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Education

Tes - The education podcast

Updated 3 days ago

Education
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The Tes podcast brings you interviews, news round-ups and research related to education

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The Tes podcast brings you interviews, news round-ups and research related to education

iTunes Ratings

7 Ratings
Average Ratings
3
2
2
0
0

Brilliant

By Gin Soutiere - Nov 12 2018
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I just listened to the pod, Three Golden Rules for supporting autistic pupils and found it so informative. It helped me to further solidify what I could not quite grasp regarding my own 7 year old son’s school environment. We are at a new school, and he is newly diagnosed. This child who was doing quite well at our previous school is now struggling. Though there are other health factors at play (PANS), the rigidity of his teacher has certainly not eased my son’s way. This pod has inspired me to be more proactive in finding the right educational environment/teacher for my son. I think it’s a wonderful episode for parents, teachers, or child care workers in general. I’ve shared it with my spouse, a close friend, my sister, and my son’s therapists. Thank you so much for putting this together for parents/people like me who are searching for answers and understanding.

iTunes Ratings

7 Ratings
Average Ratings
3
2
2
0
0

Brilliant

By Gin Soutiere - Nov 12 2018
Read more
I just listened to the pod, Three Golden Rules for supporting autistic pupils and found it so informative. It helped me to further solidify what I could not quite grasp regarding my own 7 year old son’s school environment. We are at a new school, and he is newly diagnosed. This child who was doing quite well at our previous school is now struggling. Though there are other health factors at play (PANS), the rigidity of his teacher has certainly not eased my son’s way. This pod has inspired me to be more proactive in finding the right educational environment/teacher for my son. I think it’s a wonderful episode for parents, teachers, or child care workers in general. I’ve shared it with my spouse, a close friend, my sister, and my son’s therapists. Thank you so much for putting this together for parents/people like me who are searching for answers and understanding.
Cover image of Tes - The education podcast

Tes - The education podcast

Latest release on Feb 21, 2020

The Best Episodes Ranked Using User Listens

Updated by OwlTail 3 days ago

Rank #1: Pedagogy – Season 4, Episode 9 - Curriculum design with professor Cecilia Chan

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“We need to make our learning authentic, we need to be able to see how it is applicable to real life, and in curriculum all around the world we are failing to do that,” argues Cecilia K Y Chan, head of professional development and an associate professor in the Centre for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning at the University of Hong Kong.

Chan is the guest on this week’s Tes Podagogy podcast and she discusses curriculum choices at length: what we are teaching now, why we make those choices and what impact those choices have on the happiness and future prospects of the current crop of school-age children.

 

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Nov 13 2018

35mins

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Rank #2: Podagogy - Season 7, Episode 5 - attachment-aware teaching with Professor Peter Fonagy

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Teachers are becoming ever-more comfortable talking about attachment when it comes to students who have experienced trauma, but attachment-aware practice should not just be used with the most vulnerable - every child would benefit, according to Professor Peter Fonagy.


Speaking on this week's Podagogy podcast, the head of psychology and language sciences at University College London, explains that attachment is a fundamental part of successful teaching that needs more consideration

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Oct 08 2019

44mins

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Rank #3: Further - 24 April 2019 - Why pit knowledge against skills?

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In this week's podcast Eddie Playfair, senior policy manager at the Association of Colleges and former college principal, joins Tes columnist Sarah Simons to discuss whether knowledge and skills are more closely linked than they may appear

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Apr 25 2019

12mins

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Rank #4: Podagogy - Season 7, Episode 4 - Why we need to level up our understanding of video games, with Dr Peter Etchells

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Gaming has a bad reputation, with accusations ranging from warping young minds to inspiring mass shootings, but the data doesn’t back these ideas up, says Dr Peter Etchells

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Oct 02 2019

39mins

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Rank #5: English Focus - December - Why teachers need to talk better, not less with Andy Tharby

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There has been "a war" on teacher talk over the past decade, says Andy Tharby, English teacher and author of ‘How to Explain Absolutely Anything to Absolutely Anyone: The Art and Science of Teacher Explanation'. In this episode, he discusses the value of teacher talk and what teachers can do to communicate more effectively in the classroom.

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Dec 14 2018

59mins

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Rank #6: Podagogy - Season 8, Episode 3 - Can we really teach creativity, with professor Bill Lucas

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The perception of creativity among some teachers is that it cannot be taught or assessed – or that is separate to knowledge – that’s all wrong, says Professor Bill Lucas. He explains why we can and should teach creativity, and explains the research that shows we can get better at being creative.

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Nov 27 2019

46mins

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Rank #7: Podagogy - Season 6, Episode 10 - behaviour and social, emotional and mental health with Alice Jones

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Dr Alice Jones explores the causes, symptoms and impact of social and emotional difficulties in young people, and looks at how schools can create environments that best support them

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Jul 10 2019

24mins

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Rank #8: English Focus- September - Why it’s time English teachers did less marking with Robin Macpherson

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“I used to love line-by-line forensic marking,” says Robin Macpherson, an assistant head at Dollar Academy. “I’m one of these weird people in that I like marking. If I’ve got a huge pile of marking at the weekend, for most people, that keeps them awake at night, but I just go off to a café somewhere and I like doing it.”

This was Macpherson’s approach to marking when he first started teaching. He promised his pupils that if they got work into him on time, they would get it back the next lesson, marked in detail. This was, he felt, his “mark of respect as a teacher”.

But, Macpherson explains in the latest episode of the Tes English teaching podcast, when he started to read the research around marking, he began to realise that all the time and effort he was putting into writing lengthy comments in students’ books might not be as worthwhile as he had thought.

This week, Carl Hendrick and Robin Macpherson, authors of What Does This Look Like In The Classroom: Bridging The Gap Between Research And Practice talk on the podcast about their own experience of applying research to the teaching of English, and examine the place of research in our classrooms.

Too much marking?

They offer insights into what the experts tell us about three essential areas of teaching: motivation, behaviour and feedback.

“People assume that marking is feedback in its entirety, but they’ve got that wrong. Marking is a small subset of all feedback. It’s just one way in which you can convey to pupils how they are doing,” says Macpherson.

As a result of engaging with research, he has now moved away from those “forensic” marking practices and begun to make more use of peer assessment, self-assessment and whole-class feedback instead, freeing up more time for him to focus on planning – and he believes his teaching has improved as a result.

“Personally, I’ve found it the hardest thing to change about my practice,” he says.

Jamie Thom is an English teacher at Cramlington Learning Village and the author of Slow Teaching: a guide to finding calm, organisation and impact in the classroom. He tweets @teachgratitude1

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Sep 25 2018

55mins

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Rank #9: Podagogy –Season 4, Episode 5 - Teaching writing with professor Dominic Wyse

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Dominic Wyse has a challenge for you: “How often does a child in England get to genuinely do a piece of writing that begins with a blank page and is entirely their own ideas because they think those ideas are important?”

The professor of Early Childhood and Primary Education at the University College London (UCL), Institute of Education (IOE), already thinks he knows your answer.

“I know from my own research and experience, it is incredibly rare,” he states. 

And he says that because this is not happening, pupils are not really learning what it is like to “be a writer”.

Speaking on the Tes Podagogy podcast, professor Wyse explores several different aspects of teaching the writing process. He explains that it has to begin at the earliest ages of school and that, often, this is hampered by teachers not recognising when the youngest pupils believe they are writing.

“They are naturally curious about writing, and they play with the tools of writing given the opportunity. But in some research a PhD student of mine did recently, they found that adults did not pick up on the fact the children were writing when the children were very clear that they were writing. That is an important pedagogical lesson for us.”

He argues that teachers also need a broader appreciation of what writing is, and of its societal context. That means including examples of writing in different media or getting children to compose in different media, be it text messages, snapchats, formal reports, handwritten diaries - the list should be extensive.

“We have to teach writing as it really is, not base it too much on tests or a romantic notion of what it was,” he says.

That said, he is a firm advocate of a mixed approach to writing: part formal, part informal, so that the conventions are taught but creativity and engagement can also be cultivated.

“A general writing area in an early years setting is vital so children can, in any way they feel comfortable (at tables; on the floor on cushions) be making marks and have children interacting with children about those marks," he explains. "But also there is absolutely a place for more teacher-directed activities where teachers can stimulate with things they would like students to learn. Those things should be based on what the teacher has witnessed in those informal writing periods - that’s how they spot where the challenges are.”

In the podcast, he talks through the different stages of teaching writing and the latest research on how best to do it. You can listen via your Podcast provider (tyope in Tes- the education podcast) or via the player below:

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Oct 03 2018

34mins

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Rank #10: Podagogy – Season 1, Episode 4 - Learning to read with professor Daniel Willingham

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The renowned reading expert, professor of psychology at the Unviersity of Virginia, and author of numerous education books including Why Don't Students Like School?  talks to the Tes Podagogy podcast about the three processes children need to get right to become successful readers and why teachers need to overcome the fact that phonics resources tend to be 'boring'.  

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Sep 26 2017

39mins

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Rank #11: Pedagogy – Season 4, Episode 7 - Trauma with professors Essi Viding and Eamon McCrory

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“Children do make choices to misbehave,” states professor Essi Viding, “but the tools they bring to make the choices are different. Someone who has very stable developmental history is making a particular choice with a completely different toolkit than a child who has a unpredictable developmental history.”

Viding is professor of Developmental Psychopathology at UCL and, together with professor Eamon McCrory, professor of Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology at UCL, she studies the impact of trauma on a child’s behaviour at the Developmental Risk and Resilience Unit at UCL. Speaking on this week’s Podagogy podcast, they explain how trauma impacts development, how this affects behaviour and what teachers can  - and should - do about it.

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Oct 31 2018

40mins

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Rank #12: Podagogy – Season 1, Episode 9 - Effective practice with professor Anders Ericsson

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Anders Ericsson, professor of Psychology at Florida State University and the academic behind deliberate practice theory, discusses his expertise research and how to ensure students work at their peak performance.

NOTE: there is some slight clipping of the sound on this podcast due to a technical issue due to the international phone line, it should hopefully not spoil your enjoyment of the interview 

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Nov 08 2017

25mins

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Rank #13: Podagogy - Season 9, Episode 3 - Why we’re doing too much, too young, in education

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“The earlier you go, the more likely you are to pick up kids who may just catch up on their own – they’re just late starters,” states Dorothy Bishop, professor of developmental neuropsychology at the University of Oxford.


At a time when education systems across the world are pushing for educational interventions at ever younger ages, Bishop argues this ignores a huge amount of evidence about what are 4 and 5 year olds should be doing in school - and whether they should be in school at that age at all.

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Feb 05 2020

39mins

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Rank #14: The challenges facing special schools (sponsored)

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Special education is going through a difficult time. For starters, the sector has been struggling with a lack of funding in recent years. At the same time, it’s been adapting to a new code of practice. And, as in the rest of the education sector, there are problems with recruitment and retention.


But with no dedicated teacher training route for special education, there are additional questions as to whether staff are equipped to support children with such complex needs. 


The government has committed another £700 million in funding this year, but where will this be spent? And is it enough?


In this podcast, we speak to Simon Knight, joint headteacher at the Frank Wise school in Banbury, which caters for children aged between two and 19 with severe or profound and multiple learning disabilities.


He tells us about the various problems facing special schools and how he is trying to find solutions.


This podcast was produced in association with Tes Institute. Their Straight to Teaching course allows TAs and support staff to prepare for QTS while remaining in their current school. Find out more about Straight to Teaching

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Oct 27 2019

24mins

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Rank #15: Maths podcast: Cognitive conflict and restructuring

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In this episode, Lucy Rycroft-Smith talks to early years mathematics expert Dr Sue Gifford about overcoming contradictions and confusion

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Nov 10 2019

41mins

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Rank #16: Further - 1st December 2018 - Sue Pember

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This week's podcast features Dr. Sue Pember, director of policy and external relations at HOLEX - the professional body for adult community education and learning. Ms Pember is a former teacher, principal and senior government official, and talks to Sarah Simons about the links between community learning and health. 

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Dec 03 2018

18mins

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Rank #17: Podagogy - Season 7, Episode 1 - project-based learning with Professor Pam Grossman

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A lot of what you think you know about project based learning (PBL) is likely to be wrong, according to Professor Pam Grossman, Dean of the graduate school of education at the University of Pennsylvania.


In this episode, she explains that this approach to teaching suffers from a wide range of misconceptions, mostly because no-one has really agreed what PBL is and reveals how to do it well.

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Sep 11 2019

35mins

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Rank #18: Podagogy – Season 5, Episode 5 - Effective revision with professor John Dunlosky

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“Students do a whole lot of things to prepare for their exams, some of which are good uses of their time and some of which are not,” explains professor John Dunlosky, professor in the department of psychological sciences at Kent State University.

Dunlosky is well placed to tell you which techniques fall into each category: he is behind the oft-quoted paper Improving Students’ Learning With Effective Learning Techniques: Promising Directions From Cognitive and Educational Psychology. Speaking on this week’s Tes Podagogy he provided an overview of the key points from the paper, with some interesting comments on the various techniques and broader education issues.

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Feb 13 2019

37mins

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Rank #19: Podagogy - Season 7, Episode 2 - social mobility with Lee Elliot Major

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Could Bananarama be the answer to social mobility?

Lee Elliot Major, the UK’s first professor of social mobility, explores the systemic issues holding back the country’s young people, and how a bit of Bananarama can help their teachers improve attainment

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Sep 17 2019

31mins

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Rank #20: Tes Scotland Podcast, Episode 4: Chris Smith

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Former teacher of the year Chris Smith tells us about the quality every teacher needs, bombing in front of 600 pupils, the perfect class size, how everyone can succeed in maths, why more teachers should open up about their own mental health, and the false dichotomy between ‘traditional’ and ‘progressive’ education.

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Dec 18 2019

1hr 14mins

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