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Education

War Studies

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Education
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The School of Security Studies harnesses the depth and breadth of expertise across War Studies and Defence Studies to produce world-leading research and teaching on issues of global security that develops new empirical knowledge, employs innovative theory, and addresses vital policy issues. The podcasts highlight the School's research and teaching activities as well as cover events the department organises for its students and the public.DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in these podcasts are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

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The School of Security Studies harnesses the depth and breadth of expertise across War Studies and Defence Studies to produce world-leading research and teaching on issues of global security that develops new empirical knowledge, employs innovative theory, and addresses vital policy issues. The podcasts highlight the School's research and teaching activities as well as cover events the department organises for its students and the public.DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in these podcasts are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

iTunes Ratings

32 Ratings
Average Ratings
20
4
3
2
3

Bring back the Q&As at the end of lectures

By Max G............ - Jan 29 2019
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Fantastic podcast, but much of the learning comes from the Q&As they no longer post.

Unusable audio quality

By Yahoo-longing - Jan 17 2019
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The content is valuable and interesting... when I can hear it. I’ve tried this podcast a number of times but the audio quality seems to be getting worse. I hope they turn it around.

iTunes Ratings

32 Ratings
Average Ratings
20
4
3
2
3

Bring back the Q&As at the end of lectures

By Max G............ - Jan 29 2019
Read more
Fantastic podcast, but much of the learning comes from the Q&As they no longer post.

Unusable audio quality

By Yahoo-longing - Jan 17 2019
Read more
The content is valuable and interesting... when I can hear it. I’ve tried this podcast a number of times but the audio quality seems to be getting worse. I hope they turn it around.

Listen to:

Cover image of War Studies

War Studies

Updated 4 days ago

Read more

The School of Security Studies harnesses the depth and breadth of expertise across War Studies and Defence Studies to produce world-leading research and teaching on issues of global security that develops new empirical knowledge, employs innovative theory, and addresses vital policy issues. The podcasts highlight the School's research and teaching activities as well as cover events the department organises for its students and the public.DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in these podcasts are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

Event: Passchendaele - A New History

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Event recording from 04/05/2017

PASSCHENDAELE - A NEW HISTORY

Speaker: Dr Nick Lloyd
Chair: Professor Bill Philpott
Hosted by the Sir Michael Howard Centre
The Sir Michael Howard Centre: smhc@kcl.ac.uk

Between July and November 1917, in a small corner of Belgium, more than 500,000 men were killed or maimed, gassed or drowned - and many of the bodies were never found. The Ypres offensive represents the modern impression of the First World War: splintered trees, water-filled craters, muddy shell-holes.

The climax was one of the worst battles of both world wars: Passchendaele. The village fell eventually, only for the whole offensive to be called off. But, as Nick Lloyd shows, notably through previously unexamined German documents, it put the Allies nearer to a major turning point in the war than we have ever imagined.

Dr Nick Lloyd FRHistS is Reader in Military & Imperial History at King's College London, based at the Joint Services Command & Staff College in Shrivenham, Wiltshire. He is the author of three books: Loos 1915 (2006); The Amritsar Massacre: The Untold Story of One Fateful Day (2011); and Hundred Days: The End of the Great War (2013). He lives with his family in Cheltenham.

May 17 2017

37mins

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Podcast: Risk and Terror

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In this week’s episode, we explore how the public should understand and respond to risk. Dr Brooke Rogers explains how risk is understood from a practitioners point of view and how the public’s understanding may differ. In addition, Dr Rogers elaborates on the rationale behind public transport campaigns, such as ‘Run! Hide! Tell!’ and ‘See it! Say it! Sorted.’, and how these campaigns contribute to protecting public spaces.

Dr Brooke Rogers is a Reader in Risk and Terror in the Department of War Studies at King’s College London and co-directer of the MA programme in Terrorism, Security and Society. She is a social psychologist interested in risk and crisis communication, perceptions of risk, and health outcomes in response to extreme event. The majority of her projects investigate public and practitioner responses to chemical, biological, radiological or nuclear (CBRN) terrorist incidents (i.e. Home Office, PIRATE, CIE Toolkit, PRACTICE and Deloitte).

UPCOMING EVENTS AT KING’S COLLEGE LONDON

THE WAR IS IN THE MOUNTAINS

Judith Matloff teaches conflict reporting at the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism and has been writing about international affairs for 30 years. In her lecture, she explores why, despite being home to only ten percent of the world’s population, mountains are host to a strikingly disproportionate share of its conflicts.

Location: Pyramid Room ( K4U.04) 4th floor Strand Campus
When: 27/04/2017 (18:00-19:30)
Registration URL: http://bit.ly/2nfdqtf http://www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/warstudies/events/eventsrecords/The-War-is-in-the-Mountains.aspx

PASSCHENDAELE - A NEW HISTORY

Between July and November 1917, in a small corner of Belgium, more than 500,000 men were killed or maimed, gassed or drowned - and many of the bodies were never found. The Ypres offensive represents the modern impression of the First World War: splintered trees, water-filled craters and muddy shell-holes.
The climax was one of the worst battles of both world wars: Passchendaele. The village fell eventually, only for the whole offensive to be called off. But, as Nick Lloyd shows, notably through previously unexamined German documents, it put the Allies nearer to a major turning point in the war than we have ever imagined.

Location: War Studies Meeting Room (K6.07)
When: 04/05/2017 (17:30-19:00)
Registration URL: http://bit.ly/2nDPjI1 http://www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/warstudies/events/eventsrecords/Passchendaele-A-New-History-Book-Launch.aspx
CHOCOLATE OF PEACE

Join us for a screening and discussion of 'Chocolate of Peace (Cacao Defying Violence)' with producer and co-director, Gwen Burnye-at. Chocolate of Peace depicts the Colombian Peace Community of San José de Apartadó’s experiences of resistance, via a journey through their processes of organic chocolate production.

Location: Anatomy Lecture Theatre (K.6.29) Strand Campus
When: 04/05/2017 (18:30-20:00)
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/warstudies/events/eventsrecords/Chocolate-of-Peace.aspx
This podcast was produced by Ivan Seifert.

Apr 20 2017

20mins

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Individualisation of War / Writing About Violence

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Interview with Professor Jennifer Welsh who is chair of International Relations at the European University Institute and Senior Research fellow at Somerville College at the University of Oxford. She was previously a professor of international relations at the university of oxford and co-director of oxford institute for ethics, law and armed conflict. Professor Welsh is an author, co author and editor of several books and articles on international relations in particular on the notion of the evolution of the the responsibility to protect in international society.

Interview with Roger Mac Ginty who is a Professor of Peace and Conflict Studies at the University of Manchester. The interview discuses the problem of writing dispassionately about violence, calling it conflict instead, treating conflict studies as a science and how this effects the policy making sphere.

Professor Jennifer Welsh Annual War Studies Lecture ‘The Individualisation of War’: https://soundcloud.com/warstudies/war-studies-annual-lecture-professor-welsh-on-the-individualisation-of-war

Professor Roger Mac Ginty ‘How Should We Write About Violence’: https://soundcloud.com/warstudies/how-should-we-write-about-violence

May 14 2016

32mins

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2013/14 podcasts: Hobbs on Nuclear security education / Urban on UK & media

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Dr Christopher Hobbs, Deputy Director for Knowledge Transfer at the department's Centre for Science and Security Studies talks about his work on nuclear security education.
BBC Newsnight's diplomatic and defence editor Mark Urban gave this year's War Studies lecture. We have a clip here in which he discusses his experience of covering the Iraq war. His lecture on War and the British media is available in full on our YouTube Channel.
MA students Luciana Tellez and Hillary Briffa talk about the 2014 Conflict, Security and Development Conference on 'Organised Crime in Conflict Zones'.
We also have details of next week's events.
Presented by Jayne Peake
DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

Jan 31 2014

19mins

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Podcast: The Informational Dimension of Hybrid Warfare

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In this episode, we're bringing you an exclusive interview with Dr Neville Bolt, director of the King's Centre for Strategic Communications.

Dr Bolt discusses the informational dimension of hybrid warfare. Many scholars argue that the absence of war does not necessarily equate to peace. Therefore, they call this lucid state between war and peace ‘hybrid warfare’. But how useful is this term ‘hybrid warfare’ and how are Western and Eastern perspectives different when it comes to defining and interpreting this term?

For more information about the King’s Centre for Strategic Communications (KCSC), visit http://kingscsc.co.uk. Interested in pursuing an MA in Strategic Communications? Visit bit.ly/2CYzxP7 to learn more about this programme.

In January 2017, the King’s Centre for Strategic Communications (KCSC) hosted an international conference to discuss the informational dimension of hybrid warfare. Panelists from the International Centre for Counter Terrorism (ICCT, The Hague), the Moscow State Institute of International Relations (MGIMO), and the KCSC, exchanged their academic perspectives on this heated topic.

You can listen to the entire recording of this conference here: https://soundcloud.com/warstudies/sets/kcsc-conference

For more information about The Department of War Studies and upcoming events, visit www.kcl.ac.uk/warstudies/events.

Jan 28 2017

15mins

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Podcast: Cyber Conflict with Brandon Valeriano and Tim Stevens

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Description

Cyber operations are becoming increasingly important in contemporary statecraft, as they provide new means through which states may threaten or act against one another. The cases of Estonia, Saudi Aradia, Iran, and the 2016 US Presidential elections demonstrate that cyber operations can be used to compromise critical infrastructure, damage economies, undermine democracy, and can even amount to formal state conflict. However, according to Dr. Brandon Valeriano, "cyberconflict", defined as the use of computational means for malicious or destructive purposes in order to influence diplomatic or military interactions, has not necessarily opened a door to new conflicts in the international system. His research also provides that cyberconflict is neither as frequent or damaging as other forms of conflict.

How does cyberconflict fit into the continuation of international rivalries and conflicts today?

In this edition of the War Studies Podcast, we are going to dive into the domain of Cyberconflict with Dr. Brandon Valeriano, the Donald Ben Chair of Armed Politics at the Marine Corps University, and Dr. Tim Stevens, Lecturer in Global Security in the Dept. of War Studies and Convenor of the Cyber Security Research Group.

If you are interested in learning more about this topic, check out our recording of Dr. Brandon Valeriano's lecture, "Cyber Strategy: The Evolution of Cyber Power and Coercion."

May 11 2018

29mins

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Event: The Clash of The New World Orders

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Event recording from 4/12/2017; introductory remarks by Dr Natasha Kuhrt.

Professor Sakwa explores how the tension between Russia and the Atlantic community mirrored a fundamental realignment of the international system from the late 1980s onwards. He provides a new analysis of the end of the Cold War and the subsequent failure to create a comprehensive and inclusive peace order in Europe. The end of the Cold War did not create a sustainable peace system. Instead, for a quarter of a century a 'cold peace' reflected the tension between cooperative and competitive behaviour. None of the fundamental problems of European security were resolved, and tensions accumulated.

Speaker biography:

Richard Sakwa is Professor of Russian and European Politics at the University of Kent. Prof. Sakwa is an Associate Fellow of the Russia and Eurasia Programme at the Royal Institute of International Affairs, Chatham House, Honorary Senior Research Fellow at the Centre for Russian, European and Eurasian Studies (CREES) at the University of Birmingham and since September 2002 a member of Academy of Learned Societies for the Social Sciences. His latest book, 'Russia Against the Rest: The Post-Cold War Crisis of World Order' is published October 2017 with Cambridge University Press.

This event was a Russian and Eurasian Security Seminar in association with the King's Russia Institute.

Dec 15 2017

44mins

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Ebola Crisis

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Dr Kieran Mitton is Lecturer in International Relations in the Department. He has conducted extensive fieldwork in Sierra Leone for a study of reintegration in the past. Kieran is especially interested in violence characterised as ‘irrational’ and the role played by the emotions of disgust and shame. He has many contacts in West Africa and he is of course following the ebola crisis closely. He talks about the reasons for the current crisis, the most important problems and also the long-term repercussions.

Jayne Peake talks to MA student Charlie de Rivaz about next week's events.

Presented by Dr Peter Busch

DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

Oct 31 2014

13mins

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Podcast: Military Virtues and Truth Tellers

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Date of Publication: 01/06/2019

Description:

In this week’s podcast, we are going to learn about a fascinating new book on Military Virtues and how military ethics training can improve decision making in the field. Then, we will change tracks to the domain of art and conflict to explore how art can add to analytical research methodologies used in international relations (IR) with the members of the Truth Tellers Pilot study, which seeks to examine the unspeakable aspects of the response to the 2017 Manchester Arena Attack through newly develop art-IR methodologies.

Interviewees:

Military Virtues
https://www.howgatepublishing.com/product-page/militaryvirtues

Professor David Whetham, Professor of Ethics and the Military Profession at the Defence Studies Department and Co-editor of Military Virtues. Learn more about Prof Whetham's work here: https://www.kcl.ac.uk/people/whetham-dr-david

Truth Tellers Project
https://www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/warstudies/research/groups/arts/truthtellers/index

Tom de Freston, artist and writer based in Oxford and member of the Truth Tellers Project.

Mariah Whelan is a poet and academic based in The Centre for New Writing at The University of Manchester.

Dr Pablo de Orellana, Lecturer in International Relations at the Department of War Studies.

Dr Christiana Spens, Lecturer and Writer in the School of International Relations at the University of St. Andrews.

Jun 01 2019

31mins

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Podcast: ‘IS propaganda music’ — third episode of 'EXPERTS' podcast series.

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In the second episode of our new podcast series called ‘experts’, we investigate how so-called ‘Islamic State’ uses music as propaganda. Our expert Charlie Winter is Senior Research Fellow at the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation. Like all podcasts in this series, this episode is produced by Department of War Studies students who took the module ‘New Wars, New Media, New Journalism’. This module is convened by Dr Peter Busch who is also presenting this episode. The interview with Charlie was recorded in March 2019.

Nov 02 2019

21mins

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2013/14 podcasts: Preparing for CBRN Terrorism

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Dr Kristian Krieger, Research Associate in the Department, is one of a team of researchers that is headed by Dr Brooke Rogers. They work on EU funded project PRACTICE. Kristian talks about the early results of an exercise they did in Birmingham a few week's ago. You can also watch this interview (plus photos of the exercise) on the War Studies YouTube channel: http://youtu.be/G-2ObG739h0
Jayne Peake provides details of next week's events.
Presented by Dr Peter Busch
DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

Jan 17 2014

11mins

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Podcast: 'The Limits of Open Source Intelligence' - second episode of 'EXPERTS' podcast series.

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In the second episode of our new podcast series called ‘experts’, we investigate new media technology affect open source intelligence gathering and we ask what the (ethical) limitations should be. Our expert on this is Dr Huw Dylan who is a senior lecturer in the Department of War Studies. Like all podcasts in this series, this episode is produced by Department of War Studies students who took the module ‘New Wars, New Media, New Journalism’. This module is convened by Dr Peter Busch who is also presenting this episode. The interview with Dr Dylan was recorded in March 2019.

Oct 25 2019

19mins

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Event: The Parachute Regiment and the Falklands War(Sir Michael Howard Centre Lecture 2018)

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Date of Recording: 03/12/2018

Description: The Parachute Regiment played a prominent role in the 1982 Falklands conflict. They fought iconic battles at Goose Green, Mount Longdon and Wireless Ridge, and won both the war’s Victoria Crosses. Combat in the Falklands transformed the Paras’ reputation in the public mind, and moved them away from the legacies of their involvement in Northern Ireland. This lecture examines this elite unit of the British Army before, during and after the Falklands war; and in so doing, offers a window into Britain’s changing society in the 1970s and the 1980s. Who were the men who chose to join the ranks of a Regiment like the Paras in the 1970s? How did they experience combat in the Falklands? And what did it mean, for them, their families, and for Britain, after they returned home?

Bio:

Helen Parr teaches at Keele University. She has previously written on Britain’s relations with Europe. This lecture marks the publication of her book, Our Boys: The Story of a Paratrooper (Allen Lane, 2018).

Dec 06 2018

51mins

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Podcast: Prof Sir Lawrence Freedman on "The Future of War: A History"

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Questions about the future of war are a regular feature of political debate, strategic analysis, and popular fiction. Where should we look for new dangers? What cunning plans might an aggressor have in mind? What are the best forms of defence? How might peace be preserved or conflict resolved?

Professor Sir Lawrence Freedman is Emeritus Professor of War Studies at King's College London. He addresses these questions in his new book "The Future of War: A History".

In this podcast, we are bringing you an exclusive interview with Professor Freedman talking about why studying wars and predicting future wars is so difficult.
UPCOMING EVENTS AT KING'S COLLEGE LONDON:

SOLDIERS IN REVOLT: ARMY MUTINIES IN AFRICA
Dr Maggie Dwyer (Edinburgh) discusses her original research and new book 'Soldiers in Revolt' on the understudied phenomenon of military mutinies in Africa.

16th October 2017 (12:30-14:00)
Franklin Wilkins Building 1.10
Registration URL: http://bit.ly/2f3zGmV
RESISTANCE TO THE IRAN NUCLEAR DEAL: RUSSIAN, CHINESE, AND EUROPEAN POWER CLASHES WITH A NEW US ADMINISTRATION
Dr Moritz Pieper provides an overview of the role of Russia and China in the negotiations leading up to the 2015 Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action. He then assesses the survivability of the Iran deal in light of current shifts in US foreign policy.

16th October 2017 (18:15-19:30)
Bush House Lecture Theatre
Registration URL: http://bit.ly/2xncjOT
This podcast was produced by Ivan Seifert.

Oct 13 2017

37mins

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Podcast: Qatar and the weaponisation of narratives

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In 2017 Qatar was subjected to a blockade by its neighbours, led by Saudi Arabia, which severely restricted its trading and transport links. Two years on the diplomatic crisis has not been resolved.

In this podcast, Dr Andreas Krieg of the Defence Studies Department at King's College London discusses the blockade, in particular the ways that narratives were weaponised by Qatar's rivals to justify and build support for their actions both domestically and overseas. Qatar's reaction to this crisis is also discussed.

May 12 2019

26mins

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Event: European Navies and the Conduct of War

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Date of recording: 20 Mar 2019

Description:

'European Navies and the Conduct of War' considered the different contexts within which European navies operated over a period of 500 years culminating in World War Two, the greatest war ever fought at sea. Taking predominately continental point of view, the book moves away from the typically British-centric approach taken in naval history as it considers the role of European navies in the development of modern warfare, from its medieval origins to the large-scale, industrial, total war of the twentieth century. Along with the growth in navies as instruments of war, the book also explores the long rise of the political and popular appeal of navies, from the princes of late medieval Europe, to the enthusiastic crowds that greeted the modern fleets of the great powers, followed by their reassessment through the great trial by combat, firmly placing the development of modern navies into the broader history of the period.

Speakers:

Alan James is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of War Studies and a member of the Laughton Naval History Unit. He has written widely on France, and its navy, including The Navy and Government in Early Modern France, 1572-1661.

Carlos Alfaro Zaforteza is a Teaching Fellow in the Department of War Studies. He is the author of a number of essays and articles on naval warfare and a member of the Strategic Leadership Project, a joint venture of the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (Madrid) and Instituto Espanol de Estudios Estategicos (Madrid).

Malcolm Murfett is a Visiting Professor in the Department of War Studies and an Associate Editor of the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. He has written a number of books on British foreign and defence policy in Asia and is the author of Naval Warfare 1919-1945.

Mar 22 2019

52mins

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Event: The Eritrean National Service: Servitude For The Common Good and the Youth Exodus

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Event recording from 27/03/2018.

The Eritrean National Service: Servitude For The Common Good and the Youth Exodus - Book Launch by Professor Gaim Kibrea.

Summary: The Eritrean National Service (ENS) lies at the core of the post-independence state, not only supplying its military, but affecting every aspect of the country's economy, its social services, its public sector and its politics. Over half the workforce are forcibly enrolled into it by the government, driving the country's youth to escape national service by seeking employment and asylum elsewhere. Yet how did the ENS, which began during the 1961-91 liberation struggle as part of the idea of the "common good" - in which individual interests were sacrificed in pursuit of the grand scheme of independence and the country's development - degenerate into forced labour and a modern form of slavery? And why, when Eritrea no longer faces existential threat, does the government continue to demand such service from its citizens?

Biographies:

Speaker: Gaim Kibreab is Professor of Research and Director of Refugee Studies, School of Law and Social Science, London South Bank University. He is the author of Eritrea: A dream deferred (James Currey, 2009) and People on the edge of the horn (James Currey, 1996).He earned a PhD degree from Uppsala University, Sweden, Faculty of Social Sciences/Institute of Economic History.

Discussant: John Campbell has worked extensively overseas in various research teaching and development capacities and He has have undertaken consultancies in development for international organization. Prof Campbell has also been directly involved in development projects and programs, particularly in Ethiopia, where he devised and managed a major slum-upgrading project in Addis Ababa.

Chair: Dr Flavia Gasbarr

Apr 13 2018

50mins

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Podcast: The US-UK Special Relationship

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What made the transition of hegemonic power from British to American dominance uniquely cooperative and nonviolent?

In this podcast, Dr Kori Schake analyses the so-called “special relationship” between the United States and the United Kingdom. One of her main argument is that the transition of hegemonic power between the United Kingdom and the United States was peaceful primarily because both countries shared similar domestic ideologies. But how will this special relationship continue under the Trump administration?

Dr Kori Schake is a distinguished research fellow at the Hoover Institute. She is the editor, with Jim Mattis, of the book Warriors and Citizens: American Views of Our Military. She teaches "Thinking About War" at Stanford University, is a contributing editor at the Atlantic, and also writes for War on the Rocks and Foreign Policy.

The KCL Centre for Grand Strategy hosted a public lecture by Dr. Kori Schake on the subject of her most recent book, Safe Passage: The Transition from British to American Hegemony (Harvard University Press).

Dr Schake's lecture was live-streamed and can be accessed here: http://bit.ly/2AwLg3v

This podcast was produced by Ivan Seifert.

UPCOMING EVENTS AT KING'S COLLEGE LONDON

COMPETING MEMORIES: TRUTH AND RECONCILIATION IN SIERRA LEONE AND PERU
12th December | 18:30-19:30 | Bush House 8th Floor North Side
RSVP: http://bit.ly/2kET2Et

Dr Rebekka Friedman brings her unique perspective to the challenges of transitional justice in post-conflict societies. How do the peoples of nations begin healing after tremendous trauma and loss?

FEMALE ENGAGEMENT IN HOSTILE ENVIRONMENTS
17th January | 18:00-19:30 | War Studies Meeting Room (K6.07)
RSVP: http://bit.ly/2jwkYas

Our panel will discuss the creation and evolution of FETs as well as examine how these programmes have shaped the role of women in the military. Our panellists will also explore models of female engagement in hostile environments and the future of military leadership. Register here.

KING'S ENGAGED IN AFRICA: SECURITY AND DEVELOPMENT
RSVP: http://bit.ly/2yP2WYT

Organised by the Africa Research Group (War Studies, KCL) and the African Leadership Centre (KCL), King’s Engaged in Africa showcases the work of King’s College London researchers actively engaged in and with the African continent, and draws on perspectives from the wider African research community. The theme of this year’s conference is ‘Security and Development’ broadly defined.

For more information about upcoming events in the Department of War Studies at King's College London, visit: https://www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/warstudies/events/index.aspx

Dec 08 2017

24mins

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Professor Richard Caplan - Responsibility to Protect: Old Wine in New Bottles?

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Richard Caplan is Professor of International Relations at the University of Oxford. He has also been a Specialist-Advisor to the Select Committee on Foreign Affairs in the UK House of Commons; a Research Associate at the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS), Editor of World Policy Journal, and New York Director of the Institute for War and Peace Reporting (IWPR).

On 9 February 2015 Professor Caplan came to the Department of War Studies to give a talk on ‘Responsibility to Protect: Old Wine in New Bottles?’. The event was part of the CSD Seminar series.

DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

Feb 09 2015

22mins

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2013/14 podcasts: US drone strikes in pakistan

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Mustafa Qadri, Head of Research for Pakistan at Amnesty International, discusses Amnesty's new report on US drone strikes. Mr Qadri was invited to King's by the Afghanistan Studies Research Group. You can find the report ' "Will I be next?" US Drone Strikes in Pakistan' here.
In our series 'Where are they now?' former MA student Barney Henderson, now with the Daily Telegraph, talks about his experience at King's.
Jayne Peake provides details of next week's events.
Presented by Dr Peter Busch
DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

Dec 06 2013

20mins

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Podcast: Fake News and how it affects conflict - 5th episode of our 'Expert' podcast series

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What is fake News? And how can it influence war and conflict? We talked about this with Dr Martin Moore, Senior Lecturer in Political Communication and Director of the Centre for the Study of Media, Communication and Power at King’s College London. The interview was recorded in March 2019.

Nov 30 2019

21mins

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Podcast: 'Social Media and protests in China in 2011' - 4th episode of 'Expert' series

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In episode 4 of our ‘Experts’ series, we explore the use of new and social media in the so-called ‘Jasmine Revolution’ protests in China in 2011 and talk to Professor Kerry Brown, the Director of King’s College’s Lau China Institute. The interview was recorded in March 2019.

Nov 16 2019

18mins

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Podcast: 30th Anniversary of the Fall of the Berlin Wall

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On 9 November 1989 the Berlin Wall was torn down by crowds from both East and West Germany, defining the end of an era not only for Germans but for the world. This week on the War Studies Podcast, we sit down with Dr Barbara Zanchetta, a Cold War historian in the War Studies Department, to discuss the significance of this anniversary.

Event highlight: Africa Week at King's College London
https://www.kcl.ac.uk/events/series/africa-week-2019

Nov 09 2019

14mins

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Event: 'Always at War: British Public Narratives of War' -- new book by Thomas Colley

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'Always at War: British Public Narratives about War' (2019 examines the stories told by a broad cross-section of British society about their country's past, present, and future role in war. Rather than perceiving distinct periods between war and peace, it reveals how British citizens see their nation as so frequently involved in conflict that they see the country as continuously at war. With tensions over Brexit increasing, it reveals the war stories that define British national identity, its relationship with Europe, and considers the place of war in Britain's future.

Dr. Thomas Colley is a Teaching Fellow in the Department of War Studies. The event was organised by King's Centre for Strategic Communications.

Nov 05 2019

26mins

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Event: Engelsberg Applied History Annual Lecture with Margaret MacMillan

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In her lecture titled 'History and International Relations', Prof. MacMillan will discuss how history is used and misused in policymaking. She will go on to examine how historical insight can generate ideas and gauge the possible outcomes of decisions and policies.

This event was hosted by the Centre for Grand Strategy.

Nov 05 2019

44mins

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Podcast: ‘IS propaganda music’ — third episode of 'EXPERTS' podcast series.

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In the second episode of our new podcast series called ‘experts’, we investigate how so-called ‘Islamic State’ uses music as propaganda. Our expert Charlie Winter is Senior Research Fellow at the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation. Like all podcasts in this series, this episode is produced by Department of War Studies students who took the module ‘New Wars, New Media, New Journalism’. This module is convened by Dr Peter Busch who is also presenting this episode. The interview with Charlie was recorded in March 2019.

Nov 02 2019

21mins

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Podcast: 'The Limits of Open Source Intelligence' - second episode of 'EXPERTS' podcast series.

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In the second episode of our new podcast series called ‘experts’, we investigate new media technology affect open source intelligence gathering and we ask what the (ethical) limitations should be. Our expert on this is Dr Huw Dylan who is a senior lecturer in the Department of War Studies. Like all podcasts in this series, this episode is produced by Department of War Studies students who took the module ‘New Wars, New Media, New Journalism’. This module is convened by Dr Peter Busch who is also presenting this episode. The interview with Dr Dylan was recorded in March 2019.

Oct 25 2019

19mins

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Podcast: 'Lone Actor Terrorism' - the first episode of 'EXPERTS' podcast series.

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In the first of our new podcast series called ‘experts’, we investigate how terrorist attacks by lone actors are framed in the media. Our expert on this is Dr Julia Pearce who is a lecturer in the Department of War Studies. Like all podcasts in this series, it is produced by Department of War Studies students who took the module ‘New Wars, New Media, New Journalism’. This module is convened by Dr Peter Busch who is also presented this episode. The interview with Dr Pearce was recorded in March 2019.

Oct 19 2019

21mins

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Podcast: Feminism, International Relations and Global Security - A Conversation with Cynthia Enloe

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This episode brings into conversation Professor Cynthia Enloe, eminent feminist scholar and scholar on militarisation and global politics with Dr Amanda Chisholm, Senior Lecturer on Gender and Security at King's College London (KCL) and Dr Marsha Henry, Assistant Professor in the Gender Department at the London School of Economics (LSE).

Oct 12 2019

44mins

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Event: Borderland Battles: Violence, Crime, and Governance at the Edges of Colombia’s War

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Listen to an event which took place in the summer of 2019 at King's College London for the launch of the book "Borderland Battles: Violence, Crime, and Governance at the Edges of Colombia’s War"

Annette Idler, University of Oxford discussed the findings of her new book, Borderland Battles: Violence, Crime, and Governance at the Edges of Colombia’s War, published by Oxford University Press. Borderland Battles is based on extensive fieldwork: more than 600 interviews in and on the Colombia-Venezuela and Colombia-Ecuador border regions. Applying a "borderland lens" to security dynamics, her focus has been on the convergence of armed conflict and organised crime in these regions: how groups compete for territorial control, how they cooperate, and how they fill governance gaps by playing roles that states normally do. Dr. Idler’s work offers a more holistic and nuanced understanding of “people-centered security” than has been available so far. It has also given her detailed knowledge of the Colombia-Venezuela border zone, which is suffering important consequences of Venezuela’s crisis.

This event was co-hosted by the Latin America and Caribbean Centre (LSE) and the Conflict, Security and Development Research Group (KCL).

Discussant: Professor Gareth Jones, Director of the Latin America and Caribbean Centre, LSE, was

Chair: Dr Kieran Mitton, War Studies, KCL.

Speaker: Dr Annette Idler is the Director of Studies of the Changing Character of War Centre, Senior Research Fellow at Pembroke College, and at the Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Oxford. Dr Idler’s work focuses on the interface of conflict, security, and transnational organised crime. She has published numerous articles in the field of conflict and organised crime, advises governments and international organisations on these subjects, and is a regular expert for internationally renowned media outlets. Dr Idler holds a doctorate from the Department of International Development and St Antony's College, University of Oxford, an MA in International Relations from King’s College London’s Department of War Studies, and a double BA in German-Spanish Studies/International Politics from Complutense University Madrid, Spain, and Regensburg University, Germany.

Oct 05 2019

50mins

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Event: #Metoo Shines a Bright Light on Genuine Security

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Professor Cynthia Enloe, Research Professor in the Department of International Development, Community, and Environment, with affiliations with Women’s and Gender Studies and Political Science, all at Clark University in Worcester, Massachusetts talks about how #Metoo has impacted the ways in which global security is understood, experienced and practiced.

Oct 03 2019

1hr 27mins

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Podcast: Women in terrorism and counterterrorism since 2001

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For decades women have been involved in terrorism, whether carrying out attacks or supporting organisations. They have been victims of terrorist acts, and many have also been involved in diverse aspects of security, including on the front lines with forces trying to reduce the threat from terrorism.

The events of 9/11 triggered years of counter terrorist efforts by the USA and its global partners. However, Dr Joana Cook, Senior Research Fellow at the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, says women were not adequately considered in the counter terrorist strategies developed since the events of 9/11, and this has created a major gap in how we understand and respond to terrorism today.

Sep 21 2019

23mins

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Podcast: Gangs and urban security

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Dennis Rodgers is an ethnographer who joined a Nicaraguan gang in the 1990s as part of his PhD research. Now based at the Geneva Graduate Institute, he spoke to War Studies Podcast about his experiences, from being initiated into a gang to seeing how drug distribution proved a good training for a just-in-time warm tortilla service. The podcast also features a discussion with Kieran Mitton of King's College London about his own work on gangs, including the challenges of achieving meaningful policy change.

Sep 06 2019

33mins

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Podcast: Nonreligion, secularity and security (Summer repeat)

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Religion is an important factor to consider when examining many conflicts around the world, but what about nonreligion? Dr. Stacey Gutkowski, senior lecturer in the DWS and Co-Director of Nonreligion and Secularity Research Network (NSRN) argues that in order to understand conflict, one needs to not only look at individual experiences but also at what religious and nonreligious resources individuals draw on to help inform their ethical understandings and perceptions of the world.

Listen to the 2018 NSRN Annual Lecture, 'Secular Powers and Heretic Undercurrents', by Samuli Schielke which originally accompanied this interview here: https://soundcloud.com/warstudies/nonreligion-and-war-studies

Dr Stacey Gutkowski is a Senior Lecturer in Conflict Studies and Deputy Co-Director of the Centre for the Study of Divided Societies at King’s College London. Prior to joining King’s she was an Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) Postdoctoral Researcher in the Department of International Relations, University of Sussex; a Visiting Scholar at the Center for the Study of Religion and Conflict, Arizona State University; and a Research Associate with the Religion and Ethics in the Making of War and Peace Programme, University of Edinburgh.

Aug 15 2019

17mins

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Podcast: D-Day and the ordinary citizen soldier

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In his first speech as British Prime Minister Boris Johnson once again invited comparisons with his political hero Winston Churchill, suggested that British 'pluck and nerve' were needed to deliver Brexit and mobilised Britain's ports, banks, factories and more on a quasi-war footing.

In light of this, here is an interview recorded for the D-Day commemorations which provides a more rounded perspective of British history through a key episode of the Second World War. Dr Jonathan Fennell discusses the frailty and trauma of the British war experience, Churchill’s objections to the Normandy landings, and the importance not just of the great individuals, but of collective effort of millions of ordinary people in winning the war.

Jul 29 2019

15mins

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Podcast: Queer perspectives in security studies

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This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots in New York City’s gay district, Greenwich Village on June 28, 1969. This event was monumental in the progression of queer rights being a part of human rights. 50 years on, progress has been made with same sex acts becoming legal and being accepted within most parts of society. However, when it comes to safety and security, very little research and data is in place to accurately represent and more importantly protect the queer community.

Dr Jamie J. Hagen, Visiting Fellow of Centre for Women, Peace and Security at the London School of Economics and Politics joined King’s College London’s Senior Lecturer in Security Studies Dr Amanda Chisholm to discuss transgender rights and why we need to queer security studies.

Jul 13 2019

25mins

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Event: Stepchildren Of The Revolution: Gangs in Nicaragua & South Africa

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Date of Recording: 04/07/2019

Description:

This presentation will detail preliminary results of an ethnographic comparison of gang dynamics in Nicaragua and South Africa by Professor Dennis Rodgers (Graduate Institute, Geneva) and Professor Steffen Jensen (Aalborg University, Denmark), being carried out under the auspices of the European Research Council (ERC) Advanced Grant-funded project “Gangs, Gangsters, and Ganglands: Towards a Global Comparative Ethnography” (GANGS). It draws on a systematized consideration of our respective individual trajectories of over 20 years of longitudinal ethnographic research in Nicaragua (by Rodgers) and South Africa (by Jensen), as well as the insights gleaned from the first of four joint cross-site research visits to Nicaragua and South Africa that are taking place in 2019 and 2020.

The presentation explores both the nature of ethnographic comparison as well as the empirical similarities and differences noted between gang dynamics in the two contexts, and offers preliminary conceptual thoughts as to how to interpret these, both with respect to broader contextual factors as well as from the perspective of individual life histories.

Speaker: Professor Dennis Rodgers (The Graduate Institute, Geneva)

For more information on news and upcoming events, please visit our website at KCL.AC.UK/security-studies

Jul 05 2019

1hr 6mins

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Podcast: Human Rights in China with Benedict Rogers

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Date of Publication: 28/06/2019

Description:

Today, the state of human rights in China appears to be at its worse since the 1989 Tiananmen Square Massacre. According to Human Rights Watch, the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) continues to increase its hold over government bureaucracy and has subsumed state bodies in charge of religious, ethnic, and overseas Chinese affairs. Chinese authorities have also significantly increased repression and systematic abuse against religious groups, especially the Turkic Muslims in China’s Xinjiang region, and have continued the arbitrary detention, torture, and enforced disappearance of dissenters and human rights defenders.

Human rights abuses on China’s mainland are very concerning, especially when considering this state’s place in global politics and economic relations. China’s growing power in the international system makes it an exporter of human rights abuse and has allowed China to extend its reach to silence many of its critics across the globe. However, dissenters and human rights defenders in China’s free, autonomous territories such as Hong Kong are obviously the communities that are most at risk of falling victim to human rights abuse by mainland China.

Earlier this month, we saw mass protests take place in Hong Kong in opposition to a now-suspended bill that would have allowed mainland China to extradite individuals from Hong Kong to stand trial. This bill would have removed any protection that the people of Hong Kong had from mainland China’s arbitrary and inhumane criminal justice system. On 16 June, nearly 2 million protesters took to the streets in Hong Kong to express their concerns and resistance to being subject to mainland China’s criminal justice system and successfully pressured leadership to suspend the bill.

In this edition of the War Studies Podcast, we asked Benedict Rogers, founder and chair of the human rights organization Hong Kong Watch, to tell us about the state of human rights in China and the recent protests in Hong Kong around the now suspended extradition bill.

Interviewee bio:

Benedict Rogers specialises in human rights in Asia. He is also co-founder and Chair of Hong Kong Watch. He is the author of six books, and a regular contributor to international media including The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, The Guardian, the Diplomat, The Catholic Herald, and The Huffington Post. and has appeared regularly on the BBC, CNN, Sky News and Al-Jazeera. He is the author of The Darkest Moment: The Crackdown on Human Rights in China 2013-2016. Benedict is a frequent speaker in universities, schools and conferences around the world. He has testified at hearings in the British Parliament, the US Congress, the European Parliament and the Japanese Parliament. He has a BA in History and Politics from Royal Holloway, University of London, and an MA in China Studies from the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS).

Hong Kong Watch website: https://www.hongkongwatch.org/

War Studies Live Stream - China 30 Years After the Tiananmen Massacre (Ben Rogers): https://www.facebook.com/WarStudies/videos/783991868662508/

Jun 29 2019

19mins

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Podcast: Is nuclear energy the answer to the climate crisis?

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The TV series Chernobyl has brought nuclear power back to the public's attention, at precisely the same time as concern about climate change is at record levels. Many see nuclear power as key to curbing carbon emissions and preventing climate change. but do we really have to accept its risks in order to get to a carbon free future? And do the nuclear capacity figures stack up?

This week King’s College London brought academics and industry figures to discuss nuclear energy and climate security. On the podcast hear Dr Simon Chin-Yee, a researcher at King's, discuss his work on the global impacts of climate change and the choices we must make to mitigate further human costs. After that, Philippe Costs, Senior Advisor at the World Nuclear Association, makes the case for nuclear energy in a speech recorded on 13 June at King's College London.

Jun 15 2019

39mins

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Podcast: Military Virtues and Truth Tellers

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Date of Publication: 01/06/2019

Description:

In this week’s podcast, we are going to learn about a fascinating new book on Military Virtues and how military ethics training can improve decision making in the field. Then, we will change tracks to the domain of art and conflict to explore how art can add to analytical research methodologies used in international relations (IR) with the members of the Truth Tellers Pilot study, which seeks to examine the unspeakable aspects of the response to the 2017 Manchester Arena Attack through newly develop art-IR methodologies.

Interviewees:

Military Virtues
https://www.howgatepublishing.com/product-page/militaryvirtues

Professor David Whetham, Professor of Ethics and the Military Profession at the Defence Studies Department and Co-editor of Military Virtues. Learn more about Prof Whetham's work here: https://www.kcl.ac.uk/people/whetham-dr-david

Truth Tellers Project
https://www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/warstudies/research/groups/arts/truthtellers/index

Tom de Freston, artist and writer based in Oxford and member of the Truth Tellers Project.

Mariah Whelan is a poet and academic based in The Centre for New Writing at The University of Manchester.

Dr Pablo de Orellana, Lecturer in International Relations at the Department of War Studies.

Dr Christiana Spens, Lecturer and Writer in the School of International Relations at the University of St. Andrews.

Jun 01 2019

31mins

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