you may not recognize! Hear about the history of Thanksgiving commercialism! This program has been sponsored by Rolling Press.



“Most of us don’t recognize mincemeat for the preserve that it is. It is a way of preserving meat along with apples and other kinds of fruits. It also was convenience food.” [14:05]

Sandy Oliver on A Taste of the Past

Nov 15 2012

33mins

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Episode 128: Southern Cooking with Nathalie Dupree and Cynthia Graubart

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Master the art of Southern cooking today on A Taste of the Past! This week, Linda Pelaccio is joined in the studio by Nathalie Dupree and Cynthia Graubart, co-authors of the book Mastering the Art of Southern Cooking. Both Nathalie and Cynthia have had storied careers in the food world. How has the landscape changed for women in the kitchen? Hear Nathalie and Cynthia talk about the defining ingredients and flavors of Southern food, and the importance of eating real food. How do the foods in different regions of the South fit together into a concise cuisine? Learn more about the cooking techniques, recipe testing, and creativity that went into Nathalie and Cynthia’s book! This program has been brought to you by White Oak Pastures.



“That’s what I call ‘the new Southern cooking movement’ – when you take the fresh ingredients around you and use them in a classic way, or you use new vegetables in classic ways.” [9:40] — Nathalie Dupree on A Taste of the Past

“If you eat real food in modest portions, you’re going to be so satisfied. It’s when we restrict ourselves, go on crazy diets- that’s when we get unsatisfied; you can’t really satisfy that hunger.” [15:00]
Cynthia Graubart on A Taste of the Past

Feb 21 2013

31mins

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Episode 224: Folklore of Food

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Folklore has long explored food as a core component of life, linked to identity, aesthetics, and community and connecting individuals to larger contexts of history, culture and power. It recognizes that we gather together to eat, define class, gender, and race by food production, preparation, and consumption, celebrate holidays and religious beliefs with food, attach meaning to the most mundane of foods, and evoke memories and emotions through our food selections and presentations. Today, A Taste of the Past host Linda Pelaccio welcomes Dr. Lucy Long to the show to elaborate on her books, The Food and Folklore Reader as well as Culinary Tourism, talking how these topics play into current food studies and much more.

Jan 21 2016

38mins

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Episode 131: Clodagh McKenna

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Getting excited about St. Patrick’s Day? Tune in to A Taste of the Past this week as Linda Pelaccio hosts Irish chef, TV personality, cookbook author and director of a new cookery school, Clodagh McKenna. Coming all the way from Dublin, Clodagh shares stories of growing up in Ireland and how she uses Guinness for a slow roast and pin-head oats in her soda bread. Listen in as she discusses the evolution of Irish cuisine since the 1970’s and the growing trend towards local sourcing and farmers markets. Clodagh has seen it all! She has her hands in everything, so tune in and hear about her passion for Irish farmers markets, traditional Irish cuisine, and her recent collaboration with Chef Chris Bradley at Untitled restaurant in the Whitney Museum! This program was sponsored by White Oak Pastures.



“And now in West Cork, this small area has more arts and producers than anywhere in Ireland.” [17:00]

“[The cookbook] is kind of selfish really, its my companion in the kitchen.” [28:00]

–Clodagh McKenna, Chef and Owner of Clodagh’s Kitchen on A Taste of the Past

Mar 14 2013

33mins

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Episode 140: Coffee History

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Mark Pendergrast comes into the studio this week on A Taste of the Past to talk about the history of coffee! Mark Pendergast is an American independent scholar, and author of six books, with his most recent titled, “Uncommon Grounds: The History of Coffee and How It Transformed Our World”. Telling the story of coffee from its discovery on a hill in ancient Abyssinia to the advent of Starbucks, Mr. Pendergrast is an expert when it comes to the history, craft, and production of coffee. Learn how coffee was able to sober up Europe, how coffee first became a traded product through the growth of the railroad industry, and the truth behind the health benefits of coffee. Think you know a lot about coffee? Listen to this program and we’re sure that you’ll expand your knowledge even further. This program has been sponsored by Rt. 11 Potato Chips.



“It’s inevitable that we’re going to continue having a boom in coffee.” [18:05]

“One of the things that’s revolutionized coffee is the one way valve.” [25:03]

“A great way to make coffee: 2 teaspoons of ground coffee and 6 ounces of boiled water.” [31:05]

Mark Pendergrast on A Taste of the Past

Jun 20 2013

40mins

Play

Episode 216: Frederick Douglass Opie on Zora Neale Hurston

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Zora Neale Hurston is one of the most notable authors of the Harlem Renaissance. Her extensive ethnographic research on African American foodways throughout the state of Florida remains a critical historic resource to this day. Her work provides insight into meals such as pickled pig’s feet and their rise in the southern African American community as a staple, as well as many home remedies like parched rice and bay leaves for an upset stomach and recipes to cure “loss of mind.” From Floridian fried turtle to chicken pancakes, author Frederick Douglass Opie explores the lingering impact of Hurston’s work and Florida food while incorporating recipes that remain essential today.

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Oct 29 2015

33mins

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Episode 206: Roman Food Culture

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Elizabeth Minchilli has been eating her way through Rome since she was 12 years old. “Eating Rome,” is her homage to the city that feeds her, literally and figuratively. This week on A Taste of the Past, host Linda Pelaccio is getting Elizabeth’s personal story which is a quirky and deliciously entertaining look at some of the city’s monuments to food culture. Strolling through her favorite open air markets along with details of amazing coffee, pizza, artichokes and grappa are just the starting points for mouth-watering stories about this ancient city. If you are planning your first trip to Rome or if you’ve been a dozen times, tune in as Linda spends this episode traveling through the region with Elizabeth as the perfect travel guide. This program was brought to you by Bonnie Plants.





“The thinking is that the last thing in the world you would want after a big lunch [in Rome] is a big cup of warm milk, which is basically what cappuccino is… so they’ll give it to you but they’ll be very disapproving.” [8:22]

“These [farmer’s] markets which are only open on Saturdays and Sundays are really crowded. I think that shows a rebirth of this interest in buying quality food from the source.” [16:35]

Elizabeth Minchilli on A Taste of the Past

May 21 2015

35mins

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Episode 22: Ice Cream with Jon Snyder & Jeri Quinzio

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This week on A Taste of the Past Linda spoke with two masters of frozen delights. Jon Snyder of Il Laboratorio del Gelato and Jeri Quinzio, author of “Of Sugar and Snow” stopped by with some delicious insight into the history and future of ice cream.

May 20 2010

33mins

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Episode 203: The Middle Eastern Roots of Spices and the Early Globalization of Food

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On this week’s episode of A Taste of the Past, host Linda Pelaccio takes listeners on a vivid and far-ranging journey across time and space on the ancient spice trades with Dr. Gary Nabhan. Talking about his new book, “Cumin, Camels, and Caravans, A Spice Odyssey,” Gary draws on his own family’s history as spice traders, as well as travel narratives, historical accounts, and his expertise as an ethnobotanist, he describes the critical roles that Semitic peoples and desert floras had in setting the stage for globalized spice trade. Gary relays to Linda his travels along four prominent trade routes—the Silk Road, the Frankincense Trail, the Spice Route, and the Camino Real (for chiles and chocolate)—and follows the caravans of itinerant spice merchants from the frankincense-gathering grounds and ancient harbors of the Arabian Peninsula to the port of Zayton on the China Sea to Santa Fe in the southwest United States. His stories, recipes, and linguistic analyses of cultural diffusion routes reveal the extent to which aromatics such as cumin, cinnamon, saffron, and peppers became adopted worldwide as signature ingredients of diverse cuisines. With the idea that spices are viewed as political, religious, and cultural tools, Gary and Linda also touch upon how a more virtuous multicultural globalized society may be achieved in the future. Tune in to this fascinating episode! This program was brought to you by Whole Foods Market.







Photo via US Library of Congress

“I think we have to learn of the costs embedded in our own history to get right the balance between local and global.”

Dr. Gary Nabhan on A Taste of the Past

Apr 23 2015

30mins

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Episode 341: Serious Eats' Ed Levine

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LIVE FROM INDUSTRY CITY: Linda interviews Ed Levine, food writer, author, and founder of one of the top food and cooking websites, SeriousEats.com. From a serious pizza taster to a serious website founder, Ed Levine had one mantra: “YOU ARE ONE OF THOSE people who refuse to lose who end up finding success.” It is the mindset that Levine carried with him throughout the ups and downs of his career. This tumultuous journey is also the primary focus of his latest book Serious Eater: A Food Lover’s Perilous Quest for Pizza and Redemption. 

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Dec 05 2019

47mins

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Episode 340: Joy of Cooking - Redux

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It’s been nearly ninety years since Irma S. Rombauer self-published the first edition of Joy of Cooking in 1931. It quickly rose in popularity and soon became the “kitchen bible,” shaping the recipes and techniques of home cooks. Irma’s daughter, Marion Rombauer Becker, revised and wrote the 6th edition in 1975, now considered a classic. Today there is a new, modern edition which reclaims many of the lost recipes over the years and adds a few new ones. John Becker, Marion's grandson and great-grandson of Irma , and his wife Megan Scott spent nine years revising and updating the recipes and information for the newest Joy of Cooking. They share their stories of that effort with Linda on this episode.

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Nov 14 2019

50mins

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Episode 339: The Food of Sichuan

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Sichuan food has long been known for its heat and spice, but the fragrant flavors and sophistication that it holds throughout China was little known abroad. The award-winning food writer Fuchsia Dunlop has done much to introduce the finer flavors of Sichuan cuisine. She has revised her 2001 book, Land of Plenty, to create a more encompassing book of the culture and recipes of Sichuan Food.

Join Heritage Radio Network on Monday, November 11th, for a raucous feast to toast a decade of food radio. Our tenth anniversary bacchanal is a rare gathering of your favorite chefs, mixologists, storytellers, thought leaders, and culinary masterminds. We’ll salute the inductees of the newly minted HRN Hall of Fame, who embody our mission to further equity, sustainability, and deliciousness. Explore the beautiful Palm House and Yellow Magnolia Café, taste and imbibe to your heart’s content, and bid on once-in-a-lifetime experiences and tasty gifts for any budget at our silent auction. Tickets available now at heritageradionetwork.org/gala.

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Nov 07 2019

41mins

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Episode 338: American Cuisine and How It Got This Way

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What is American cuisine? Is there an American cuisine? It’s probably one of the most debated questions in food circles, certainly by food writers. Historian Paul Freedman, author of the recent best-selling book, Ten Restaurants that Changed America, explores the question in his newest book, AMERICAN CUISINE, and How It Got This Way.

Join Heritage Radio Network on Monday, November 11th, for a raucous feast to toast a decade of food radio. Our tenth anniversary bacchanal is a rare gathering of your favorite chefs, mixologists, storytellers, thought leaders, and culinary masterminds. We’ll salute the inductees of the newly minted HRN Hall of Fame, who embody our mission to further equity, sustainability, and deliciousness. Explore the beautiful Palm House and Yellow Magnolia Café, taste and imbibe to your heart’s content, and bid on once-in-a-lifetime experiences and tasty gifts for any budget at our silent auction. Tickets available now at heritageradionetwork.org/gala.

A Taste of the Past is powered by Simplecast.

Oct 31 2019

45mins

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Episode 337: The History and Art of Tailgating

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What do football games, concerts, NASCAR, and similar outdoor gatherings have in common? Tailgate parties, or "tailgating" as it's commonly called. It's an American cultural phenomenon, and my guest today, Lynne Weems Ryan, whose moniker is Tailgage Buzz, is well-versed in the art and history of these social gatherings.

Join Heritage Radio Network on Monday, November 11th, for a raucous feast to toast a decade of food radio. Our tenth anniversary bacchanal is a rare gathering of your favorite chefs, mixologists, storytellers, thought leaders, and culinary masterminds. We’ll salute the inductees of the newly minted HRN Hall of Fame, who embody our mission to further equity, sustainability, and deliciousness. Explore the beautiful Palm House and Yellow Magnolia Café, taste and imbibe to your heart’s content, and bid on once-in-a-lifetime experiences and tasty gifts for any budget at our silent auction. Tickets available now at heritageradionetwork.org/gala.

A Taste of the Past is powered by Simplecast.

Oct 24 2019

46mins

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Episode 336: Seeking the South

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“There’s no genre of American cuisine as storied as Southern,” according to Rob Newton, Southern born chef/restaurateur, and now cookbook author. In his book, Seeking the South: Finding Inspired Regional Cuisines, Rob describes how the clash of cultures and ever-shifting mix of people who have moved through Southern regions have influenced the cuisine, making it culturally rich with distinct regional differences.

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Oct 03 2019

47mins

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Episode 335: Dining at Downton Abbey

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Fans of the TV series "Downton Abbey" are excitedly awaiting the premiere of the movie on Friday of this week. And coinciding with the movie's release is the publication of "The Official Downtown Abbey Cookbook," by Annie Gray, one of Britain's leading food historians who joins Linda on today's episode. Dr. Gray researched recipes from historical sources for the meals seen on the show and includes notes on the ingredients and customs of the time. She gives a warm and fascinating insight into the background of the dishes that were popular between 1912 and 1926, when Downton Abbey is set – a period of tremendous change and conflict, as well as culinary development, which makes the book a truly useful work of culinary history.

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Sep 19 2019

50mins

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Episode 334: Grave Case of the Gravenstein: Saving an Heirloom Apple

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In 2005, Slow Food USA declared the 17th century Gravenstein apple a heritage food. But despite the efforts of several organizations to preserve this historically important apple, it is now listed on the Slow Food’s Ark of Taste as an endangered American food. Why has such a flavorful fruit fallen out of favor? The attributing factors are several and, fortunately,so are it's supporters. Joining me to discuss the Gravenstein apple's perilous future are Chris Mittelstaedt, a produce expert and Founder & CEO of The FruitGuys.com based in San Francisco, and Rebecca North, Director of Quality and Supply Chain at The FruitGuys.

It's HRN's annual summer fund drive, this is when we turn to our listeners and ask that you make a donation to help ensure a bright future for food radio. Help us keep broadcasting the most thought provoking, entertaining, and educational conversations happening in the world of food and beverage. Become a member today! To celebrate our 10th anniversary, we have brand new member gifts available. So snag your favorite new pizza - themed tee shirt or enamel pin today and show the world how much you love HRN, just go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate

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Aug 01 2019

41mins

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Episode 333: PICKLES!

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Pickling is an ancient method of preserving foods, and even though the preservation need is no longer the major importance in today’s gastronomic world, pickled foods are valued more as a food that excites and delivers those desired, assertive flavors. Fermentationist Jori Jayne Emde of Lady Jaynes Alchemy talk about the process and Zach Meyer from Claussen (Kraft-Heinz,) one of America's top choice, commercially produced pickles shares their history.

It's HRN's annual summer fund drive, this is when we turn to our listeners and ask that you make a donation to help ensure a bright future for food radio. Help us keep broadcasting the most thought provoking, entertaining, and educational conversations happening in the world of food and beverage. Become a member today! To celebrate our 10th anniversary, we have brand new member gifts available. So snag your favorite new pizza - themed tee shirt or enamel pin today and show the world how much you love HRN, just go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate.

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Jul 18 2019

43mins

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Episode 332: Molly O'Neill

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Today, we are rerunning Episode #52 of A Taste of the Past, in which we spoke with Molly O'Neill. Molly passed away this week, and she will be sorely missed.

It's HRN's annual summer fund drive, this is when we turn to our listeners and ask that you make a donation to help ensure a bright future for food radio. Help us keep broadcasting the most thought provoking, entertaining, and educational conversations happening in the world of food and beverage. Become a member today! To celebrate our 10th anniversary, we have brand new member gifts available. So snag your favorite new pizza - themed tee shirt or enamel pin today and show the world how much you love HRN, just go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate.

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Jun 20 2019

31mins

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Episode 331: Salt-Works: Reviving a Centuries Old Tradition in the Appalachian Mountains

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William Dickinson first drilled for brine in 1817, in western Virginia, using a hollowed-out tree trunk for piping, The town soon became the "salt capial of the east." Today, two 7th generation descendants of Dickinson, siblings Nancy Bruns and Lewis Payne, have reinvented this storied tradition, transforming the process by using natural and environmentally friendly concepts to produce small-batch finishing salt. On the very same family farm where William Dickinson lived and made salt, Nancy and Lewis have recaptured salt from this pristine 400 million year old ancient sea below the Appalachian Mountains. Nancy joins Linda to tell the story.

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Jun 13 2019

47mins

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Episode 330: Women's Work: History of Community Cookbooks

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Community cookbooks—you know, those spiral bound collections with each contributor credited--began as a way for women to come together and share recipes and to support a common cause be it a local church, school, club, or other fundraising goal. The concept became so popular and spread rapidly throughout the nation that more than 3,000 charity cookbooks were published between 1864 and 1922, according to Feeding America, an historic cookbook project of Michigan State University. Antiquarian bookseller, collector and food historian Don Lindgren shares his insights into this movement from charitable funding to the breaking of gender limits.

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May 30 2019

52mins

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Episode 329: Eat With Your Eyes: "Moritsuké," Japanese Arrangement of Food on the Plate

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Have you ever marveled at the delicately complex beauty of a plate of Japanese food? A dish is considered well-harmonized in Japanese when it is peaceful to look at. This arrangement of food on the plates in Japan or at Japanese restaurants is largely dictated by the rules of moritsuké, or serving arrangement. These are a set of styles that draw on the ideas of balance and contrast established centuries ago. Elizabeth Andoh, an authority on Japanese food and culture, TasteofCulture.com, explains the art and philosopy behind the saying, "Japanese eat with their eyes."

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May 23 2019

56mins

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Episode 328: Evolution of the American Kitchen, From Workplace to Dreamscape,1940s-70s

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The prosperity of the 1950's kicked off the revolution in technology and design that transformed the American kitchen from scullery to the central great room of the modern home. Modern pastel colored appliances and kitchen products made by companies whose names became household synonyms for convenience were representative of the era. Writer and design curator Sarah Archer has documented this movement in her new book, The Midcentury Kitchen, and joins Linda to talk about it.

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May 16 2019

44mins

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Episode 327: Pierre Thiam on FONIO: History and Future of the African Supergrain

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New York City-based Senegalese chef Pierre Thiam has heightened the profile of West African cuisine in the United States with his restaurants and award-winning cookbooks Yolélé and Senegal. His new mission is to popularize the ancient supergrain FONIO in the U.S. and help farmers across the drought-prone Sahel region.

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May 09 2019

44mins

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Episode 326: Lost and Disappearing Dishes of the Italian South

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The cuisine of the Italian south has been called the soul of Italian cuisine and bedrock in the history of Italian cooking. In her new book, Food of the Italian South, food journalist and historian Katie Parla explores the cuisine, region by region, and discovers that many of the dishes are disappearing or are lost and remain as vague memories by later generations. Katie shares her insights into the history and culture of the southern regions that shaped the country’s soulful cuisine.

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Photo courtesy of Ed Anderson.

Apr 18 2019

46mins

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Episode 325: Pintxos and Food of the Basque Country

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The Basque region of Spain is a food lover's mecca. From the endless variety of pintxos--the small bites offered at hundreds of bars--to rustic ciderhouse dinners; and from over 20 Michelin-starred restaurants to private gastronomic clubs, there is clearly a strong culture of food and dining. San Sebastián, once a humble fishing village, is at the center of all this gastronomy. San Sebastian native and culinary tour guide Lourdes Erquicia shares the history of the region and its food traditions.

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Apr 11 2019

44mins

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Episode 324: The Ancient Secret of Cetara: Colatura di Alici

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For centuries, in the small town of Cetara on the Amalfi Coast of Italy, anchovies have been gathered and fermented into the piquant sauce "colatura di alici," a local specialty. Until the 1990s, colatura di alici had never been bottled or sold. People clamored for the artisanal product and asked for more. Now the town is embroiled in a "be careful what you wish for" scenario. Culinary history scholar Claire Alsup spent several months in Cetara examining the history and process, and was thrust into the middle of the town's debate.

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Mar 21 2019

52mins

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Episod 323: Irish Classics

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It's been 30 years since Irish cooking personality Darina Allen started SIMPLY DELICIOUS, her original television program and cookbook series. Today she looks back over that period of time and talks about the tried and true Irish dishes that she has gathered for her newest book, Simply Delicious: The Classic Collection. She reflects on how the cuisine has evolved over the years and descibes the traditional Irish recipes that have endured.

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Mar 14 2019

46mins

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Episode 322: Bartolomeo Scappi: History Reimagined

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Author Crystal King’s newest historical novel, “The Chef’s Secret,” is a fictional story based on a true character, Bartolomeo Scappi, who served as the Vatican chef during the 16th century Italian Renaissance. From Scappi’s original cookbooks and her extensive research on the popes and cardinals for whom he worked, King recreates and fabricates the missing pieces of the first ""celebrity chef's"" life.
As one reviewer wrote: It’s not a meant as a scholarly novel, but merits recognition for historical details on the Vatican and its occupants, and also architectural details of Roman estates… and, of course, descriptions of Scappi’s recipes and dishes.

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Mar 07 2019

46mins

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