Cover image of The Python Podcast.__init__
(62)

Rank #106 in Technology category

Technology

The Python Podcast.__init__

Updated 3 days ago

Rank #106 in Technology category

Technology
Read more

The podcast about Python and the people who make it great

Read more

The podcast about Python and the people who make it great

iTunes Ratings

62 Ratings
Average Ratings
40
8
11
1
2

Really interesting podcast

By Alex123456789098765431 - Apr 11 2019
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I started listening to this podcast a few weeks ago, and it has been great!

very good

By dingneigorfai - Mar 12 2017
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another awesome python podcast, very informative

iTunes Ratings

62 Ratings
Average Ratings
40
8
11
1
2

Really interesting podcast

By Alex123456789098765431 - Apr 11 2019
Read more
I started listening to this podcast a few weeks ago, and it has been great!

very good

By dingneigorfai - Mar 12 2017
Read more
another awesome python podcast, very informative
Cover image of The Python Podcast.__init__

The Python Podcast.__init__

Latest release on Feb 18, 2020

The Best Episodes Ranked Using User Listens

Updated by OwlTail 3 days ago

Rank #1: Don't Just Stand There, Get Programming! with Ana Bell

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Summary

Writing a book is hard work, especially when you are trying to teach such a broad concept as programming. In this episode Ana Bell discusses her recent work in writing Get Programming: Learn To Code With Python, including her views on how to separate the principles from the implementation, making the book evergreen in its appeal, and how her experience as a lecturer at MIT has helped her maintain the perspectives of beginners. She also shares her views on the values of learning about programming, even when you have no intention of doing it as a career and ways to take the next steps if that is your goal.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • As you know, Python has become one of the most popular programming languages in the world, due to the size, scope, and friendliness of the language and community. But, it can be tough learning it when you’re just starting out. Luckily, there’s an easy way to get involved. Written by MIT lecturer Ana Bell and published by Manning Publications, Get Programming: Learn to code with Python is the perfect way to get started working with Python. Ana’s experience as a teacher of Python really shines through, as you get hands-on with the language without being drowned in confusing jargon or theory. Filled with practical examples and step-by-step lessons to take on, Get Programming is perfect for people who just want to get stuck in with Python. Get your copy of the book with a special 40% discount for Podcast.__init__ listeners at podcastinit.com/get-programming using code: Bell40!
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email hosts@podcastinit.com)
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at podcastinit.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Ana Bell about her book, Get Programming: Learn to code with Python, and her approach to teaching how to code

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by describing your motivation for writing a book about learning to program?
    • Who is the target audience for this book?
    • What level of competence do you want the reader to have when they have completed it?
  • What were the most challenging aspects of writing a book for beginning programmers?
    • What did you do to recapture the “beginner mind” while writing?
  • There are a large variety of books on learning to program and at least as many approaches. Can you describe the techniques that you use in your book to help readers grasp the concepts that you cover?
  • One of the problems of writing a book about technology is that there is no stationary target to aim for due to the constant advancement of the industry. How do you reconcile that reality with the need for a book to remain relevant for an extended period of time?
    • How do you decide what to include and what to leave out when writing about learning how to program?
  • What advice do you have for people who have read your book and want to continue on to a career in development?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Aug 20 2018

35mins

Play

Rank #2: Using Deliberate Practice To Level Up Your Python

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Summary

An effective strategy for teaching and learning is to rely on well structured exercises and collaboration for practicing the material. In this episode long time Python trainer Reuven Lerner reflects on the lessons that he has learned in the 5 years since his first appearance on the show, how his teaching has evolved, and the ways that he has incorporated more hands-on experiences into his lessons. This was a great conversation about the benefits of being deliberate in your approach to ongoing education in the field of technology, as well as having some helpful references for ways to keep your own skills sharp.

Announcements

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app or want to try a project you hear about on the show, you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so take a look at our friends over at Linode. With 200 Gbit/s private networking, scalable shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40 Gbit/s public network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. And for your tasks that need fast computation, such as training machine learning models, they just launched dedicated CPU instances. Go to pythonpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute. And don’t forget to thank them for their continued support of this show!
  • You listen to this show to learn and stay up to date with the ways that Python is being used, including the latest in machine learning and data analysis. For even more opportunities to meet, listen, and learn from your peers you don’t want to miss out on this year’s conference season. We have partnered with organizations such as O’Reilly Media, Corinium Global Intelligence, ODSC, and Data Council. Upcoming events include the Software Architecture Conference in NYC, Strata Data in San Jose, and PyCon US in Pittsburgh. Go to pythonpodcast.com/conferences to learn more about these and other events, and take advantage of our partner discounts to save money when you register today.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m pleased to welcome back Reuven Lerner to talk about the benefits of deliberate practice for learning and improving programming skills

Interview

  • Introductions

  • How did you get introduced to Python?

  • In your first appearance on the show back in episode 2 we talked about your experience as a Python trainer. How has your teaching style evolved in the past 5 years?

    • How has the focus and scope of your training changed in that time period?
  • What have you found to be some of the most helpful and effective tactics in your training?

  • From the learner perspective, what are some strategies that you recommend for retaining information, particularly in the context of gaining technical knowledge?

  • In-person training vs. real-time online training vs. recorded videos, advantages and disadvantages of each.

  • Blended learning, in which we combine aspects of the above

    • Beyond in-person training, what are your preferred methods for learning and maintaining new skills?
  • What is deliberate practice and how does it differ from the habits that many of us might default to?

    • What are some of the resources that you provide for students of your trainings for practicing?
    • What are some of the outside resources which you have found most useful or effective?

Keep In Touch

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Jan 13 2020

48mins

Play

Rank #3: Thonny: The IDE For Beginning Programmers with Aivar Annamaa

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Summary

Learning to program is a rewarding pursuit, but is often challenging. One of the roadblocks on the way to proficiency is getting a development environment installed and configured. In order to simplify that process Aivar Annamaa built Thonny, a Python IDE designed for beginning programmers. In this episode he discusses his initial motivations for starting Thonny and how it helps newcomers to Python learn and understand how to write software.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • For complete visibility into your application stack, deployment tracking, and powerful alerting, DataDog has got you covered. With their monitoring, metrics, and log collection agent, including extensive integrations and distributed tracing, you’ll have everything you need to find and fix bugs in no time. Go to podcastinit.com/datadog today to start your free 14 day trial and get a sweet new T-Shirt.
  • To get worry-free releases download GoCD, the open source continous delivery server built by Thoughworks. You can use their pipeline modeling and value stream map to build, control and monitor every step from commit to deployment in one place. Go to podcastinit.com/gocd to learn more about their professional support services and enterprise add-ons.
  • Visit podcastinit.com to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Aivar Annamaa about Thonny, a Python IDE for beginning programmers

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • What was your motivation for building an IDE focused on beginning programmers?
  • What are the features of Thonny that make it easier for users to understand what is happening in their programs?
  • What have you found to be the types of issues that users most frequently struggle with and how does Thonny help overcome those gaps in understanding?
  • What kinds of tutorials or supporting material have you found to be the most useful for teaching students the principles that they need to be able to take advantage of the environment that Thonny provides?
  • How is Thonny built and what have been the most challenging aspects of writing an IDE in Python?
  • What are some of the interface design choices that you have made to avoid confusing or overwhelming beginning users?
  • Once a user becomes more proficient in Python is there a point where it no longer makes sense to continue using Thonny for development?
  • I noticed that Thonny has an plugin architecture and there is an extension for interacting with the BBC micro:bit. What are some of the other types of extensions that you would like to see built for Thonny?

Keep In Touch

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Mar 18 2018

29mins

Play

Rank #4: Web Application Development Entirely In Python

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Summary

The knowledge and effort required for building a fully functional web application has grown at an accelerated rate over the past several years. This introduces a barrier to entry that excludes large numbers of people who could otherwise be producing valuable and interesting services. To make the onramp easier Meredydd Luff and Ian Davies created Anvil, a platform for full stack web development in pure Python. In this episode Meredydd explains how the Anvil platform is built and how you can use it to build and deploy your own projects. He also shares some examples of people who were able to create profitable businesses themselves because of the reduced complexity. It was interesting to get Meredydd’s perspective on the state of the industry for web development and hear his vision of how Anvil is working to make it available for everyone.

Announcements

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app or want to try a project you hear about on the show, you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so take a look at our friends over at Linode. With 200 Gbit/s private networking, scalable shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40 Gbit/s public network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. And for your tasks that need fast computation, such as training machine learning models, they just launched dedicated CPU instances. Go to pythonpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute. And don’t forget to thank them for their continued support of this show!
  • And to keep track of how your team is progressing on building new features and squashing bugs, you need a project management system designed by software engineers, for software engineers. Clubhouse lets you craft a workflow that fits your style, including per-team tasks, cross-project epics, a large suite of pre-built integrations, and a simple API for crafting your own. With such an intuitive tool it’s easy to make sure that everyone in the business is on the same page. Podcast.init listeners get 2 months free on any plan by going to pythonpodcast.com/clubhouse today and signing up for a trial.
  • Bots and automation are taking over whole categories of online interaction. Discover.bot is an online community designed to serve as a platform-agnostic digital space for bot developers and enthusiasts of all skill levels to learn from one another, share their stories, and move the conversation forward together. They regularly publish guides and resources to help you learn about topics such as bot development, using them for business, and the latest in chatbot news. For newcomers to the space they have the Beginners Guide To Bots that will teach you the basics of how bots work, what they can do, and where they are developed and published. To help you choose the right framework and avoid the confusion about which NLU features and platform APIs you will need they have compiled a list of the major options and how they compare. Go to pythonpodcast.com/discoverbot today to get started and thank them for their support of the show.
  • You listen to this show to learn and stay up to date with the ways that Python is being used, including the latest in machine learning and data analysis. For even more opportunities to meet, listen, and learn from your peers you don’t want to miss out on this year’s conference season. We have partnered with organizations such as O’Reilly Media, Dataversity, and the Open Data Science Conference. Coming up this fall is the combined events of Graphorum and the Data Architecture Summit. The agendas have been announced and super early bird registration for up to $300 off is available until July 26th, with early bird pricing for up to $200 off through August 30th. Use the code BNLLC to get an additional 10% off any pass when you register. Go to pythonpodcast.com/conferences to learn more and take advantage of our partner discounts when you register.
  • The Python Software Foundation is the lifeblood of the community, supporting all of us who want to run workshops and conferences, run development sprints or meetups, and ensuring that PyCon is a success every year. They have extended the deadline for their 2019 fundraiser until June 30th and they need help to make sure they reach their goal. Go to pythonpodcast.com/psf today to make a donation. If you’re listening to this after June 30th of 2019 then consider making a donation anyway!
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email hosts@podcastinit.com)
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at pythonpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Meredydd Luff about Anvil, platform for building full stack web applications entirely in Python

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by explaining what Anvil is and the story of how and why you created it?
  • Web applications come in a vast array of styles. What are the primary formats of web applications that Anvil supports building and what are its limitations?
  • Are there certain categories of users that tend to gravitate toward Anvil?
    • How do you approach user experience design and overall usability given the varied backgrounds of your customers?
  • For someone who wants to use Anvil can you talk through a typical workflow and highlight the different components of the platform?
  • Can you describe how Anvil itself is implemented and how it has evolved since you first began working on it?
    • For the javascript transpilation, are you using an existing project such as Transcrypt or PyJS, or did you develop your own?
  • Given that the Python dependencies on your servers are managed by how, how do you approach version upgrades to avoid breaking your customer’s applications?
  • What are the main assumptions that you had going into the project and how have those assumptions been challenged or updated in the process of growing the business?
  • What have been some of the biggest challenges that you have faced in the process of building and growing Anvil?
    • What are some of the edge cases that you have run into while developing Anvil? (e.g. browser APIs, javascript <-> Python impedance mismatch, etc.)
  • Can you talk through how you manage deployments of your customer’s applications?
  • What are some of the features of Anvil that are often overlooked, under-utilized, or misunderstood which you think users would benefit from knowing about?
  • What are some of the most interesting/innovative/unexpected ways that you have seen Anvil used?
  • What are the limitations of Anvil and when is it the wrong choice?
  • What do you have planned for the future of Anvil?

Keep In Touch

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Jun 10 2019

57mins

Play

Rank #5: Destroy All Software With Gary Bernhardt

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Summary

Many developers enter the market from backgrounds that don’t involve a computer science degree, which can lead to blind spots of how to approach certain types of problems. Gary Bernhardt produces screen casts and articles that aim to teach these principles with code to make them approachable and easy to understand. In this episode Gary discusses his views on the state of software education, both in academia and bootcamps, the theoretical concepts that he finds most useful in his work, and some thoughts on how to build better software.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 200Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Finding a bug in production is never a fun experience, especially when your users find it first. Airbrake error monitoring ensures that you will always be the first to know so you can deploy a fix before anyone is impacted. With open source agents for Python 2 and 3 it’s easy to get started, and the automatic aggregations, contextual information, and deployment tracking ensure that you don’t waste time pinpointing what went wrong. Go to podcastinit.com/airbrake today to sign up and get your first 30 days free, and 50% off 3 months of the Startup plan.
  • To get worry-free releases download GoCD, the open source continous delivery server built by Thoughworks. You can use their pipeline modeling and value stream map to build, control and monitor every step from commit to deployment in one place. And with their new Kubernetes integration it’s even easier to deploy and scale your build agents. Go to podcastinit.com/gocd to learn more about their professional support services and enterprise add-ons.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email hosts@podcastinit.com)
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Gary Bernhardt about teaching and learning Python in the current software landscape

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • As someone who makes a living from teaching aspects of programming what is your view on the state of software education?
    • What are some of the ways that we as an industry can improve the experience of new developers?
    • What are we doing right?
  • You spend a lot of time exploring some of the fundamental aspects of programming and computation. What are some of the lessons that you have learned which transcend software languages?
    • Utility of graphs in understanding software
    • Mechanical sympathy
  • What are the benefits of ‘from scratch’ tutorials that explore the steps involved in building simple versions of complex topics such as compilers or web frameworks?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Apr 30 2018

52mins

Play

Rank #6: Understanding Machine Learning Through Visualizations with Benjamin Bengfort and Rebecca Bilbro

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Summary

Machine learning models are often inscrutable and it can be difficult to know whether you are making progress. To improve feedback and speed up iteration cycles Benjamin Bengfort and Rebecca Bilbro built Yellowbrick to easily generate visualizations of model performance. In this episode they explain how to use Yellowbrick in the process of building a machine learning project, how it aids in understanding how different parameters impact the outcome, and the improved understanding among teammates that it creates. They also explain how it integrates with the scikit-learn API, the difficulty of producing effective visualizations, and future plans for improvement and new features.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • To get worry-free releases download GoCD, the open source continous delivery server built by Thoughworks. You can use their pipeline modeling and value stream map to build, control and monitor every step from commit to deployment in one place. And with their new Kubernetes integration it’s even easier to deploy and scale your build agents. Go to podcastinit.com/gocd to learn more about their professional support services and enterprise add-ons.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email hosts@podcastinit.com)
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Rebecca Bilbro and Benjamin Bengfort about Yellowbrick, a scikit extension to use visualizations for assisting with model selection in your data science projects.

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you describe the use case for Yellowbrick and how the project got started?
  • What is involved in visualizing scikit-learn models?
    • What kinds of information do the visualizations convey?
    • How do they aid in understanding what is happening in the models?
  • How much direction does yellowbrick provide in terms of knowing which visualizations will be helpful in various circumstances?
  • What does the workflow look like for someone using Yellowbrick while iterating on a data science project?
  • What are some of the common points of confusion that your students encounter when learning data science and how has yellowbrick assisted in achieving understanding?
  • How is Yellowbrick iplemented and how has the design changed over the lifetime of the project?
  • What would be required to integrate with other visualization libraries and what benefits (if any) might that provide?
    • What about other ML frameworks?
  • What are some of the most challenging or unexpected aspects of building and maintaining Yellowbrick?
  • What are the limitations or edge cases for yellowbrick?
  • What do you have planned for the future of yellowbrick?
  • Beyond visualization, what are some of the other areas that you would like to see innovation in how data science is taught and/or conducted to make it more accessible?

Keep In Touch

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Jun 17 2018

55mins

Play

Rank #7: Wes McKinney's Career In Python For Data Analysis

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Summary

Python has become one of the dominant languages for data science and data analysis. Wes McKinney has been working for a decade to make tools that are easy and powerful, starting with the creation of Pandas, and eventually leading to his current work on Apache Arrow. In this episode he discusses his motivation for this work, what he sees as the current challenges to be overcome, and his hopes for the future of the industry.

Announcements

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app or want to try a project you hear about on the show, you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so take a look at our friends over at Linode. With 200 Gbit/s private networking, scalable shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40 Gbit/s public network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. And for your tasks that need fast computation, such as training machine learning models, they just launched dedicated CPU instances. Go to pythonpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute. And don’t forget to thank them for their continued support of this show!
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email hosts@podcastinit.com)
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at pythonpodcast.com/chat
  • Check out the Practical AI podcast from our friends at Changelog Media to learn and stay up to date with what’s happening in AI
  • You listen to this show to learn and stay up to date with the ways that Python is being used, including the latest in machine learning and data analysis. For even more opportunities to meet, listen, and learn from your peers you don’t want to miss out on this year’s conference season. We have partnered with O’Reilly Media for the Strata conference in San Francisco on March 25th and the Artificial Intelligence conference in NYC on April 15th. Here in Boston, starting on May 17th, you still have time to grab a ticket to the Enterprise Data World, and from April 30th to May 3rd is the Open Data Science Conference. Go to pythonpodcast.com/conferences to learn more and take advantage of our partner discounts when you register.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Wes McKinney about his contributions to the Python community and his current projects to make data analytics easier for everyone

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • You have spent a large portion of your career on building tools for data science and analytics in the Python ecosystem. What is your motivation for focusing on this problem domain?
  • Having been an open source author and contributor for many years now, what are your current thoughts on paths to sustainability?
  • What are some of the common challenges pertaining to data analysis that you have experienced in the various work environments and software projects that you have been involved in?
    • What area(s) of data science and analytics do you find are not receiving the attention that they deserve?
  • Recently there has been a lot of focus and excitement around the capabilities of neural networks and deep learning. In your experience, what are some of the shortcomings or blind spots to that class of approach that would be better served by other classes of solution?
  • Your most recent work is focused on the Arrow project for improving interoperability across languages. What are some of the cases where a Python developer would want to incorporate capabilities from other runtimes?
    • Do you think that we should be working to replicate some of those capabilities into the Python language and ecosystem, or is that wasted effort that would be better spent elsewhere?
  • Now that Pandas has been in active use for over a decade and you have had the opportunity to get some space from it, what are your thoughts on its success?
    • With the perspective that you have gained in that time, what would you do differently if you were starting over today?
  • You are best known for being the creator of Pandas, but can you list some of the other achievements that you are most proud of?
  • What projects are you most excited to be working on in the near to medium future?
  • What are your grand ambitions for the future of the data science community, both in and outside of the Python ecosystem?
  • Do you have any parting advice for active or aspiring data scientists, or resources that you would like to recommend?

Keep In Touch

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Mar 18 2019

51mins

Play

Rank #8: Algorithmic Trading In Python Using Open Tools And Open Data

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Summary

Algorithmic trading is a field that has grown in recent years due to the availability of cheap computing and platforms that grant access to historical financial data. QuantConnect is a business that has focused on community engagement and open data access to grant opportunities for learning and growth to their users. In this episode CEO Jared Broad and senior engineer Alex Catarino explain how they have built an open source engine for testing and running algorithmic trading strategies in multiple languages, the challenges of collecting and serving currrent and historical financial data, and how they provide training and opportunity to their community members. If you are curious about the financial industry and want to try it out for yourself then be sure to listen to this episode and experiment with the QuantConnect platform for free.

Announcements

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app or want to try a project you hear about on the show, you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so take a look at our friends over at Linode. With 200 Gbit/s private networking, scalable shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40 Gbit/s public network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. And for your tasks that need fast computation, such as training machine learning models, they just launched dedicated CPU instances. Go to pythonpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute. And don’t forget to thank them for their continued support of this show!
  • And to keep track of how your team is progressing on building new features and squashing bugs, you need a project management system designed by software engineers, for software engineers. Clubhouse lets you craft a workflow that fits your style, including per-team tasks, cross-project epics, a large suite of pre-built integrations, and a simple API for crafting your own. With such an intuitive tool it’s easy to make sure that everyone in the business is on the same page. Podcast.init listeners get 2 months free on any plan by going to pythonpodcast.com/clubhouse today and signing up for a trial.
  • You listen to this show to learn and stay up to date with the ways that Python is being used, including the latest in machine learning and data analysis. For even more opportunities to meet, listen, and learn from your peers you don’t want to miss out on this year’s conference season. We have partnered with organizations such as O’Reilly Media, Dataversity, and the Open Data Science Conference. Coming up this fall is the combined events of Graphorum and the Data Architecture Summit. The agendas have been announced and super early bird registration for up to $300 off is available until July 26th, with early bird pricing for up to $200 off through August 30th. Use the code BNLLC to get an additional 10% off any pass when you register. Go to pythonpodcast.com/conferences to learn more and take advantage of our partner discounts when you register.
  • The Python Software Foundation is the lifeblood of the community, supporting all of us who want to run workshops and conferences, run development sprints or meetups, and ensuring that PyCon is a success every year. They have extended the deadline for their 2019 fundraiser until June 30th and they need help to make sure they reach their goal. Go to pythonpodcast.com/psf today to make a donation. If you’re listening to this after June 30th of 2019 then consider making a donation anyway!
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email hosts@podcastinit.com)
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at pythonpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Jared Broad and Alex Catarino about QuantConnect, a platform for building and testing algorithmic trading strategies on open data and cloud resources

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by explaining what QuantConnect is and how the business got started?
  • What is your mission for the company?
  • I know that there are a few other entrants in this market. Can you briefly outline how you compare to the other platforms and maybe characterize the state of the industry?
  • What are the main ways that you and your customers use Python?
  • For someone who is new to the space can you talk through what is involved in writing and testing a trading algorithm?
  • Can you talk through how QuantConnect itself is architected and some of the products and components that comprise your overall platform?
  • I noticed that your trading engine is open source. What was your motivation for making that freely available and how has it influenced your design and development of the project?
  • I know that the core product is built in C# and offers a bridge to Python. Can you talk through how that is implemented?
    • How do you address latency and performance when bridging those two runtimes given the time sensitivity of the problem domain?
  • What are the benefits of using Python for algorithmic trading and what are its shortcomings?
    • How useful and practical are machine learning techniques in this domain?
  • Can you also talk through what Alpha Streams is, including what makes it unique and how it benefits the users of your platform?
  • I appreciate the work that you are doing to foster a community around your platform. What are your strategies for building and supporting that interaction and how does it play into your product design?
  • What are the categories of users who tend to join and engage with your community?
  • What are some of the most interesting, innovative, or unexpected tactics that you have seen your users employ?
  • For someone who is interested in getting started on QuantConnect what is the onboarding process like?
    • What are some resources that you would recommend for someone who is interested in digging deeper into this domain?
  • What are the trends in quantitative finance and algorithmic trading that you find most exciting and most concerning?
  • What do you have planned for the future of QuantConnect?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Jun 17 2019

50mins

Play

Rank #9: Learning To Program In Python With CodeGrades

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Summary

With the increasing role of software in our world there has been an accompanying focus on teaching people to program. There are numerous approaches that have been attempted to achieve this goal with varying levels of success. Nicholas Tollervey has begun a new effort that blends the approach adopted by musicians and martial artists that uses a series of grades to provide recognition for the achievements of students. In this episode he explains how he has structured the study groups, syllabus, and evaluations to help learners build projects based on their interests and guide their own education while incorporating useful skills that are necessary for a career in software. If you are interested in learning to program, teach others, or act as a mentor then give this a listen and then get in touch with Nicholas to help make this endeavor a success.

Announcements

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app or want to try a project you hear about on the show, you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so take a look at our friends over at Linode. With 200 Gbit/s private networking, scalable shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40 Gbit/s public network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. And for your tasks that need fast computation, such as training machine learning models, they just launched dedicated CPU instances. Go to pythonpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute. And don’t forget to thank them for their continued support of this show!
  • You listen to this show to learn and stay up to date with the ways that Python is being used, including the latest in machine learning and data analysis. For even more opportunities to meet, listen, and learn from your peers you don’t want to miss out on this year’s conference season. We have partnered with organizations such as O’Reilly Media, Dataversity, Corinium Global Intelligence. Coming up this fall is the combined events of Graphorum and the Data Architecture Summit. The agendas have been announced and super early bird registration for up to $300 off is available until July 26th, with early bird pricing for up to $200 off through August 30th. Use the code BNLLC to get an additional 10% off any pass when you register. Go to pythonpodcast.com/conferences to learn more and take advantage of our partner discounts when you register.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email hosts@podcastinit.com)
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at pythonpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today Nicholas Tollervey is back to talk about his work on CodeGrades, a new effort that he is building to blend his backgrounds in music, education, and software to help teach kids of all ages how to program.

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by describing what CodeGrades is and what motivated you to start this project?
    • How does it differ from other approaches to teaching software development that you have encountered?
    • Is there a particular age or level of background knowledge that you are targeting with the curriculum that you are developing?
  • What are the criteria that you are measuring against and how does that criteria change as you progress in grade levels?
  • For someone who completes the full set of levels, what level of capability would you expect them to have as a developer?
  • Given your affiliation with the Python community it is understandable that you would target that language initially. What would be involved in adapting the curriculum, mentorship, and assessments to other languages?
    • In what other ways can this idea and platform be adapted to accomodate other engineering skills? (e.g. system administration, statistics, graphic design, etc.)
  • What interesting/exciting/unexpected outcomes and lessons have you found while iterating on this idea?
  • For engineers who would like to be involved in the CodeGrades platform, how can they contribute?
  • What challenges do you anticipate as you continue to develop the curriculum and mentor networks?
  • How do you envision the future of CodeGrades taking ship in the medium to long term?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Aug 12 2019

1hr 4mins

Play

Rank #10: Combining Python And SQL To Build A PyData Warehouse

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Summary

The ecosystem of tools and libraries in Python for data manipulation and analytics is truly impressive, and continues to grow. There are, however, gaps in their utility that can be filled by the capabilities of a data warehouse. In this episode Robert Hodges discusses how the PyData suite of tools can be paired with a data warehouse for an analytics pipeline that is more robust than either can provide on their own. This is a great introduction to what differentiates a data warehouse from a relational database and ways that you can think differently about running your analytical workloads for larger volumes of data.

Announcements

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app or want to try a project you hear about on the show, you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so take a look at our friends over at Linode. With 200 Gbit/s private networking, scalable shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40 Gbit/s public network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. And for your tasks that need fast computation, such as training machine learning models, they just launched dedicated CPU instances. Go to pythonpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute. And don’t forget to thank them for their continued support of this show!
  • Taking a look at recent trends in the data science and analytics landscape, it’s becoming increasingly advantageous to have a deep understanding of both SQL and Python. A hybrid model of analytics can achieve a more harmonious relationship between the two languages. Read more about the Python and SQL Intersection in Analytics at mode.com/init. Specifically, we’re going to be focusing on their similarities, rather than their differences.
  • You listen to this show to learn and stay up to date with the ways that Python is being used, including the latest in machine learning and data analysis. For even more opportunities to meet, listen, and learn from your peers you don’t want to miss out on this year’s conference season. We have partnered with organizations such as O’Reilly Media, Dataversity, Corinium Global Intelligence, and Data Council. Upcoming events include the O’Reilly AI conference, the Strata Data conference, the combined events of the Data Architecture Summit and Graphorum, and Data Council in Barcelona. Go to pythonpodcast.com/conferences to learn more about these and other events, and take advantage of our partner discounts to save money when you register today.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Robert Hodges about how the PyData ecosystem can play nicely with data warehouses

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • To start with, can you give a quick overview of what a data warehouse is and how it differs from a "regular" database for anyone who isn’t familiar with them?
    • What are the cases where a data warehouse would be preferable and when are they the wrong choice?
  • What capabilities does a data warehouse add to the PyData ecosystem?
  • For someone who doesn’t yet have a warehouse, what are some of the differentiating factors among the systems that are available?
  • Once you have a data warehouse deployed, how does it get populated and how does Python fit into that workflow?
  • For an analyst or data scientist, how might they interact with the data warehouse and what tools would they use to do so?
  • What are some potential bottlenecks when dealing with the volumes of data that can be contained in a warehouse within Python?
    • What are some ways that you have found to scale beyond those bottlenecks?
  • How does the data warehouse fit into the workflow for a machine learning or artificial intelligence project?
  • What are some of the limitations of data warehouses in the context of the Python ecosystem?
  • What are some of the trends that you see going forward for the integration of the PyData stack with data warehouses?
    • What are some challenges that you anticipate the industry running into in the process?
  • What are some useful references that you would recommend for anyone who wants to dig deeper into this topic?

Keep In Touch

Picks

Closing Announcements

  • Thank you for listening! Don’t forget to check out our other show, the Data Engineering Podcast for the latest on modern data management.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the mailing list, and read the show notes.
  • If you’ve learned something or tried out a project from the show then tell us about it! Email hosts@podcastinit.com) with your story.
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at pythonpodcast.com/chat

Links

The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Sep 02 2019

43mins

Play

Rank #11: Classic Computer Science For Pythonistas

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Summary

Software development is a career that attracts people from all backgrounds, and Python in particular helps to make it an approachable occupation. Because of the variety of paths that can be taken it is becoming increasingly common for practitioners to bypass the traditional computer science education. In this episode David Kopec discusses some of the classic problems that he has found most useful to understand in his work as a professor and practitioner of software engineering. He shares his motivation for writing the book "Classic Computer Science Problems In Python", the practical approach that he took, and an overview of how the contents can be used in your day-to-day work.

Announcements

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app or want to try a project you hear about on the show, you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so take a look at our friends over at Linode. With 200 Gbit/s private networking, scalable shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40 Gbit/s public network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to pythonpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute. And don’t forget to thank them for their continued support of this show!
  • And to keep track of how your team is progressing on building new features and squashing bugs, you need a project management system designed by software engineers, for software engineers. Clubhouse lets you craft a workflow that fits your style, including per-team tasks, cross-project epics, a large suite of pre-built integrations, and a simple API for crafting your own. Podcast.__init__ listeners get 2 months free on any plan by going to pythonpodcast.com/clubhouse today and signing up for a trial.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email hosts@podcastinit.com)
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at pythonpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing David Kopec about his recent book "Classic Computer Science Problems In Python"

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by discussing your motivation for creating this book and the subject matter that it covers?
    • How do you define a "classic" computer science problem and what was your criteria for selecting the specific cases that you included in the book?
  • What are your favorite features of the Python language, and which of them did you learn as part of the process of writing the examples for this book?
  • Which classes of problems have you found to be most difficult for your readers and students to master?
    • Which do you consider to be most relevant/useful to professional software engineers?
  • I was pleasantly surprised to see introductory aspects of artificial intelligence included in the subject matter that you covered. How did you approach the challenge of making the underlying principles accessible to readers who don’t necessarily have a background in the related fields of mathematics?
  • What are some of the most interesting or unexpected changes that you had to make in the process of adapting your examples from Swift to Python in order to make them appropriately idiomatic?
  • By aiming for an intermediate audience you free yourself of the need to incorporate fundamental aspects of programming, but there can be a wide variety of experiences at that level of experience. How did you approach the challenge of making the text accessible while still being accurate and engaging?
  • What are some of the resources that you would recommend to readers who would like to continue learning about computer science after completing your book?

Keep In Touch

Book Discount And Giveaway

  • Use code podinit19 to get 40% off all Manning products

Picks

Links

The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Feb 04 2019

47mins

Play

Rank #12: Docker Best Practices For Python In Production

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Summary

Docker is a useful technology for packaging and deploying software to production environments, but it also introduces a different set of complexities that need to be understood. In this episode Itamar Turner-Trauring shares best practices for running Python workloads in production using Docker. He also explains some of the security implications to be aware of and digs into ways that you can optimize your build process to cut down on wasted developer time. If you are using Docker, thinking about using it, or just heard of it recently then it is worth your time to listen and learn about some of the cases you might not have considered.

Announcements

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app or want to try a project you hear about on the show, you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so take a look at our friends over at Linode. With 200 Gbit/s private networking, scalable shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40 Gbit/s public network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. And for your tasks that need fast computation, such as training machine learning models, they just launched dedicated CPU instances. Go to pythonpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute. And don’t forget to thank them for their continued support of this show!
  • To connect with the startups that are shaping the future and take advantage of the opportunities that they provide, check out Angel List where you can invest in innovative business, find a job, or post a position of your own. Sign up today at pythonpodcast.com/angel and help support this show.
  • You listen to this show to learn and stay up to date with the ways that Python is being used, including the latest in machine learning and data analysis. For even more opportunities to meet, listen, and learn from your peers you don’t want to miss out on this year’s conference season. We have partnered with organizations such as O’Reilly Media, Dataversity, and the Open Data Science Conference. Coming up this fall is the combined events of Graphorum and the Data Architecture Summit. The agendas have been announced and super early bird registration for up to $300 off is available until July 26th, with early bird pricing for up to $200 off through August 30th. Use the code BNLLC to get an additional 10% off any pass when you register. Go to pythonpodcast.com/conferences to learn more and take advantage of our partner discounts when you register.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email hosts@podcastinit.com)
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at pythonpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Itamar Turner-Trauring about what you need to know about running Python workloads in Docker

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • For anyone who is unfamiliar with it, can you describe what Docker is and the benefits that it can provide?
  • What was your motivation for dedicating so much time and energy to the specific area of using Docker for Python production usage?
  • What are some of the common issues that developers and operations engineers run into when dealing with Docker and its build system?
  • What are some of the issues that are specific to Python that you have run into when using Docker?
  • How does the ecosystem for Python in containers compare to other languages that you are familiar with?
  • What are some of the security issues that engineers are likely to run into when using some of the advice and pre-existing containers that are publicly available?
  • One of the issues that you call out is the speed of container builds. What are some of the contributing factors that lead to such slow packaging times?
    • Can you talk through some of the aspects of multi-layer packages and useful ways to take proper advantage of them?
  • There have been some recent projects that attempt to work around the shortcomings of the Dockerfile itself. What are your thoughts on that overall effort and any specific tools that you have experimented with?
  • When is Docker the wrong choice for a production environment?
    • What are some useful alternatives to Docker, for Python specifically and for software distribution in general that you have had good luck with?

Keep In Touch

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Links

The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Jul 29 2019

44mins

Play

Rank #13: Probabilistic Modeling In Python (And What That Even Means)

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Summary

Most programming is deterministic, relying on concrete logic to determine the way that it operates. However, there are problems that require a way to work with uncertainty. PyMC3 is a library designed for building models to predict the likelihood of certain outcomes. In this episode Thomas Wiecki explains the use cases where Bayesian statistics are necessary, how PyMC3 is designed and implemented, and some great examples of how it is being used in real projects.

Announcements

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app or want to try a project you hear about on the show, you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so take a look at our friends over at Linode. With 200 Gbit/s private networking, scalable shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40 Gbit/s public network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. And for your tasks that need fast computation, such as training machine learning models, they just launched dedicated CPU instances. Go to pythonpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute. And don’t forget to thank them for their continued support of this show!
  • You listen to this show to learn and stay up to date with the ways that Python is being used, including the latest in machine learning and data analysis. For even more opportunities to meet, listen, and learn from your peers you don’t want to miss out on this year’s conference season. We have partnered with organizations such as O’Reilly Media, Dataversity, and the Open Data Science Conference. Go to pythonpodcast.com/conferences to learn more and take advantage of our partner discounts when you register.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email hosts@podcastinit.com)
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at pythonpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Thomas Wiecki about PyMC3, a project for probabilistic programming in Python

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by explaining what probabilistic programming is?
  • What is the PyMC3 project and how did you get involved with it?
  • The opening line for the project README is packed with a slew of terms that are rather opaque to the lay-person. Can you unpack that a bit and discuss some of the ways that PyMC3 is used in real-world projects?
  • How much knowledge of statistical modeling and Bayesian statistics is necessary to make effective use of PyMC3?
  • Can you talk through an example use case for PyMC3 to illustrate how you would use it in a project?
    • How does it compare to the way that you would approach the same problem in a deterministic or frequentist modeling framework?
  • Can you describe how PyMC3 is implemented?
  • There are a number of other projects that build on top of PyMC3, what are some that you find particularly interesting or noteworthy?
  • What do you find to be the most useful features of PyMC3 and what are some areas that you would like to see it improved?
  • What have been the most interesting/unexpected/challenging lessons that you have learned in the process of building and maintaining PyMC3?
  • What is in store for the future of PyMC3?

Keep In Touch

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Links

The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Apr 29 2019

54mins

Play

Rank #14: Helping Teacher's Bring Python Into The Classroom With Nicholas Tollervey

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Summary

There are a number of resources available for teaching beginners to code in Python and many other languages, and numerous endeavors to introduce programming to educational environments. Sometimes those efforts yield success and others can simply lead to frustration on the part of the teacher and the student. In this episode Nicholas Tollervey discusses his work as a teacher and a programmer, his work on the micro:bit project and the PyCon UK education summit, as well as his thoughts on the place that Python holds in educational programs for teaching the next generation.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 200Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email hosts@podcastinit.com)
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at podcastinit.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Nicholas Tollervey about his efforts to improve the accessibility of Python for educators

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • How has your experience as a teacher influenced your work as a software engineer?
  • What are some of the ways that practicing software engineers can be most effective in supporting the efforts teachers and students to become computationally literate?
    • What are your views on the reasons that computational literacy is important for students?
  • What are some of the most difficult barriers that need to be overcome for students to engage with Python?
    • How important is it, in your opinion, to expose students to text-based programming, as opposed to the block-based environment of tools such as Scratch?
    • At what age range do you think we should be trying to engage students with programming?
  • When the teacher’s day was introduced as part of the education summit for PyCon UK what was the initial reception from the educators who attended?
    • How has the format for the teacher’s portion of the conference changed in the subsequent years?
    • What have been some of the most useful or beneficial aspects for the teacher’s and how much engagement occurs between the conferences?
  • What was your involvement in the initiative that brought the BBC micro:bit to UK classrooms?
    • What kinds of feedback have you gotten from students who have had an opportunity to use them?
    • What are some of the most interesting or unexpected uses of the micro:bit that you have seen?

Keep In Touch

Picks

Links

The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Aug 06 2018

59mins

Play

Rank #15: Analyzing Satellite Image Data Using PyTroll

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Summary

Every day there are satellites collecting sensor readings and imagery of our Earth. To help make sense of that information, developers at the meteorological institutes of Sweden and Denmark worked together to build a collection of Python packages that simplify the work of downloading and processing satellite image data. In this episode one of the core developers of PyTroll explains how the project got started, how that data is being used by the scientific community, and how citizen scientists like you are getting involved.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app or want to try a project you hear about on the show, you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With 200 Gbit/s private networking, scalable shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40 Gbit/s public network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to pythonpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • And to keep track of how your team is progressing on building new features and squashing bugs, you need a project management system designed by software engineers, for software engineers. Clubhouse lets you craft a workflow that fits your style, including per-team tasks, cross-project epics, a large suite of pre-built integrations, and a simple API for crafting your own. Podcast.__init__ listeners get 2 months free on any plan by going to pythonpodcast.com/clubhouse today and signing up for a trial.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email hosts@podcastinit.com)
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at pythonpodcast.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Martin Raspaud about PyTroll, a suite of projects for processing earth observing satellite data

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by explaining what PyTroll is and how the overall project got started?
  • What is the story behind the name?
  • What are the main use cases for PyTroll? (e.g. types of analysis, research domains, etc.)
  • What are the primary types of data that would be processed and analayzed with PyTroll? (e.g. images, sensor readings, etc.)
  • When retrieving the data, are you communicating directly with the satellites, or are there facilities that fetch the information periodically which you can then interface with?
  • How do you locate and select which satellites you wish to retrieve data from?
  • What are the main components of PyTroll and how do they fit together?
  • For someone processing satellite data with PyTroll, can you describe the workflow?
  • What are some of the main data formats that are used by satellites?
  • What tradeoffs are made between data density/expressiveness and bandwidth optimization?
  • What are some of the common issues with data cleanliness or data integration challenges?
  • Once the data has been retrieved, what are some of the types of analysis that would be performed with PyTroll?
  • Are there other tools that would commonly be used in conjunction with PyTroll?
  • What are some of the unique challenges posed by working with satellite observation data?
  • How has the design and capability of the various PyTroll packages evolved since you first began working on it?
  • What are some of the most interesting or unusual ways that you have seen PyTroll used?
  • What are some of the lessons that you have learned while building PyTroll that you have found to be most useful or unexpected?
  • What do you have planned for the future of PyTroll?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Jan 07 2019

43mins

Play

Rank #16: Illustrating The Landscape And Applications Of Deep Learning

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Summary

Deep learning is a phrase that is used more often as it continues to transform the standard approach to artificial intelligence and machine learning projects. Despite its ubiquity, it is often difficult to get a firm understanding of how it works and how it can be applied to a particular problem. In this episode Jon Krohn, author of Deep Learning Illustrated, shares the general concepts and useful applications of this technique, as well as sharing some of his practical experience in using it for his work. This is definitely a helpful episode for getting a better comprehension of the field of deep learning and when to reach for it in your own projects.

Announcements

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app or want to try a project you hear about on the show, you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so take a look at our friends over at Linode. With 200 Gbit/s private networking, scalable shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40 Gbit/s public network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. And for your tasks that need fast computation, such as training machine learning models, they just launched dedicated CPU instances. Go to pythonpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute. And don’t forget to thank them for their continued support of this show!
  • You listen to this show to learn and stay up to date with the ways that Python is being used, including the latest in machine learning and data analysis. For even more opportunities to meet, listen, and learn from your peers you don’t want to miss out on this year’s conference season. We have partnered with organizations such as O’Reilly Media, Dataversity, Corinium Global Intelligence, Alluxio, and Data Council. Upcoming events include the combined events of the Data Architecture Summit and Graphorum, the Data Orchestration Summit, and Data Council in NYC. Go to pythonpodcast.com/conferences to learn more about these and other events, and take advantage of our partner discounts to save money when you register today.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Jon Krohn about his recent book, deep learning illustrated

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by giving a brief description of what we’re talking about when we say deep learning and how you got involved with the field?
    • How does your background in neuroscience factor into your work on designing and building deep learning models?
  • What are some of the ways that you leverage deep learning techniques in your work?
  • What was your motivation for writing a book on the subject?
    • How did the idea of including illustrations come about and what benefit do they provide as compared to other books on this topic?
  • While planning the contents of the book what was your thought process for determining the appropriate level of depth to cover?
    • How would you characterize the target audience and what level of familiarity and proficiency in employing deep learning do you wish them to have at the end of the book?
  • How did you determine what to include and what to leave out of the book?
    • The sequencing of the book follows a useful progression from general background to specific uses and problem domains. What were some of the biggest challenges in determining which domains to highlight and how deep in each subtopic to go?
  • Because of the continually evolving nature of the field of deep learning and the associated tools, how have you guarded against obsolescence in the content and structure of the book?
    • Which libraries did you focus on for your examples and what was your selection process?
      • Now that it is published, is there anything that you would have done differently?
  • One of the critiques of deep learning is that the models are generally single purpose. How much flexibility and code reuse is possible when trying to repurpose one model pipeline for a slightly different dataset or use case?
    • I understand that deployment and maintenance of models in production environments is also difficult. What has been your experience in that regard, and what recommendations do you have for practitioners to reduce their complexity?
  • What is involved in actually creating and using a deep learning model?
    • Can you go over the different types of neurons and the decision making that is required when selecting the network topology?
  • In terms of the actual development process, what are some useful practices for organizing the code and data that goes into a model, given the need for iterative experimentation to achieve desired levels of accuracy?
  • What is your personal workflow when building and testing a new model for a new use case?
  • What are some of the limitations of deep learning and cases where you would recommend against using it?
  • What are you most excited for in the field of deep learning and its applications?
    • What are you most concerned by?
  • Do you have any parting words or closing advice for listeners and potential readers?

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Closing Announcements

  • Thank you for listening! Don’t forget to check out our other show, the Data Engineering Podcast for the latest on modern data management.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the mailing list, and read the show notes.
  • If you’ve learned something or tried out a project from the show then tell us about it! Email hosts@podcastinit.com) with your story.
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at pythonpodcast.com/chat

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Oct 22 2019

56mins

Play

Rank #17: Fast Stream Processing In Python Using Faust with Ask Solem

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Summary

The need to process unbounded and continually streaming sources of data has become increasingly common. One of the popular platforms for implementing this is Kafka along with its streams API. Unfortunately, this requires all of your processing or microservice logic to be implemented in Java, so what’s a poor Python developer to do? If that developer is Ask Solem of Celery fame then the answer is, help to re-implement the streams API in Python. In this episode Ask describes how Faust got started, how it works under the covers, and how you can start using it today to process your fast moving data in easy to understand Python code. He also discusses ways in which Faust might be able to replace your Celery workers, and all of the pieces that you can replace with your own plugins.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With private networking, shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40Gbit network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email hosts@podcastinit.com)
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at podcastinit.com/chat
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Ask Solem about Faust, a library for building high performance, high throughput streaming systems in Python

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • What is Faust and what was your motivation for building it?
    • What were the initial project requirements that led you to use Kafka as the primary infrastructure component for Faust?
  • Can you describe the architecture for Faust and how it has changed from when you first started writing it?
    • What mechanism does Faust use for managing consensus and failover among instances that are working on the same stream partition?
  • What are some of the lessons that you learned while building Celery that were most useful to you when designing Faust?
  • What have you found to be the most common areas of confusion for people who are just starting to build an application on top of Faust?
  • What has been the most interesting/unexpected/difficult aspects of building and maintaining Faust?
  • What have you found to be the most challenging aspects of building streaming applications?
  • What was the reason for releasing Faust as an open source project rather than keeping it internal to Robinhood?
  • What would be involved in adding support for alternate queue or stream implementations?
  • What do you have planned for the future of Faust?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Aug 27 2018

28mins

Play

Rank #18: The Past, Present, and Future of Deep Learning In PyTorch

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Summary

The current buzz in data science and big data is around the promise of deep learning, especially when working with unstructured data. One of the most popular frameworks for building deep learning applications is PyTorch, in large part because of their focus on ease of use. In this episode Adam Paszke explains how he started the project, how it compares to other frameworks in the space such as Tensorflow and CNTK, and how it has evolved to support deploying models into production and on mobile devices.

Announcements

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app or want to try a project you hear about on the show, you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so take a look at our friends over at Linode. With 200 Gbit/s private networking, scalable shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40 Gbit/s public network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. And for your tasks that need fast computation, such as training machine learning models, they just launched dedicated CPU instances. Go to pythonpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute. And don’t forget to thank them for their continued support of this show!
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email hosts@podcastinit.com)
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at pythonpodcast.com/chat
  • Check out the Practical AI podcast from our friends at Changelog Media to learn and stay up to date with what’s happening in AI
  • You listen to this show to learn and stay up to date with the ways that Python is being used, including the latest in machine learning and data analysis. For even more opportunities to meet, listen, and learn from your peers you don’t want to miss out on this year’s conference season. We have partnered with O’Reilly Media for the Strata conference in San Francisco on March 25th and the Artificial Intelligence conference in NYC on April 15th. Here in Boston, starting on May 17th, you still have time to grab a ticket to the Enterprise Data World, and from April 30th to May 3rd is the Open Data Science Conference. Go to pythonpodcast.com/conferences to learn more and take advantage of our partner discounts when you register.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Adam Paszke about PyTorch, an open source deep learning platform that provides a seamless path from research prototyping to production deployment

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by explaining what deep learning is and how it relates to machine learning and artificial intelligence?
  • Can you explain what PyTorch is and your motivation for creating it?
    • Why was it important for PyTorch to be open source?
  • There is currently a large and growing ecosystem of deep learning tools built for Python. Can you describe the current landscape and how PyTorch fits in relation to projects such as Tensorflow and CNTK?
    • What are some of the ways that PyTorch is different from Tensorflow and CNTK, and what are the areas where these frameworks are converging?
  • How much knowledge of machine learning, artificial intelligence, or neural network topologies are necessary to make use of PyTorch?
    • What are some of the foundational topics that are most useful to know when getting started with PyTorch?
  • Can you describe how PyTorch is architected/implemented and how it has evolved since you first began working on it?
    • You recently reached the 1.0 milestone. Can you talk about the journey to that point and the goals that you set for the release?
  • What are some of the other components of the Python ecosystem that are most commonly incorporated into projects based on PyTorch?
  • What are some of the most novel, interesting, or unexpected uses of PyTorch that you have seen?
  • What are some cases where PyTorch is the wrong choice for a problem?
  • What is the process for incorporating these new techniques and discoveries into the PyTorch framework?
    • What are the areas of active research that you are most excited about?
  • What are some of the most interesting/useful/unexpected/challenging lessons that you have learned in the process of building and maintaining PyTorch?
  • What do you have planned for the future of PyTorch?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Mar 10 2019

42mins

Play

Rank #19: How To Include Redis In Your Application Architecture

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Summary

The Redis database recently celebrated its 10th birthday. In that time it has earned a well-earned reputation for speed, reliability, and ease of use. Python developers are fortunate to have a well-built client in the form of redis-py to leverage it in their projects. In this episode Andy McCurdy and Dr. Christoph Zimmerman explain the ways that Redis can be used in your application architecture, how the Python client is built and maintained, and how to use it in your projects.

Announcements

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app or want to try a project you hear about on the show, you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so take a look at our friends over at Linode. With 200 Gbit/s private networking, scalable shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40 Gbit/s public network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to pythonpodcast.com/linode to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute. And don’t forget to thank them for their continued support of this show!
  • And to keep track of how your team is progressing on building new features and squashing bugs, you need a project management system designed by software engineers, for software engineers. Clubhouse lets you craft a workflow that fits your style, including per-team tasks, cross-project epics, a large suite of pre-built integrations, and a simple API for crafting your own. Podcast.__init__ listeners get 2 months free on any plan by going to pythonpodcast.com/clubhouse today and signing up for a trial.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email hosts@podcastinit.com)
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at pythonpodcast.com/chat
  • You listen to this show to learn and stay up to date with the ways that Python is being used, including the latest in machine learning and data analysis. For even more opportunities to meet, listen, and learn from your peers you don’t want to miss out on this year’s conference season. We have partnered with O’Reilly Media for the Strata conference in San Francisco on March 25th and the Artificial Intelligence conference in NYC on April 15th. Here in Boston, starting on May 17th, you still have time to grab a ticket to the Enterprise Data World, and from April 30th to May 3rd is the Open Data Science Conference. Go to pythonpodcast.com/conferences to learn more and take advantage of our partner discounts when you register.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Andy McCurdy and Christoph Zimmerman about the Redis database, and some of the various ways that it is used by Python developers

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by explaining what Redis is and how you got involved in the project?
  • How does the redis-py project relate to the Redis database and what motivated you to create the Python client?
  • What are some of the main use cases that Redis enables?
  • Can you describe how Redis-py is implemented and some of the primitives that it provides for building applications on top of?
    • How do the release cycles of redis-py and the Redis database relate to each other?
    • How closely does redis-py match the features of the Redis database?
    • What are some of the convenience methods or features that you have added to make the client more Pythonic?
  • Redis is often used as a key/value cache for web applications, in some cases replacing Memcached. What are the characteristics of Redis that lend themselves well to this purpose?
    • What are some edge cases or gotchas that users should be aware of?
  • What are some of the common points of confusion or difficulties when storing and retrieving values in Redis?
  • What have been some of the most challenging aspects of building and maintaining the Redis Python client?
  • What are some of the anti-patterns that you have seen around how developers build on top of Redis?
  • What are some of the most interesting or unexpected ways that you have seen Redis used?
  • What are some of the least used or most misunderstood features of Redis that you think developers should know about?
  • What are some of the recent and near-future improvements or features in Redis that you are most excited by?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Mar 04 2019

1hr 1min

Play

Rank #20: Entity Extraction, Document Processing, And Knowledge Graphs For Investigative Journalists with Friedrich Lindenberg

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Summary

Investigative reporters have a challenging task of identifying complex networks of people, places, and events gleaned from a mixed collection of sources. Turning those various documents, electronic records, and research into a searchable and actionable collection of facts is an interesting and difficult technical challenge. Friedrich Lindenberg created the Aleph project to address this issue and in this episode he explains how it works, why he built it, and how it is being used. He also discusses his hopes for the future of the project and other ways that the system could be used.

Preface

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • When you’re ready to launch your next app or want to try a project you hear about on the show, you’ll need somewhere to deploy it, so check out Linode. With 200 Gbit/s private networking, scalable shared block storage, node balancers, and a 40 Gbit/s public network, all controlled by a brand new API you’ve got everything you need to scale up. Go to podcastinit.com/linode today to get a $20 credit and launch a new server in under a minute.
  • Visit the site to subscribe to the show, sign up for the newsletter, and read the show notes. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions I would love to hear them. You can reach me on Twitter at @Podcast__init__ or email hosts@podcastinit.com)
  • To help other people find the show please leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, tell your friends and co-workers, and share it on social media.
  • Join the community in the new Zulip chat workspace at podcastinit.com/chat
  • Registration for PyCon US, the largest annual gathering across the community, is open now. Don’t forget to get your ticket and I’ll see you there!
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey and today I’m interviewing Friedrich Lindenberg about Aleph, a tool to perform entity extraction across documents and structured data

Interview

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by explaining what Aleph is and how the project got started?
  • What is investigative journalism?
    • How does Aleph fit into their workflow?
    • What are some other tools that would be used alongside Aleph?
    • What are some ways that Aleph could be useful outside of investigative journalism?
  • How is Aleph architected and how has it evolved since you first started working on it?
  • What are the major components of Aleph?
    • What are the types of documents and data formats that Aleph supports?
  • Can you describe the steps involved in entity extraction?
    • What are the most challenging aspects of identifying and resolving entities in the documents stored in Aleph?
  • Can you describe the flow of data through the system from a document being uploaded through to it being displayed as part of a search query?
  • What is involved in deploying and managing an installation of Aleph?
  • What have been some of the most interesting or unexpected aspects of building Aleph?
  • Are there any particularly noteworthy uses of Aleph that you are aware of?
  • What are your plans for the future of Aleph?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

Nov 19 2018

39mins

Play