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Wordslinger Podcast

Updated 13 days ago

Arts
Business
Careers
Books
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Kevin Tumlinson, Bestselling and Award-Winning Thriller Author, talks to authors and entrepreneurs to get their behind-the-scenes story. Each week, you can tune in to a full hour of wisdom and insight from some of the most intriguing people on the planet. It's all about the story here.

Read more

Kevin Tumlinson, Bestselling and Award-Winning Thriller Author, talks to authors and entrepreneurs to get their behind-the-scenes story. Each week, you can tune in to a full hour of wisdom and insight from some of the most intriguing people on the planet. It's all about the story here.

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52 Ratings
Average Ratings
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Motivation

By kafriedrich - Feb 07 2020
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For new writers, experienced writers, and for people in general- Wordslinger plants a seed that makes you want to get going, work on your goals, and feel great about it. The information and interviews are so enlightening and helpful.

Great Podcast for Writers!

By Glenn Dyer - Oct 31 2019
Read more
Kevin has a wonderful interviewing style. He puts his guest at ease which is so necessary in order to pull the best information out for his audience.

iTunes Ratings

52 Ratings
Average Ratings
49
2
0
1
0

Motivation

By kafriedrich - Feb 07 2020
Read more
For new writers, experienced writers, and for people in general- Wordslinger plants a seed that makes you want to get going, work on your goals, and feel great about it. The information and interviews are so enlightening and helpful.

Great Podcast for Writers!

By Glenn Dyer - Oct 31 2019
Read more
Kevin has a wonderful interviewing style. He puts his guest at ease which is so necessary in order to pull the best information out for his audience.
Cover image of Wordslinger Podcast

Wordslinger Podcast

Latest release on May 22, 2020

The Best Episodes Ranked Using User Listens

Updated by OwlTail 13 days ago

Rank #1: Reaching more readers with Ryan Zee

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A book-lover turned entrepreneur, Ryan Zee in 2016 created BookSweeps.com, which is now one of the largest book giveaway & lead generation sites for fiction authors, with an email list of nearly 100,000 readers. Over 3,500 authors have used BookSweeps' promotional services, including some of the top-selling names in romance, mysteries & thrillers, sci-fi & fantasy, Christian fiction, and YA

DID I MENTION?
Cover your nakedness and your shame with a Written World Tee, now with 100% more Kevin words! http://bit.ly/writtenworld-tees

New to Wordslinger Press, pick up Writing a Better Book Description

Pick up a copy of Kevin Tumlinson's newest Dan Kotler archaeological thriller The Stepping Maze - https://books2read.com/stepping-maze

CONNECT ONLINE:
Website:: www.booksweeps.com
Facebook:: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1092781607460063/

--

THIS EPISODE OF THE WORDSLINGER PODCAST IS SPONSORED BY:
Draft2Digital—Convert, publish, and distribute your book worldwide, with support the whole way. https://draft2digital.com/wordslinger

Wordslinger Press—This is your chance to start your indie author career right. Pick up books and other products to help you build and grow a successful writing career. Start growing at http://wordslingerpodcast.com

Support this show: Subscribe and share!

Support us on Patreon: https://patreon.com/wordslingerpodcast

Pick something up to read that will be tough to put down—Archeological Thrillers, Science Fiction, YA Fantasy and more, at https://kevintumlinson.com/books

May 03 2019

1hr 10mins

Play

Rank #2: WPC-145 - Explosive Author Marketing with Jonny Andrews

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With over 15 years in online marketing experience Jonny Andrews has been in digital publishing before Amazon released the Kindle.

MENTIONS:
Jonny last appeared on the Wordslinger Podcast in Episode 75

Pick up a copy of Kevin Tumlinson's newest Dan Kotler archaeological thriller The Girl in the Mayan Tomb - https://books2read.com/mayan-tomb

CONNECT ONLINE:

Website:  authorplatformrocket.com
Twitter: @Jonny_Andrews

THIS WEEK’S INDIE PUBLISHING NEWS:

Draft2Digital Announces Author Pages and Book Tabs — D2D started 2018 by announcing we were going to focus on beefing up our offering at Books2Read.com, and by paying particular attention to tools that will help with author discoverability. To that end, we just announced our new discoverability tools: D2D Author Pages and D2D Book Tabs. These two new resources will showcase both the author and the author’s work (books that is) to new and existing readers. Think of Author Pages as either your author-themed web presence, if you don’t have an author website, or as your book store for your existing site. Book Tabs are product pages that give readers everything they need to make their book buying decision, including a link that sends them to everywhere your book is sold online. These tools are incredible, and you can learn more about them on the official blog post, now with more video walk-thrus! — http://bit.ly/WPC145-D2DAuthorPages

Digital Manga Overtakes Print — Manga, which no one ever seems to be able to pronounce correctly, is hugely popular worldwide, but particularly in Japan. And for the first time, digital sales of manga have outpaced print sales. Digital sales were up 17.2% from the previous year, versus print sales falling 14.4% over last year’s numbers. What makes this interesting is that manga is currently underserved in digital markets. As the rise in popularity starts to indicate a shift in interest from consumers, this could lead to opportunities for some willing and able digital publishers out there. Notably, Amazon’s Comixology acquisition could lead to its dominance in yet another digital publishing field. — http://bit.ly/WPC145-Digital-Manga

No room for pirates in Switzerland — When you think of Switzerland, you think of pirates. No? You probably should, because internet piracy is huge in Switzerland, and impacts a lot of authors. The Swiss Federal Supreme Court is considering dialing back on its previous 2010 decision, which barred anti-piracy agencies from having access to the IP addresses of file servers used by internet pirates. The original ruling made Switzerland something of a safe harbor for pirates, but it also landed Switzerland on the US government’s watchlist, which is sometimes used to limit commerce with Swiss businesses online. Changes to the Swiss policy, which I’ll admit has some holes (heh), could help crack down on one of the biggest thorns in the sides of authors. — http://bit.ly/WPC145-Switzerland-Piracy

THIS EPISODE OF THE WORDSLINGER PODCAST IS SPONSORED BY:

Draft2Digital—Convert, publish, and distribute your book worldwide, with support the whole way. https://draft2digital.com/wordslinger

Wordslinger Press—This is your chance to start your indie author career right. Pick up books and other products to help you build and grow a successful writing career. Start growing at http://wordslingerpodcast.com

Support this show: Subscribe and share!

Support us on Patreon: https://patreon.com/wordslingerpodcast

Pick something up to read that will be tough to put down—Archeological Thrillers, Science Fiction, YA Fantasy and more, at https://kevintumlinson.com/books

___

GOT A QUESTION FOR KEVIN AND HIS GUESTS?

CALL 281-809-WORD (9673)

Mar 16 2018

1hr 8mins

Play

Rank #3: Book Coaching with Jennie Nash, Ep 202

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Jennie Nash, CEO and founder of Author Accelerator, talks about her program for training book coaches to help writers write books worth reading. Kevin and Jennie discuss coaching, as well as Jennie’s new book, Read Books All Day and Get Paid For It: The Business of Book Coaching.

TRANSCRIPT AVAILABLE

LINKS:

Website:: jennienash.com, authoraccelerator.com

Amazon Author Page:: https://www.amazon.com/Jennie-Nash/e/B001HD414A

Twitter Handle:: @jennienash

Facebook Page:: @jennienash

How can people join your mailing list?:https://author-accelerator.ck.page/5d4425a182

Giveaways, promotions, or special offers:A free week of programming on book coaching starting January 20 https://www.authoraccelerator.com/summit

THIS EPISODE OFTHE WORDSLINGER PODCASTIS SPONSORED BY:

DRAFT2DIGITAL: Convert, publish, and distribute your book worldwide, with support the whole way. https://draft2digital.com/wordslinger

ACORNS: Start an Acorns account today and get FREE MONEY! kevintumlinson.com/acorns

TRANSCRIPT:

Jennie Nash - Wordslinger Podcast

SUMMARY KEYWORDS

book, people, author, helping, writers, coaches, money, offering, writing, pay, calls, accelerator, coaching, business, marketing, viable, expertise, service, ideal reader, agent

SPEAKERS

Jennie Nash, Kevin Tumlinson

Kevin Tumlinson 00:02

Hey, everybody, thanks for tuning in. Now I, here's what's interesting about what I do. I travel, I go to all kinds of conferences all over the world. And I meet some some pretty incredible people, and in particular, I meet a lot of folks who work in some aspect of this industry. And that is what happened with today's guest. I'm talking to Jenny Nash. There's a lot of ways that Jenny and I are connected. But one of the first ways we met was at San Francisco writers conference about two, three years ago. I think. I'm not even sure at this point.

Jennie Nash 00:37

Yeah, that's right.

Kevin Tumlinson 00:38

Now, okay, just the official stuff, Jenny, I'll throw it in there. Jenny Nash is the founder and CEO of author accelerator, a company on a mission to train book coaches to help writers write books worth reading. And we're going to be talking to her about that and about her new book, read books all day and get paid for it, the business of book coaching. I'm looking forward to Ironically, we discussed this just before the show, but I've got like back to back, our author consultations all day today. So this is an ironic topic for me to tell people how to make money doing it, that's where I need to start upping my game. like I always do a lot of these for free. So I need to start making some cash on this stuff.

Jennie Nash 01:21

Oh, let's talk about that. Should we jump right into it?

Kevin Tumlinson 01:23

Let's jump right in. Welcome to the show. Thank you. Thank you for being a part of the word slinger podcast. So yes, let's jump right in. And how does somebody make money reading books all day?

Jennie Nash 01:32

So I want to talk about the money because I've been a book coach now for about 10 years. And I make multiple six figures as a book coach, and we at author accelerator. We recently did a poll of about 180 people who do this type of work, and I turned out to be one of the top paid people and that's great for me, but what was horrifying was The number of people who are not making very much money at it and the more that you dug into it, the number of people who give their work away for free and here I am talking to such a person.

Kevin Tumlinson 02:11

I don't give it all away for free, let's just make that clear. But I am obsessed with helping authors succeed and so that sometimes Trumps me charging them for it. I think so.

Jennie Nash 02:22

Okay, so here's the thing. I'm obsessed with that too. And, and it is such a noble and good thing to be obsessed with because, as you well know, the publishing industry is super fast changing all the time things it's pretty chaotic things come, you know, companies come they go trends come and go. There's, you know, self publishing wasn't even a thing. Basically, when I when I started coaching like it, it everything changes so fast. And that combined with this pervasive myth that writers don't make money writers don't have money to spend to help them. or invest in their careers, this whole starving artist thing this whole, you know, oh, we all just do this for love thing. And it makes me crazy because so many of the myths that I just spun off are not true writers, a lot of writers do make money a lot of publishers and publishing companies and people that are helping writers do make money. It's a big industry of infinite and people were making money it would not, it would not be so right. So I am, I am kind of on a mission to to change this and to help people who help authors with their writing to help coaches, raise the bar, be more professional, ask for what you're worth realize the value of what you're giving. So I want to talk about this all day long.

Kevin Tumlinson 03:49

Well, you're in luck. We can talk about it for at least 30 minutes. Yeah, no, I, I understand I you know, that's the thing and then the sector of authors I tend to deal with Our incoming. So how do you build a profile? I don't want you to give away the story here. But, you know, how would someone like me who deals with a lot of incoming authors who don't typically have any money? They're not making any money from the books yet. They may have a book yet, right? I'm like where's the starting point of that my my trouble with so I did author coaching for quite a while and charge people money for but I never really managed to make it a viable business because I maybe I was overcharging maybe I was under serving I don't know. So I never, it never took off as a business for me. Now I do it as part of kind of other things.

Jennie Nash 04:41

Right. Right. So I mean, the way that I like to think about it is is this, the, there's this idea with writers that this sort of lottery idea, like I'm gonna roll the dice, and I'm gonna, I'm gonna get picked and I'm going to get picked either by a publisher, an agent and a publisher, I'm going to get picked by readership out in the universe. And the thing behind that is, is that and then I'll leave my day job, right? And then all I'll get a movie deal with Reese Witherspoon and and then you know, like whatever the thing is that that the get picked mentality. And that mentality is so pervasive that writers think that that, you know, I'm just rolling the dice and and it's like they're holding their breath. They're not thinking of their own book and their own career as a viable business. And part of what I do is to help people change that mindset, like what other industry and what other industry which you bring a product into the world and that product could be anything. It could be a podcast, it could be a service industry, it could be, you know, you're growing firms to sell to people for their Fern gardens. I don't know where that came from, but you No, like whatever business nobody starts a business, thinking, I'm just going to get picked and, and like look out of the despair of my day to day job by by selling this thing to people people don't think like that. But with books, they think like that. So part of the mindset is shift is helping them think, okay, like the one of the first questions that I asked him out there is what is your goal with this book? And if their goal with this book is I want to write something to leave a legacy for my kids. And, you know, I don't care if it sells, I don't care if it gets read beyond that. That person's not going to probably make any money off of their work. Right. But if they most people are not going to say that, by the way, if they say, Well, my goal is, you know, if you really can have an honest conversation with them, they're going to state a goal that has something to do with selling books. And so what I talked to them about is then what do you need to invest in? In order to make that come true in order to have a viable business model? What skills do you need? What support do you need? You know, the business that you're in? One of the businesses you're in isn't helping people actually produce their book, you can actually produce a book and not invest money in that in that production. production costs. So the same should be true with writing the book, how are you going to learn how to write a book? How are you going to get the support, you need to do it? How are you going to decide which publishing path to go on? All of those things are investments in that outcome that they're trying to see? Right? And get people to start thinking about their outcome, then you can start talking about the value that you might add to their process. And then that means you have to be really clear about what value you're adding and what you're actually doing for them. Yeah,

Kevin Tumlinson 07:56

yeah, yeah. I agree. I agree. One of the one of the things that always nails me is I have all my little excuses lined up and then somebody comes along and pulls that peg and I can't use any of them.

Jennie Nash 08:15

That's me.

Kevin Tumlinson 08:16

That's exactly what that's supposed to be right. So what is that what author accelerator is about? Like, tell me about author accelerator?

Jennie Nash 08:26

Yes. So I have been training book coaches, I've trained more than 50 book coaches. certifying them and part of that process is teaching them how to manage a Writers Project with a project being the book, how to help that writer, raise the bar of that writer, raise their their own writing standards and skills, make a good publishing choice. The author accelerator is all about the development process. So once you get to the point where you're going to produce the book, you Have to go to somebody like draft to digital or some other person that's going to or entity that's going to help you produce the book. We don't do that. But we help people all the way up to that moment. And so I'm training book coaches, to guide writers and to help writers think about how they're going to make money from their book, if they're going to make money for their book, you know, a huge part of what we do is burst people's bubbles. That if how hard it is to make money at a book, you've got to know that in advance and why you're doing it again, back to the goal of that writer and the goal of that book and, and really making a plan for it. And so I'm helping the coaches help the writers think through that process and think through what they're doing. And we're we do that work in the context of helping them with the writing of the book. I I am Market focus by market focus, it's like, okay, who else is writing a book like you for a book, and it's going to be a book of essays. And it's going to be a book of essays about all the bad boyfriends I've ever had. And there have been 23 of them. So there's gonna be 23 chapters about all the bad boyfriends I've ever had. And I'm going to write these essays about that. The first thing I'm going to say is, are you aware that for an unpublished writer with with no platform to bring out a book of essays is The hardest possible thing in the world to sell. That's the first thing that I would say, right? And they would then then they always come back to me and say something like, but Tina Fey did it, or David Sedaris did it. And it's like, well, Yes, that's correct. But let's look at the hurdles that you might have getting to the marketplace with this book. I'm not trying to get them to write something different. I'm not trying to shoot down their dream, I'm trying to be realistic about it. And, and if they say to me, okay, what how can I ship this so that it might be viable for the marketplace, then we might talk about their structure, we might go look at audiences who are buying books like that we might try to find a way to bring that content to life in such a way that it is viable. So that's what I mean by being market focused. And if I'm going to do that, I I've been in the publishing industry for more than 30 years, I've helped a lot of people come to market. I've seen a lot of books, I'm going to charge for my expertise and my time, I'm not going to help that person out of the goodness of my heart, which sounds super cold and calculating now that I'm going to help that person if they're serious about reaching the marketplace, they're going to have to pay me to get my expertise.

Kevin Tumlinson 12:21

Yeah. And I and again, to draw on your earlier examples. I mean, this is not an unreasonable ask, when it comes to any other business is just for some reason, when it comes to businesses tied to people's dreams. Then all of a sudden, we are cold, heartless, capitalists.

Jennie Nash 12:42

Right. And that's the thing that makes me crazy. And I mean, the other thing it makes me crazy is there are a lot of people out there who are preying on authors, dreams and desires. It's easy to do because you tell an author, I can I can help you publish this book. I am We could do it in 90 days, you could be a best seller on Amazon. And they are all like, here's my money. Right? Well, you know, guess what, I just published a book, my own self. And I put it on Amazon and I literally did nothing, literally nothing other than hit the button. And it came up as the number one new release best seller in whatever category literally not one book sale. And I am I got that little Amazon bestseller flag and the people who are are selling that, like, we have a strategy for your book becoming a best seller on release day and we'll help you with this strategy. And we'll put you through these paces and people pay money for that because they don't know any better. And that makes me crazy, too. So Yeah, same here. There's people that prey on authors desires and dreams and, and I don't think it's right and fair. And so a lot of what I'm trying to do is tell them the truth. This is going to be long. It's going to be hard. And guess what? You're going to have to pay money. Let's talk about what you're going to have to pay to bring this book into the world. And do you want to do that? Right? Yeah.

Kevin Tumlinson 14:11

It's interesting, because I talked to people about this, this concept all the time in these coaching sessions, by the way, the very same ideas, because there is a hesitation among authors to do things like market themselves. Right? And, you know, it's the exact same idea. You know, I've, I wish I could remember the exact quote, I had a guest on the show, several years, a few years ago now, who said that if you are building something that can help people, then it is your responsibility to to market it and in this case, to charge for the service? Like that's part of the responsibility because that's how you continue to keep being able to offer that. Right.

Jennie Nash 14:57

Exactly. And, you know, you mentioned other things Jeez, like if I I mean, here's a perfect example. I'm in my car brand new, by the way, three days old. My car was hit the other day somebody backed into the rumor. I was at a standstill back to the road sucks. So hard. So what do I do? I call my insurance. I get a tow truck. The tow truck guy drives into place. Do I have to pay the tow truck guy? Yes. Because he's, he's saving my bacon from it was raining the cars in the middle of the intersection. So of course, I'm going to pay the tow truck guy. And you know, then we take it to the body shop. You know, it's going to be $4,000 to fix the thing. Like all of those. Those things are things that I need. They're solving a pain point of mine and you don't question for three seconds that you're going to pay that fee because it's you have this point of pain. I can't drive my car. My car's been So we pay when we have points of pain and writers have points of pain, they don't know things, you know things you've been in this you're inside this industry, you know exactly how it works, you hone your skills and your expertise, they come to you the reason you're having these calls is because they need your expertise and they have a pain they want to solve. And so that's how I start trying to talk to my coaches is what particular pain Are you trying to help this writer solve? Is it is it deciding on a publishing path? Is it making decisions about your investment towards that is it that the writing is not strong enough and needs to get better? Is it that you're getting rejected all the time out in the marketplace? And you don't know why is it that your covers bad, you know, there's a lot of pain points along the path and if somebody is helping a writer solve those, the that Pain. They're adding value and should be paid for it just like the total.

Kevin Tumlinson 17:04

No, no, you're you're right, I think is a kind of a supply and demand kind of thing. You know, you can, it's easier to charge someone when they're kind of over a barrel on that tow truck driver, you need this vehicle towed. Now we both know you're going to pay me a little different

Jennie Nash 17:22

thing. That's what's interesting is one of the things that I guide people to do is to choose what pain point they're going to specialize in as a coach, where are they going to help people and, and how are they going to frame that help? Because the writers are going to actually feel the same way as I did with my broken car. You know, if the writers got a book that they're dying to get into the world, they're going to feel that same pain and, you know, we talked at the beginning about how confusing this industry is, if you're outside of it, you know, how do you know what to do? How do you how do you know what to pay? How You know, there's a lot of confusion. So you didn't ask, but if you were to ask me how to convert these calls into paying into paying customers, I would think of these consultation calls as, okay, you're helping them for 30 minutes or an hour or whatever you're offering them and help them with some of their questions. I would think of them as consultation calls to a service. So it's like, this is the way that I could help you. This is how the decision that is in front of you, I'm seeing that you have these choices, and I can help you walk you through those choices and make a good choice. And then I can help you, whatever the next step of the process is. And if you're interested in that, I have a service that we could talk about, you're signing up for. It would be you can still help people out of the goodness of your heart. I do that all day long as well. But, you know, like, the other day, I was talking to a woman Who writes a column for Forbes? magazine, and she wants to write a book. It's her second book. And she she was trying to make a decision about agent or not agent on this on the second book and, and I got on the phone with her and, and had an hour long conversation, I was sending her links I was sending her, you know, information, I was talking about money, I was talking about what it takes to find an agent, how much it would cost her to work on a nonfiction book proposal with somebody like me how much time it would take, I was feeding her information, I was helping her. And it was all in insert in it that my intention was well, this is probably going to shock you but the the service that I would have worked with her on is a $24,000 service. And that would be for a serious professional to get a nonfiction proposal that hopefully will get them a book deal. Yeah. She turned out she she did not take it, she did not go for it. She decided that she didn't want to go for the agent route she that was not for her. She was horrified at the pros and cons when I laid them out of agent versus not agent. she opted out of the service that I was offering. So I spent it an hour using my best brain work to help her to help her decide not to use me. In my mind, that was a good use of time. I helped somebody I helped her come to a good decision. I did good in the world. You know, I did not get the $24,000 client. But guess what next time I might or next time I might and so you know, I think you can combine the helpfulness with the money part.

Kevin Tumlinson 20:50

I think in scenarios like that, you could take that conversation, boil it down to the points that were made. And then you can Create something that could simultaneously educate incoming authors who might have the same question and help you nurture mailing list for example so hundred percent right you could totally turn that into a top of funnel offer

Jennie Nash 21:15

100% and and I have so much free content I have so much amazing resources on on my website people are welcome to come you probably do too. You know, it's it's that push and pull between offering something but not offering everything. Yeah. And I think you're right we we tend in these realms that are about creative pursuits, we tend to diminish the, the value of the expertise and I want to change that.

Kevin Tumlinson 21:47

Yeah, same here. Actually, personally.

Jennie Nash 21:53

Here's what I do with those calls. Just flip your mindset. Just think this is a consultation call personally. That I could offer. I'm going to help them on this call. I'm going to I'm going to be generous and helpful. And I'm going to, instead of giving all the answers away, think more in terms of framing the questions they have to ask. There's questions that you need to answer. Here's the decisions you have to make. Here's a way that I could help you if you wanted to sign up for that service.

Kevin Tumlinson 22:24

Yeah. So does does your program I mean, speaking of markets, does your program kind of arm authors that are the coaches rather with how they would market the service how they reach these authors and you?

Jennie Nash 22:39

Yes, yes, I do. And I studied on my own personally, a lot of marketing people and and tried to adapt the the best practices for book coaching in in my new book, which is called read books all day and get paid for it. Go way into the marketing. And I've had a couple of other top coaches reviewing the book. That's all happening right now because because it's just come out and I had somebody say to me, Jenny's advice on marketing was so spot on. And it made me laugh out loud. So I'm not going to tell you what that is, you'll have to read the book to

Kevin Tumlinson 23:21

see how this works.

Jennie Nash 23:24

I totally help people do it. And here's, here's the key thing. It's not what you probably think it is. It's not take out an ad on this website or go to this conference and print out a bunch of swag or, you know, it's not that really what it amounts to is knowing what you're offering and who you're offering it for. Right. I'm going to totally botch how he says it but Seth Godin and his new book, this is marketing says something along the lines of marketing is about doing something That matters for people who care. That's, that's what I help people do is what are you doing that matters? And who's going to care about that. So if you're somebody who's helping people, at the very beginning of their book idea, going from idea to getting it on the page and helping them frame that the structure of their book, you could specialize in that point in the process and do really well because you'd become known for that part of the process. You could become someone who specializes. I have a coach who wants to specialize in helping lawyers who want to write fiction. There's a lot of lawyers who want to write fiction. Yes, yes. What a cool nice, right. Yeah. To be able to speak to a lawyer to be able to help them translate the way lawyers think and speak and write which is a very particular way to to fiction writing. I have somebody else who wants to help women in speculative fiction, because it's mostly a male dominated genre. So they want to focus on helping women get into speculative fiction. So if you focus on who you're helping, so doing Oh, I think we might have froze. Yeah,

Kevin Tumlinson 25:33

we froze. But we're gonna, can you hear me now? Yes. Okay, we're gonna we're gonna muddle through.

Jennie Nash 25:40

So they say that again.

Kevin Tumlinson 25:42

Yeah, you were to you're just introducing us to the idea of the woman who was helping other women who are speculative fiction, and go, Okay,

Jennie Nash 25:51

okay. I have another coach who's specializing in helping women break into this big speculative fiction genre because it's very male dominated, and her expertise is going to be that. So if she becomes known for that, everybody's going to send those writers to her because that's her. She's helping those people with that particular pain point. So that's what marketing in terms of book coaching is all about is becoming known for doing something really well, that helps people at a place where they really need help.

Kevin Tumlinson 26:24

I think you just hit on something that has always nagged at me, by the way, because there is whenever I have offered author coaching, now, right now, I'm doing it through DVD, you know, we do our consultations, little free consultations, and it's, it's meant to help the people who showed up at our webinars and stuff, so I can't charge folks for that. And I'm not trying to, but when I've tried to add this in the past, there is always that problem of, you know, focus, right. And there's that aphorism that if everyone's your customer, no one's your customer. Yeah, I think what you're saying here is that there's an opportunity if you are willing to focus on a specific aspect of this. So for me, I might I might coach, people in writing thrillers, because that's what I write, or I might coach them in, right in using, you know, I might pick something out there, right? Yeah, just the process of writing. I could do all that. But it's too broad too general. And that's probably one of the reasons why it never quite worked. I wasn't advertising or I wasn't marketing, specifically enough.

Jennie Nash 27:30

Right. So you, you can't make a business on even what you just said. I'm going to help people writing thrillers. Well, what people what kind of thrillers At what point in the process? Have they written a book before? Are they writing their second book? Are they writing a series or do they have a plan to write a book a year like you've got to really narrow down on what writer where they are in the process what they need? Are you helping somebody right faster? Are you helping them right? Like plot out faster. Are you helping them plot better? Are you helping them raise up their writing skills? Are you helping them? Like what exactly are you doing? So there's so many layers to figure out and, and just helping. So if you're on a consulting call with someone, and I'm sure you've been on a million of these calls, people are asking questions about all over the map, right? marketing, about social media about my website about my book cover about the production about the time about the cost about the writing itself about this and that, like that's just scattershot. Yeah, advice, but if you're honing down to really say, I can have your thriller writer, writing your first book, you've never done it before, and you need to make X, Y and Z choices. I can help you do that efficiently, effectively. And, you know, to help you toward your goal. Now I thought a viable business. Yeah, well,

Kevin Tumlinson 28:56

that that is the ideal reader. concept. That's the ideal reader ideal customer concept. And I'm shocked that I never put it together.

Jennie Nash 29:10

One thing because it's what book coaches help writers do, like if I'm working with somebody right now who's writing middle grade fiction, and she's actually a very successful nonfiction writer. And one of the things that I've become known for is helping successful nonfiction writers who want to switch over to not true. I helped her write the book that got the six figure deal for her first novel, excellent. And so I kind of have a specialty in that regard, and I'm helping a woman writing a middle grade story and she She had her story was a hot mess. Okay, so she came to me with a manuscript that just was all over the place. And it had all these characters and all these ideas and all these themes and all this stuff. And you know, it's not going to work. And so part of what I did with her was exactly what we're talking about. Who do you want to reach? Who's your ideal reader? Can't it's not enough to say an 11 year old girl, it's like, an 11 year old girl who reads what and who does what and who's thinking about what and who cares about what and we've really got to hone down on who that 11 year old reader is and what she cares about and what she needs in that book. Otherwise, that book is not going to work. So I, I do this with the writer, and we need to do this with the people helping the writers to is, you know, what are what is your gig? What are you doing to help people? Yeah.

Kevin Tumlinson 30:53

And as That's it, what's funny is here's what you always come back to their sort of universal pieces of advice. that fit no matter what industry you're in. If you're an author, it's no matter what genre you're in. That's this seems to be one of those pieces is to identify the specific reader slash customer you're trying to reach. We are we're at time. So which is unfortunate, because I'm enjoying this quite a bit. And I'm getting a lot out of it personally. Those are always the toughest interviews to end. But I appreciate why don't you back on Now, before I before we drop out of here, I did want to say you have coming up January 20 2020. You have a summit coming up. You want to talk about that for just a second.

Jennie Nash 31:43

I would love to I'm doing a free week of programming about becoming a book coach and I've got 15 killer experts who we have conversations and take you through everything from how to market how to make money, what book coaching really is how it works. And that you can find all the information at author accelerator.com slash summit. So that's author accelerator, comm slash summit. And it's free. It's a week, it's January 20 2020. And I would love to have people come. And if you can't make it, we'll be sending out those recordings so you can grab them after the fact. Very good.

Kevin Tumlinson 32:25

Very cool. All right. I am I think I've signed I think I managed to sign up. So I'm going to check that out and everyone listening to the sound of my voice, you should also check that out. Thank you so much, Jay, for being on. I really appreciate all the wisdom you've dropped on us.

Jennie Nash 32:44

Thanks for having me. All right, everybody. Right now.

Kevin Tumlinson 32:47

You are probably hearing the groovy bridge music and you may dance and place it will and stick around for whatever I'm going to say whatever pithy fun thing I'm sure I came up with Right after this interview and I'll see you all on the other side

Dec 06 2019

44mins

Play

Rank #4: Traditional to Indie with Joe Konrath, Ep 191

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Joe Konrath writes novels in the thriller, mystery, and horror genres. He’s written under the name J.A. Konrath and Jack Kilborn.

READ THE TRANSCRIPT BELOW!

THIS WEEK'S NEWS:

Introducing Scribd Snapshots: A New Way to Discover The Best Nonfiction Books — Scribd Blog - https://blog.scribd.com/home/introducing-scribd-snapshots-a-new-way-to-discover-the-best-nonfiction-books

AAP calls for closer regulation of Amazon and Google - https://www.thebookseller.com/news/aap-calls-closer-regulation-amazon-and-google-1027576

START AN ACORNS ACCOUNT AND GET FREE MONEY!
VISIT KEVINTUMLINSON.COM/ACORNS

DID I MENTION?
Cover your nakedness and your shame with a Written World Tee, now with 100% more Kevin words! http://bit.ly/writtenworld-tees

New to Wordslinger Press, pick up Writing a Better Book Description

Pick up a copy of Kevin Tumlinson's newest Dan Kotler archaeological thriller at https://kevintumlinson.com/books

CONNECT ONLINE:
Website:: www.jakonrath.com
Amazon Author page:: https://www.amazon.com/J.A.-Konrath/e/B000BCH4EM
Twitter Handle:: @JAKonrath
Facebook:: https://www.facebook.com/JAKonrath/

How can listeners join your mailing list?: http://www.jakonrath.com/contact-news.php

--

THIS EPISODE OF THE WORDSLINGER PODCAST IS SPONSORED BY:
Draft2Digital—Convert, publish, and distribute your book worldwide, with support the whole way. https://draft2digital.com/wordslinger

Wordslinger Press—This is your chance to start your indie author career right. Pick up books and other products to help you build and grow a successful writing career. Start growing at http://wordslingerpodcast.com

Support this show: Subscribe and share!

Support us on Patreon: https://patreon.com/wordslingerpodcast

Pick something up to read that will be tough to put down—Archeological Thrillers, Science Fiction, YA Fantasy and more, at https://kevintumlinson.com/books

Jun 28 2019

59mins

Play

Rank #5: Tips for NaNoWriMo and Beyond, Ep. 200

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Kevin shares some tips and advice for not only winning NaNoWriMo but carrying that success forward into a winning writing career!

START AN ACORNS ACCOUNT AND GET FREE MONEY!
VISIT KEVINTUMLINSON.COM/ACORNS

LINKS:

Author Income: How to Make a Living from Your Writing - https://www.writtenwordmedia.com/author-income-how-to-make-a-living-from-your-writing/

--

THIS EPISODE OF THE WORDSLINGER PODCAST IS SPONSORED BY:
Draft2Digital—Convert, publish, and distribute your book worldwide, with support the whole way. https://draft2digital.com/wordslinger

Wordslinger Press—This is your chance to start your indie author career right. Pick up books and other products to help you build and grow a successful writing career. Start growing at http://wordslingerpodcast.com

Support this show: Subscribe and share!

Support us on Patreon: https://patreon.com/wordslingerpodcast

Pick something up to read that will be tough to put down—Archeological Thrillers, Science Fiction, YA Fantasy and more, at https://kevintumlinson.com/books

Oct 31 2019

31mins

Play

Rank #6: WPC-135 - Building author trust with Tim Knox

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Tim Knox is a bestselling author of over a dozen books in the fiction and nonfiction genres, the ghostwriter of over 100 books, editor, author coach, and digital publishing expert. 

CONNECT ONLINE:

Website(s):

http://findabookeditor.com

 - http://timknox.com

 - http://timknoxbooks.com

 - http://entrepreneur-code.com

 - http://interviewingauthors.com

Twitter handle(s): @timknox

Facebook: timknoxbooks

MENTIONS:

Wordslinger Podcast on YouTube: http://bit.ly/WordslingerPodcast

THIS WEEK’S INDIE PUBLISHING NEWS:

Draft2Digital announced that it now distributes to Amazon

Pronoun accounted that it’s closing its doors in January 2018

Brian Meeks is now offering a full-on Amazon Ads for Authors course https://meeks-master-classes.teachable.com/

THIS EPISODE OF THE WORDSLINGER PODCAST IS SPONSORED BY:

Draft2Digital—Convert, publish, and distribute your book worldwide, with support the whole way. https://draft2digital.com/wordslinger

KDP Rocket—Take control, get more readers, increase your Kindle rankings. https://bit.ly/kdpslinger

Support this show: Subscribe and share!

Support us on Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/kevintumlinson

Pick something up to read that will be tough to put down—Archeological Thrillers, Science Fiction, YA Fantasy and more, at https://kevintumlinson.com/books

___

GOT A QUESTION FOR KEVIN AND HIS GUESTS?

CALL 281-809-WORD (9673)

Nov 17 2017

49mins

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Rank #7: WPC-147 - Freewriting with Adam Leeb

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Adam Leeb is the Cofounder of Astrohaus, the makers of the Freewrite Distraction-Free writing tool. He is a product designer and mechanical engineer (MIT graduate)

MENTIONS:
New to Wordslinger Press, pick up Writing a Better Book Description

Pick up a copy of Kevin Tumlinson's newest Dan Kotler archaeological thriller The Girl in the Mayan Tomb https://books2read.com/mayan-tomb

CONNECT ONLINE:

Website(s):
https://getfreewrite.com
wtf.getfreewrite.com
https://astrohaus.com
https://adamleeb.com

Twitter handle(s): @iamadamleeb

THIS WEEK’S INDIE PUBLISHING NEWS:

Bezos Reveals Amazon Prime has 100M Members — In Amazon’s annual shareholder letter, CEO Jeff Bezos gave the typical call for the company to live up to “ever-rising customer expectations,” and touting Amazon’s high standards at every level. The letter also contained some interesting news in the form of information that all the world has wondered about: Just how many subscribers does Amazon Prime have? The number, as it turns out, is 100 million. Meaning Amazon not only makes around $9.9-billion per year on the service, it also has the eyes of a hundred million vetted customers, willing to spend even more money with the retail giant. I’m not sure what to do with this knowledge, now that I have it. But I’m impressed, Jeff. *slow clap* — http://bit.ly/147-Bezos

ALLi is Betting on Blockchain — If you’ve followed news about Bitcoin or any other cryptocurrency, then you may have some vague knowledge of what “bitcoin” and “cryptocurrency” mean. And you might also have heard of Blockchain. The idea, in the simplest terms, is that blockchain is a sort of digital ledger for transactions made with cryptocurrencies, like bitcoin. If that didn’t clear anything up, think of it as a more or less foolproof way to do a digital transaction, much more in line with the way you’d do a physical transaction. In other words, if I pay for your physical book, you get your money and I get the book. I can’t then replicate the book with a few mouse clicks and resell it, keeping the original and maybe repeating the process. Blockchain would effectively prevent anyone from being able to sell a digital version of your book, without at least giving up their digital version. It’s a way to make digital products more like their physical counterparts. And the Alliance of Independent Authors sees this as a great way to give authors a more complete ownership of their intellectual property, allowing authors to have more control, and be less dependent on giants such as Amazon KDP. They’re calling it Self Publishing 3.0, and they’ve released a white paper that gives the full details.  — http://bit.ly/147-blockchain

Amazon Wins First Arbitration — In September 2017 Amazon filed for arbitration against at least five authors and businesses accused of violating Amazon’s terms of service, essentially scamming the system to make quite a bit of money. Amazon has won the first of these arbitrations, against a British business owner. Amazon has asked the court to enter judgement in line with the January award issued by American Arbitration Association. Jake Drya, the UK business owner, is ordered to pay damages after arbitration determined he knowingly manipulated KDP, violating their TOS. Dryan’s business was doing crazy stuff, including publishing duplicates of books that were already available, using bots to increase page views. All of which violates Amazon’s TOS.— http://bit.ly/147-Amazon

THIS EPISODE OF THE WORDSLINGER PODCAST IS SPONSORED BY:

Draft2Digital—Convert, publish, and distribute your book worldwide, with support the whole way. https://draft2digital.com/wordslinger

Wordslinger Press—This is your chance to start your indie author career right. Pick up books and other products to help you build and grow a successful writing career. Start growing at http://wordslingerpodcast.com

Support this show: Subscribe and share!

Support us on Patreon: https://patreon.com/wordslingerpodcast

Pick something up to read that will be tough to put down—Archeological Thrillers, Science Fiction, YA Fantasy and more, at https://kevintumlinson.com/books

___

GOT A QUESTION FOR KEVIN AND HIS GUESTS?

CALL 281-809-WORD (9673)

Apr 20 2018

1hr 5mins

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Rank #8: WPC-136 - Writers on a train with J Thorn

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J. Thorn is a Top 100 Most Popular Author in Horror, Science Fiction, Action & Adventure and Fantasy (Amazon Author Rank). He has published over one million words and has sold more than 170,000 books worldwide. In March of 2014 Thorn held the #5 position in Horror alongside his childhood idols Dean Koontz and Stephen King (at #4 and #2 respectively). He is an official, active member of the Horror Writers Association and a member of the Great Lakes Association of Horror Writers.

CONNECT ONLINE:

Website(s):
http://jthorn.net
http://theauthorcopilot.com/retreat
authorsonatrain.com

Twitter handle(s):
@JThorn_

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/JThornwriter/

Amazon Author page: http://www.amazon.com/J.-Thorn/e/B004ZVF3MK/

THIS WEEK’S INDIE PUBLISHING NEWS:

Goodreads will now charge for its giveaways program, making it harder for readers to discover indie books - the Amazon-owned service announced that it will begin charging authors and publishers for what was once a free service, the ability to create and manage contests to give away free books to readers. Authors can now expect to pay between $119 and $599 for the service. It remains to be seen whether authors will actually use it, or will instead go and use BookFunnel.com to do it better anyway. https://www.theverge.com/2017/11/29/16714972/goodreads-giveaways-program-changing-standard-premium-tiers-authors
Amazon is launching yet another new imprint, this time focused on the Kindle Singles store. Amazon Original Stories will release short fiction and nonfiction works that can be read in a single sitting. These will be free to Prime and KU subscribers, and otherwise cost $1.99 per download. I personally love this idea, particularly for essay writing. https://www.publishersweekly.com/pw/by-topic/digital/content-and-e-books/article/75489-amazon-publishing-launches-new-imprint.html
Nick Thacker is making soundtracks for authors. His new service, Sonata and Scribe, aims to provide original, orchestrated musical soundtracks for indie authors to use as part of their marketing and promotion, or even as an additional revenue stream. He’s making a few tracks for me right now, and they sound amazing.Check out SontaAndScribe.com http://sonataandscribe.com
THIS EPISODE OF THE WORDSLINGER PODCAST IS SPONSORED BY:

Draft2Digital—Convert, publish, and distribute your book worldwide, with support the whole way. https://draft2digital.com/wordslinger

KDP Rocket—Take control, get more readers, increase your Kindle rankings. https://bit.ly/kdpslinger

Support this show: Subscribe and share!

Support us on Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/kevintumlinson

Pick something up to read that will be tough to put down—Archeological Thrillers, Science Fiction, YA Fantasy and more, at https://kevintumlinson.com/books

___

GOT A QUESTION FOR KEVIN AND HIS GUESTS?

CALL 281-809-WORD (9673)

Dec 08 2017

49mins

Play

Rank #9: The Art of the Ask, Ep 193

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Surely you can’t just ask for what you want? Kevin begs to differ. If you’ve been struggling to find a way to market your books on a shoestring or no-string budget, you’ll want to tune in to this episode for some first-step author marketing advice.

TRANSCRIPT AVAILABLE BELOW

THIS WEEK'S NEWS:

Introducing Scribd Snapshots: A New Way to Discover The Best Nonfiction Books — Scribd Blog - https://blog.scribd.com/home/introducing-scribd-snapshots-a-new-way-to-discover-the-best-nonfiction-books

AAP calls for closer regulation of Amazon and Google - https://www.thebookseller.com/news/aap-calls-closer-regulation-amazon-and-google-1027576

START AN ACORNS ACCOUNT AND GET FREE MONEY!
VISIT KEVINTUMLINSON.COM/ACORNS

DID I MENTION?
Cover your nakedness and your shame with a Written World Tee, now with 100% more Kevin words! http://bit.ly/writtenworld-tees

New to Wordslinger Press, pick up Writing a Better Book Description

Pick up a copy of Kevin Tumlinson's newest Dan Kotler archaeological thriller at https://kevintumlinson.com/books
--

THIS EPISODE OF THE WORDSLINGER PODCAST IS SPONSORED BY:
Draft2Digital—Convert, publish, and distribute your book worldwide, with support the whole way. https://draft2digital.com/wordslinger

Wordslinger Press—This is your chance to start your indie author career right. Pick up books and other products to help you build and grow a successful writing career. Start growing at http://wordslingerpodcast.com

Support this show: Subscribe and share!

Support us on Patreon: https://patreon.com/wordslingerpodcast

Pick something up to read that will be tough to put down—Archeological Thrillers, Science Fiction, YA Fantasy and more, at https://kevintumlinson.com/books

TRANSCRIPT

WANT TO HELP IMPROVE THESE TRANSCRIPTS? REACH OUT

Kevin Tumlinson: 00:00 Hey slingers, this is another week of the Wordslinger Podcast. And one you're not gonna want to miss. Stick around and find I, you can get what you want just by asking for it. Hey, you looking for a jump on your own India author career. Yeah.

Kevin Tumlinson: 00:14 Kind of confused about where to start. I got the place for you. Check out draft two digital. That's where you're going to be able to convert your manuscript, distributed worldwide, online, and get help. The hallway from the best author support there is. Trust me on this one. So go check out drafted digital@drafteddigital.com slash word slinger.

Announcer: 00:37 It's the Wordslinger Podcast where story matters. Build your brand, write your book, redefine who you are. It's all about the story here. What's yours? Now here's the guy who invented pants, optional Kevin Tumlinson, the Wordslinger.

Kevin Tumlinson: 01:02 Well, I am Kevin Tumlinson, the Wordsligner. Uh, you

Kevin Tumlinson: 01:05 are whoever you are the person listening to this broadcast. Uh, so I'm, uh, I'm in the middle, so you may have noticed I didn't, uh, do an episode last week. Um, and I gotta tell Ya, it's, it's probably going to be tough to get episodes out over the next couple of months. I got, I got conferences coming up August. I, I, I literally have a conference every week of August. Um, and, uh, lots, a lot of travel. It's a lot of trying to work everything out. I'm gonna do my best. I'm gonna do my absolute best to, uh, to get you at least one episode a week in there. It might just be a bunch of Solo slinger episodes. Um, and I'm sorry to the folks who I have interviewed that I'm trying to, I'm trying to get through that bad catalog as fast as possible, and I got more interviews coming up.

Kevin Tumlinson: 01:57 So, uh, but you know, this is crunch time, uh, for me in this, in this business with, um, basically it's conference season. So, um, I'm gonna do my best though, and I'm looking out for you. Uh, and speaking of that, uh, you know, we've done a couple of webinars now or while we've done one webinar so far for a draft to digital, the d to do d to d a You a as we call it, ask us anything. Uh, the first one went really well and we set up a bunch of, uh, author consultations. Now, unfortunately, I didn't check a box, uh, that needed to be checked in order to evenly distribute the consultations. So for two weeks, two, three weeks now I have, um, I've basically had back to back consultations with authors with no gap between, uh, and no lunch breaks and none of that.

Kevin Tumlinson: 02:49 So it's been a very rough couple of weeks. Uh, plus we've had some other, I've had some other things going on here, like a whole family thing happened. Um, so it's been challenging to get everything done and that includes getting the Wordslinger Podcast recorded. Um, but I'm here, I'm back at least today. Um, but one of the things that's come up in the author consultations that I thought would make a great topic, uh, it's a very basic marketing technique or marketing, um, strategy that I think gets overlooked all the time. Now, everyone I talked to, uh, asks marketing questions, they're always very focused on, you know, Facebook ads, uh, Amazon Ams ads, that sort of thing. You know, how do I handle I up my game and get people to buy my book wide or, you know, uh, just discover me and get on my mailing list. And the one thing that I've discovered that, that hardly anyone does is just ask for what they want.

Kevin Tumlinson: 03:53 So if you have a mailing list, now, a lot of the VA, a lot of the authors I've talked to at all, you know, they only have like maybe a hundred people, some only have like 20 people on their list. Uh, some have 1500. It is, it's, it doesn't really matter what the size of the list is. But one of the things you should be doing regularly is engaging that readership with personable emails, which we've talked about in the past. When you want to become a human being to these people, you don't have to share personal, private details of your life, but you want to, uh, frame yourself as someone that they can, that they might enjoy knowing. You know, as someone you're having a conversation with. Um, and in these emails you should periodically ask them to share the, the links to get your free book or short story or whatever you're using to get people on your mailing list.

Kevin Tumlinson: 04:47 Um, if you're not offering something, some top of funnel offer or incentive for authors to get on your mailing list, you need to come up with something. Um, I just talked to an author just now. I won't, I won't reveal who she was. I, she's, she's a little shy, but uh, she has a free novella. I have no a prequel. It wasn't an Avella cause it was like 75,000 words. So it was a full on book. She'll give that book away for free. She sells it, but she also gives it away for free. If you get on her mailing list a, but she created this a bonus content that was a, uh, sort of a like almost like, uh, an espionage case study kind of thing. Um, and uh, she offered that as a sort of, I'm sorry to her list for not having emailed him for a bit.

Kevin Tumlinson: 05:35 And I, I told her to, to package that and offer that as an incentive for people to just get on the list in the first place. That's a great resource. So if you, if you could pull together a little things like that, just content people can't get anywhere else. Exclusive content for being on your mailing list that is attractive to a lot of readers. And, uh, it's also going to pull in the kind of readers that you want, the readers who are interested in this, this topic that you cover. You know, whatever your genre happens to be, um, who are willing to take an action, uh, which makes them much more likely to take the action of buying a book when you have one to promote to them. Now, um, email your list regularly, once a month at least. Um, and tell them it's perfectly okay with you if they share the links to get the free downloads.

Kevin Tumlinson: 06:33 Say, ah, look, I am trying to reach as many readers as possible. You know, this is my dream. You can help me achieve my dream. If you share this link with everyone you know, everyone you think would be interested in reading, um, my kind of books and uh, and just do that every now and then. This is a, this should become a, a regular part of your author diet. Uh, you are going to go out and ask your readership and your platform to share, um, ways to get on your mailing list. The mailing list is where the money's at. It always will be. I'm convinced of this. It always has been for sure. So you want to nurture the mailing list before you try anything else. If you're, if you want to advertise and you're not making a lot of sales, I would advise you to advertise Facebook ads or otherwise.

Kevin Tumlinson: 07:30 Um, well the focus on growing your mailing list rather than focusing on sales. Now Amazon's a little different. Uh, ams, the, you know, it's all internal. Um, I have my own opinions about Amazon ads, um, and uh, sort of the toll to play an idea. But um, you can do the same thing on Amazon ads. You can have a book that is, uh, geared towards, you know, for example, this author is pretty cool. This book is actually geared towards enticing people to get interested in the rest of her series. Um, I would heavily laden that with, um, you know, calls to action to get on her mailing list. Definitely a CTA to read through in the next book in the series. Definitely want that. But I would make sure that the call to action to get on the mailing list is front and center and then the Freebie that they get at that point should be like that bonus material or something that they can't get anywhere else.

Kevin Tumlinson: 08:30 Cause what you don't want is for the author or for the readers to feel cheated to find out that they could have gotten this book. They just spent, you know, a couple of bucks on for free if they had gotten on your mailing list. So instead you're advertising this prequel or the first book in your series or whatever. Uh, definitely trying to promote, read through, but also trying, pushing, uh, to get people on your mailing list. Once they're on your mailing list, you get a whole lot of other options. Uh, you nurture that list in, you'll go far. So, um, so that is part of this ask. Um, you should also ask, asking is always this to me, it's a magical tool. Ask your readers how things are going, how are the, how, how are you liking the books? Take that feedback and learn from it.

Kevin Tumlinson: 09:28 So if someone says to you, you know, I like the books, but there's a lot of typos. All right, well there's an area to focus on. You got to get better at editing. I like your books with the covers stink or I like your books. I really love the covers. You might get some positive feedback out of this, which is always good and always motivational. Um, and then, uh, ask you can ask them what you know for ideas. You can say, I'm trying to get more people to uh, to check out my books at the library. Right? Does anyone know any librarians I can talk to? Does anyone know any programs I can be involved in? Um, and you may be able to find this stuff with a Google search, but if you find this stuff through the people you're engaging with it, there's a bond that happens.

Kevin Tumlinson: 10:17 So don't be afraid to ask your platform, um, to help you out and frame it that way. You can say, now you're, you should always focus on trying to give more than you get when it comes to your platform. And I'm using platform to encompass emails, social media conferences, you attend, whatever. But uh, you want to try to give more than you receive, right? So give out some free bonus stuff. Give out, you know, make sure you are engaging your, your email list with, uh, tales from wherever. If you're not personally comfortable sharing personal information, then share things about what you're reading, share trips that you're taking chair or not. You don't have to give people insight information about you're going to be out of town during such and such date. But you can come back and share photos, share history that you've learned. If you're a romance writer, share a, you know, funny romantic comedies that you've watched.

Kevin Tumlinson: 11:17 Um, you want to share, share, share. You want to get these people to start thinking of you as a friend that they are willing to help. And then you periodically a, asked them to share with as many people as they can. Your link to get a download or whatever. Or, um, you're linked to by a renew, a preorder or buy a new release or something along those lines. And, and be, um, you asked them to buy this, softens that ask, ah, it's not a hard sell if you spent three months prepping to make it right or to even ask for it. Um, so there's an underlying philosophy here. It's something that it's part of, it's one of my sort of principles, right? That, um, you never get anything you'd [inaudible] you're going to, everything you get you have to ask for in one way or another, right?

Kevin Tumlinson: 12:16 Even if you didn't intend to ask for it. So the phrase my grandfather used to use is, I never got to think, I didn't ask for, even if it was a punch in the mouth, which I always took to mean, you know, you, you get, you ask for everything you get out of life in one way or another, your reap what you sell, right? If you got punched in the mouth, you probably set that up somehow, even if you didn't sing or do anything to deserve it. You put yourself in these scenario somehow. Right? Um, and maybe that's not true. Maybe someone just randomly ran up and clocked you in the jaw. It, it's been known to happen. Uh, this is not victim blaming. This is personal responsibility, right? This is you deciding you're empowered rather than deciding everything has to happen to you. You, you are deciding, I am make things happen. When you think like that and you're willing to ask for what you want, you increase the odds of getting it.

Speaker 4: 13:15 Yeah.

Kevin Tumlinson: 13:15 So you may not get it every time, right? You may not actually get what you asked for. You may ask for something and you don't get exactly what you asked for. Uh, but maybe it comes close or maybe it goes off in a different direction and you decide you didn't want that anyway. You know, maybe you could change your mind, but getting used to and getting comfortable with asking, uh, will carry you much further. This is part of a whole bootstrapping idea by the way, that you can use this to promote yourself without having spend money. So that right there should make your ears perk up. So, uh,

Speaker 4: 13:56 okay.

Kevin Tumlinson: 13:56 There's a couple of concepts at play here and we talk about this often, but your first priority should be to build up your platform as much as possible. Your platform can be defined as, as your reach to a willing audience that that has a higher, that has higher odds of actually going out and purchasing your books. That's going to be your platform. Your mailing list is the biggest component of that platform. The more people you can get on your mailing list, who are sympathetic to you, who are vetted, uh, the better. So your goal there is you want to build a mailing list of people who, uh, who like the type of thing you write and are willing to part with money for it.

Speaker 4: 14:38 Yeah.

Kevin Tumlinson: 14:38 Which, you know, seems pretty basic and no brainer. And yet nobody, nobody, I'm not going to say that. A lot of authors don't think about it and they don't do what it takes to make happen. Um, so this is all kind of a mindset thing. I'll be honest, it's, it's all, it's all kind of go out and own your author career, right. Be empowered and empowered. People ask for what they want. The idea is to ask, ask, ask and play the numbers game increase your odds every time you ask your odds go up. Right? So that's what marketing is. Marketing is all about increasing the odds that the right person will find your book at the right time and make a purchase. That's what marketing is. Some people spend money to increase those odds. Some people don't. Some people do a mix of both. Um, I do a mix of both.

Kevin Tumlinson: 15:37 Uh, but for the largest portion of my career I had, I only did free promotion stuff cause I only had $0 million to spin. So it's not impossible to market your work without money. It's not impossible at all. You, you don't need a budget to market. Uh, but money is uh, in a nice, interesting little reciprocal relationship with time. You are either going to spend time or you are going to spend money. Money is a shortcut. Money means you don't have to spend as much time and you can actually amplify your time with money. But that doesn't make it the end all be all of my marketing resources. That would be, um, your creativity. You know, because even if you have a budget, let's say that you've got $1,000 extra a month, you know, you sell cans or you or blood or, or you have a book income of thousand dollars or you, um, mow lawns on top of your regular job or something, right?

Kevin Tumlinson: 16:40 You've just, somehow each month you've cobbled together an extra thousand a month that you can throw into an advertising or rather a PR I, um, marketing budget, I don't want to call it an advertising budget, cause advertising isn't always the right answer. Advertising can be the right answer, but it comes down to how are you going to spend that thousand dollars? What, how do you, how can you most efficiently spend that thousand dollars? And let's just say it's not $1,000. So let's say the best you're able to do each month is an extra hundred dollars. How do you spend it? Well, you know, you can't go do, um, in an elaborate Facebook ad campaign for 100 bucks a month. You can run Facebook ads for 100 bucks a month and you might even see some traction, but it, it, you need to assess, um, how best to apply those funds. If Facebook advertising is going to be the way to go, chances are you're going to need to figure out, um, the best way to funnel traffic from those ads into something that you can use.

Kevin Tumlinson: 17:44 I would argue that at that point, the lower your budget, uh, the important it is to focus entirely on your mailing list. And I think that's just, that's just marketing life right there. In fact, with us, we, let's just engrave that in stone. The lower your budget, the more important it is to focus entirely on growing your mailing list rather than on direct sales. Because you can sell to that list over time. Once you have those people captured, you don't have to spend any more money to, to engage with them necessarily. I mean there are, there is some overhead in, you know, the email management systems, lots of tools out there to explore, to help keep the cost down. But in general, if you have a mailing list, you're not going to spend a ton of money, uh, to be able to remain in contact with them.

Kevin Tumlinson: 18:38 Um, but you control that list, you control that group. I mean, if it came down to it, I don't advise this, but you could export that list and import it into a special Gmail account and email those people on blind. See, you know, blind copy, right? There's always going to be a way, I'm not always an advisable way, but at least there is a way, right? So, um, that's the, that's our new one of our new commandments. Well, maybe one day, I should write all these down actually, but that's one of our new commandments. This is lower your budget. The more your focus should be on building your mailing list, uh, and asking that list to help promote you to others is how you grow that list beyond having you spend money, right? So if you can only spend 100 bucks a month and you're focusing all, all of it on getting a couple of people on your mailing list here and there, then I'm asking them to go off and be advocates on your behalf.

Kevin Tumlinson: 19:39 It's, that's the fastest way to grow without a bunch of overhead. It's a little bit like network marketing that I don't know if anybody in the audience has ever had this experience. I got approached by tons of people who did network marketing, Amway and things like that. I'm not saying I'm not going to pass any judgments on this. Uh, this practice. There are a lot of millionaires out there who built their millions through network marketing. So Kudos to you. Um, it was never quite my bag. However, the principle of it is pretty sound from a marketing perspective. Uh, I just think we take a different, more heartfelt approach than going out and blind recruiting, you know, hundreds of people to do our bidding and be in our, our downline or whatever they call it. Um, and here's how that would work. So you get, you get your readers to download your Freebie, you get on your mailing list and, and maybe they've even gone off and bought a book or two from you.

Kevin Tumlinson: 20:43 And if you only have one book, you know, maybe they've bought your book, now you've, uh, you've enticed them to get on your mailing list, you've somewhat vetted them. And if you asked them to go off and share with just, you know, could you just go share with, say, I would always say everyone, you know, but even if it's just two people, if you could just get two people to sign up and get this Freebie, think of two people you like who might like it and enjoy this book or this bonus content or this short story and tell them, give them this link. You can share this email with them. And that's really when you want your emails to be on point, by the way. You want your emails to be, um, focused on, uh, being personable, engaging, asking questions, open loops. We call it, you want people to respond, right?

Kevin Tumlinson: 21:36 Uh, but if you, I'm telling you, as you get people on your mailing list, people are, are really kind of wonderful if you ask for help and you frame it that way. Hey, I need your help. Okay, I need a favor. If that favor doesn't cost them any money, then there's a bigger chance that they're going to go ahead and do it. Uh, there's a book and I'm gonna pop over into a web browser real quick and try to remember what the, I know that the title is influence. Um, but I can't remember the author's name right now, so let me look that up. But you want to, you want to get your hands on this book, uh, influence science and practice. Is that it? No, the psychology of persuasion influence the psychology of persuasion. Uh, this is a written by Robert B and I think it's chill, chill, chill.

Kevin Tumlinson: 22:31 Deany CIA, l. D. I. N I, um, pick up this book. Read this book, get it on any book. Get it on audible. Uh, wherever you like to, uh, consume your books. Uh, this is a, this is a good one. This is this, there are a lot of ideas in here that are very applicable to authors. One of the ideas was, um, people respond to and ask if you give them a reason, if you say, because, right? So, uh, I think, and I'm, I'm, I may butcher this, this example. So if you read the book and I'm completely off base, forgive me, it's been a bit, um, but they did a test with, um, people in line to use a copier and someone comes along and says, do you mind? Could I get, could I cut in front of you and use the, the copier because I have 10,000 copies to make or I have 10 copies to make.

Kevin Tumlinson: 23:30 That's probably closer to what they actually said. Um, so what they found was when people did this and they gave a reason, no matter what that reason was, it, it increased the odds that the person would let them cut. So when you say to someone, um, would you mind sharing this email with everyone? You know, because I'm trying to build up my readership and it would really help me out. Okay. So now they get to be a hero. You're asking them to help you fulfill your dreams. I would even frame it that way if you wanted. I have a dream of being an author. This is the only thing I really want to do with my life. I love writing. I love, I'm so happy that you enjoy my books. Would you help me find new readers by sharing this with as many people as you can think of?

Kevin Tumlinson: 24:24 Thank you so much. I'm so very grateful. And so now you're, you're coming to them hat in hand asking them to help you. You've got to get past the ego. But on this, by the way, don't think of this as begging or, or, or anything like that. Asking for charity. Uh, these people agreed to get on your mailing list because they were interested in what you had to say. They're interested in your book. They were interested in your Freebie. They voluntarily got on this list. You asking them to help grow. That list is not charity. It's just to, you know, two people interacting. We do this. The social contract allows us to do this all the time in our personal relationships. Stop thinking of your list as being a bunch of customers and start thinking of them as a bunch of friends of yours and your life is going to change for the better. I promise you start treating everybody on that list like, like you are so thrilled that they're there because you should be everyone on that list. They're more than just numbers. They're more than just the dollars. They represent their living, breathing human beings who care about you and showed it by getting on your list. Nelson, are there deadbeats on lists? Yes. Are there people who aren't going to respond positively no matter what you say or do? Yes. They're not your audience.

Kevin Tumlinson: 25:49 They're welcome to leave that list. You have a special club that, uh, that this group belongs to and you want to treat them like that and remind them of it all the time. You are a, you are in and the exclusive, a company of, of wonderful human beings. And, uh, I am so happy you're here. I am your guide in this, in this, uh, community. Uh, but I, you know, I am a also a servant and if you could help me by spreading this around, you would make my dreams come true. People will respond very positively. Um, and the same thing can happen outside of your mailing list. It can happen on your social media, social media circles. But an interesting thing happens on social media. Uh, there's a kind of, uh, it's a little bit like high school. Like if you to say to your friends in high school, I could really use help in math.

Kevin Tumlinson: 26:48 Uh, if you went to your friends individually and said that they, they would help you. But if you said that to your group of friends who are all equally trying to impress each other and build their own audiences and, or cliques, uh, you know, and promote themselves at the same time, chances are instead of being helpful and kind, they're going to be cruel and, and hurtful. They're going to make jokes, they're going to make light of it. Or even if they don't go to that extreme [inaudible] sorry about that. Hold on and to clear my throat. Um, even if they don't go to that extreme, they may just rib you and make fun of you a little out of kindness, you know, out of love, quote unquote. Um, just because a, they don't want to openly commit to anything cause they may get approached by others to do it or whatever. So it's the fact that they can be seen when you ask them. I think so you want to ask them more privately in, in an email newsletter is private. It feels like they're getting an email directly from you. So, uh, you can still ask for this stuff with social media and you'll oftentimes you will, you will get some help. But in my experience, it's much better to, uh, to approach your list. One second.

Kevin Tumlinson: 28:11 I absolutely hate putting little gaps in there, but when my throat dries out and what can I do, I could edit, not going to do it. Um, anyway, we're coming up on time. Uh, just a couple minutes left. I, uh, I hope that this has been useful to you. Um, this is how I approach everything. And honestly, it's, it's worked so well for me. I, I don't spend much in advertising. Now. I have some promotions coming up that I do. I have spent money on. I have a $2,500 promotion coming up. Um, you know, August. Uh, I spend money on ads, you know, from time to time, not, not a lot, but then, you know, I spend money on BookBub's and I spend money on, uh, the various different, uh, uh, promotion tools. Um, and I, but I do it sort of sparingly and I do it experimentally.

Kevin Tumlinson: 29:09 And, uh, I think I can say without a doubt that I get more traction out of, uh, out of this, this type of thing out of asking the more organic way of doing this. And it's more stable. It grows better over time. It does take more time. So don't, don't think this is an overnight kind of thing. Uh, but you can spend tons of money on ads and never see the needle move for sales. I would spend that money. I'd focus. If I were you and I did this, I would focus entirely on a, I'd focus a hundred percent of my efforts on building my list up and then only promoting to my list. Cause if you can get 50,000 people on your list, you know, and they all buy a book, that's great.

Kevin Tumlinson: 30:00 So anyway, uh, that's going to do it for this week. I hope you got something out of it. I hope I'm able to give you an episode Friday, but just in case I'm not a, just be aware I'm doing conference stuff. So, uh, reach out if you want to. God bless and I'll see you next time. Hey, how are you doing on money? I know it's a touchy subject, but, uh, I got some that may help you out. See, I'm using an app called acorns and it helps me manage some investing. Uh, put some money back, get a little interest. It's Kinda nice to watch my money grow. So I want to share that with you. Go to kevintumlinson.com/acorns and you'll get some free money. See you there.

Jul 17 2019

31mins

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Rank #10: Amazon Ads with Bryan Cohen, Ep. 201

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It’s a Wordslinger three-peat with author, speaker, and podcast host, Bryan Cohen! Kevin and Bryan chat about Amazon ads and more in this don’t-miss episode!

START AN ACORNS ACCOUNT AND GET FREE MONEY!VISIT KEVINTUMLINSON.COM/ACORNS

LINKS:

Author Income: How to Make a Living from Your Writing - https://www.writtenwordmedia.com/author-income-how-to-make-a-living-from-your-writing/

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THIS EPISODE OF THE WORDSLINGER PODCAST IS SPONSORED BY:Draft2Digital—Convert, publish, and distribute your book worldwide, with support the whole way. https://draft2digital.com/wordslinger

Wordslinger Press—This is your chance to start your indie author career right. Pick up books and other products to help you build and grow a successful writing career. Start growing at http://wordslingerpodcast.com

Support this show: Subscribe and share!

Support us on Patreon: https://patreon.com/wordslingerpodcast

Pick something up to read that will be tough to put down—Archeological Thrillers, Science Fiction, YA Fantasy and more, at https://kevintumlinson.com/books

Nov 29 2019

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Rank #11: WPC-171 - Short fiction with Dylan Powell

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William Dylan Powell is an award-winning author who writes crime stories, mystery fiction and books about Texas. He lives in Houston. Powell's work has been featured in Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine, Alfred Hitchcock's Mystery Magazine, the Best American Mysteries 2018 and a host of fine truck stop bathroom walls across the Texas badlands.

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Cover your nakedness and your shame with a Written World Tee, now with 100% more Kevin words! http://bit.ly/writtenworld-tees

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Pick up a copy of Kevin Tumlinson's newest Dan Kotler archaeological thriller at https://kevintumlinson.com/books

CONNECT ONLINE:
Website:: www.texasmischief.com

Amazon Author page:: https://www.amazon.com/William-Dylan-Powell/e/B001JP89AI

Twitter Handle:: @texasmischief

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THIS EPISODE OF THE WORDSLINGER PODCAST IS SPONSORED BY:
Draft2Digital—Convert, publish, and distribute your book worldwide, with support the whole way. https://draft2digital.com/wordslinger

Wordslinger Press—This is your chance to start your indie author career right. Pick up books and other products to help you build and grow a successful writing career. Start growing at http://wordslingerpodcast.com

Support this show: Subscribe and share!

Support us on Patreon: https://patreon.com/wordslingerpodcast

Pick something up to read that will be tough to put down—Archeological Thrillers, Science Fiction, YA Fantasy and more, at https://kevintumlinson.com/books

Feb 08 2019

1hr 11mins

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Rank #12: WPC-149 - Fantasy Writing Career with Michelle Madow

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Michelle Madow is a USA Today bestselling author of fast paced fantasy novels that will leave you turning the pages wanting more! She grew up in Maryland and now lives in Florida. Some of her favorite things are: reading, traveling, pizza, time travel, Broadway musicals, and spending time with friends and family. Someday, she hopes to travel the world for a year on a cruise ship.

CONNECT ONLINE:

Website(s): www.michellemadow.com

Twitter handle(s): @MichelleMadow

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/michellemadow/

Amazon Author page: https://www.amazon.com/Michelle-Madow/e/B005GA8KA6/

THIS WEEK’S INDIE PUBLISHING NEWS:

Don’t Get Cocky — Romance author Faleena Hopkins has been the talk of the indie publishing industry of late, thanks to her decision to trademark the word “cocky” as it applies to romance-genre ebooks, books, audiobooks, and allegedly even metadata for all of the above. Hopkins began sending cease and desist notifications to authors using the word in their romance titles, threatening legal action if authors didn’t comply and make a change. Hopkins has trademarked not only the word “cocky,” but a stylized font treatment of the word using a font that is, apparently, not legally allowed for use in a trademark or copyright. The community is up-at-arms over the move, and it has sparked a very heated discussion regarding intellectual property laws as they apply to indie authors. My take: This is an abuse of IP law, and it should never have passed review. Someone in the US Patent and Trademark Office has fallen down on the job, or has been banned for access to a common English language dictionary. This is a story to watch for all its implications to the industry, for sure. — http://bit.ly/149-cocky

Books by women authors are cheaper than books by men? — That, according to CBS Money Watch, reporting on research that books written by women are priced 45 percent lower than books written by men. Researchers analyzed more than 2 million books published between 2002 and 2012 and determined the 45 percent number to apply to both traditional and indie-published books. That number shrinks to just 9 recent once genre and other mitigating factors are included. And the number specific to self-published titles is smaller still: “Self-published titles by women are priced at 4 percent less than for men, the researchers found,” as stated by the CBS article. So what’s driving that price differential? I argue that it’s genre: Women tend to write in genres where various factors have driven the price point lower. Whereas men tend to write in genres where a higher price point is acceptable. The way to look at this and verify it would be to break this down and study price points and ranges within specific genres, to see if the disparity holds up. — http://bit.ly/149-gender

Author takes on US Education — Ted Dintersmith, author of “What School Could Be,” appeared on CNBC to discuss his book and his take on how the education system in the United States is not only letting students down, but is actually making it more difficult for them to be competitive in the workplace. Dintermsith states that he believes college “definitely is not for everyone,” and points out that only one in five students leave college with a background and resources that can equip them for a successful career. I have to say, I agree 100%. As controversial as this statement may be, I believe college is a worthless endeavor for the majority of our population, and that most people if not all people would benefit far more by investing all of that time, money, and energy into starting a small business—even if that business utterly fails. What do you think? Check out the interview and leave me a comment. — bit.ly/149-school

THIS EPISODE OF THE WORDSLINGER PODCAST IS SPONSORED BY:

Written World Writer’s Retreat - Rent a writer’s retreat that goes wherever you want to go. Check out my listing on Outdoorsy for the perfect writer’s retreat—my 38’ luxury motor coach! Go to http://bit.ly/rvwriter for details.

Draft2Digital—Convert, publish, and distribute your book worldwide, with support the whole way. https://draft2digital.com/wordslinger

Wordslinger Press—This is your chance to start your indie author career right. Pick up books and other products to help you build and grow a successful writing career. Start growing at http://wordslingerpodcast.com

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Pick something up to read that will be tough to put down—Archeological Thrillers, Science Fiction, YA Fantasy and more, at https://kevintumlinson.com/books

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May 11 2018

1hr 8mins

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Rank #13: WPC-134 - A fit writing career with Dale Roberts

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Subscribe to the Wordslinger Podcast on YouTube! Visit http://bit.ly/WordslingerPodcast

DALE ROBERTS
AUTHOR AND YOUTUBE CONTENT CREATOR

Dale L. Roberts is an accomplished self-published author, former personal trainer and YouTube content creator. While he loves to read and write, Dale’s greatest passions include spending time with his wife and cat, watching wrestling and making funny videos.

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Website(s):
http://dalelroberts.com
http://SelfPublishingWithDale.com

Twitter handle(s): @selfpubwithdale

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/selfpublishingwithdalelroberts/

Amazon Author page (if applicable): https://www.amazon.com/-/e/B00KUAL3NS

MENTIONS:

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Nov 10 2017

1hr 2mins

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Rank #14: WPC-168 - Your Career as Writing Inspiration with George Mercer

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For more than three decades George Mercer worked as a national park warden in Canada, including both east and west coasts, the North and the Rocky Mountains. For eight of those years, George worked as a Park Warden and Monitoring Ecologist in Gulf Islands National Park Reserve, British Columbia. George continues to be passionate about parks and protected areas, weaving elements of mystery and suspense into Dyed In The Green, the first fiction series about Canada’s iconic national parks.

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Cover your nakedness and your shame with a Written World Tee, now with 100% more Kevin words! http://bit.ly/writtenworld-tees

New to Wordslinger Press, pick up Writing a Better Book Description

Pick up a copy of Kevin Tumlinson's newest Dan Kotler archaeological thriller The Girl in the Mayan Tomb - https://books2read.com/mayan-tomb

CONNECT ONLINE:
Website:: www.georgemercer.com
Amazon Author page:: https://www.amazon.com/George-Mercer/e/B01M5L55F3
Twitter Handle:: @egeorgemercer
Facebook:: https://www.facebook.com/george.mercer.12

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THIS EPISODE OF THE WORDSLINGER PODCAST IS SPONSORED BY:
Draft2Digital—Convert, publish, and distribute your book worldwide, with support the whole way. https://draft2digital.com/wordslinger

Wordslinger Press—This is your chance to start your indie author career right. Pick up books and other products to help you build and grow a successful writing career. Start growing at http://wordslingerpodcast.com

Support this show: Subscribe and share!

Support us on Patreon: https://patreon.com/wordslingerpodcast

Pick something up to read that will be tough to put down—Archeological Thrillers, Science Fiction, YA Fantasy and more, at https://kevintumlinson.com/books

Jan 18 2019

57mins

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Rank #15: WPC-139 - Werecats in a No-Werewolf Zone with Mark Engels

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Boyhood interests in trains and electronics fostered Mark's career as an electrical engineer, designing and commissioning signal and communications systems for railroads and rail transit agencies across the United States. Along the way Mark indulged his writing desire by authoring articles for rail and transit industry trade magazines. Coupled with Mark's long-time membership in anime, manga and anthropomorphic fandoms, he took up writing genre fiction. Growing up in Michigan, never far from his beloved Great Lakes, Mark and his wife today make their home in Wisconsin with their son and a dog who naps beside him as he writes.  He is a member of Allied Authors of Wisconsin and the Furry Writers' Guild.
CONNECT ONLINE:

Website(s): https://www.mark-engels.com/

Twitter handle(s): @mj_engels  

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mark.engels.39

Amazon Author page: https://www.amazon.com/Mark-J.-Engels/e/B074Q51T9R/


THIS WEEK’S INDIE PUBLISHING NEWS:

Author Earnings Report is out - Data Guy is back after a year-long hiatus, and he does not disappoint. The latest Author Earnings Report gives us some incredible insights into the industry, including a final confirmation that ebooks are, in fact, not going away. According to the report, 55% of online book purchase in 2017 were ebooks, and there’s every indication that climb will continue. The report has generated a bit of controversy, however, as it had initially named certain authors and publishers, giving their sales ranking and other information. Some authors complained this was a breech of privacy. What do you think? Does it impact privacy to aggregate and report publicly available data?  http://authorearnings.com/report/january-2018-report-us-online-book-sales-q2-q4-2017/
Google Play now offers audiobooks. — Google Play has had a turbulent time trying to enter and keep a foothold in the content marketplace, with it’s Google Play Store being difficult to navigate and, largely, devoid of content beyond what you could find at an airport bookstore. As they continue to work on those challenges, it looks like they’re making a bid to go toe to toe with Audible and iTunes for the audiobook market. This week, Google announced it will start carrying audiobooks in the Google Play Store, specifying that there is no subscription, and that many popular books will be sold at a discount. Could this be a true contender for knocking Audible off of the hill, giving both consumers and authors a better shot? I’d love to hear what you think, in the comments. https://www.theverge.com/2018/1/23/16921176/audiobooks-google-play-android-ios-home-speakers
Apple takes another swing at Amazon over ebooks. — After a slap-down from the U.S. Department of Justice, back in 2012, Apple was forced to back off of some of its more aggressive plans for the ebook business. Now, they’re up for another run, with a revamped ebook store and mobile app, and a new name—switching from the familiar iBooks to simply “Books,” in a move that mirrors similar name changes across their product line. It’s good to see someone rise to take a swing at Amazon, who has dominated ebooks for years now, but it remains to be seen whether we’re all in better hands within Apple’s walled garden. How do you see this battle of the book giants turning out? Is it a turning point for the industry, or just more of the same? https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-01-25/apple-is-said-to-ready-revamped-e-books-push-against-amazon
THIS EPISODE OF THE WORDSLINGER PODCAST IS SPONSORED BY:

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Pick something up to read that will be tough to put down—Archeological Thrillers, Science Fiction, YA Fantasy and more, at https://kevintumlinson.com/books

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Jan 26 2018

52mins

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Rank #16: WPC-137 - Taking Risks with Joe and Kait Russo

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Joe & Kait Russo are full-time travelers, living in a travel van with their husky, Leo, as they travel the country to see what adventures they can find. Their popular YouTube channel, We're the Russos, informs thousands of would-be travelers about the ins, outs, and in-betweens of life on the road.

CONNECT ONLINE:

Website(s):
https://weretherussos.com/ youtube.com/weretherussos

Twitter handle(s): @weretherussos 

Facebook: facebook.com/weretherussos

Amazon Author page: https://www.amazon.com/Joe-Russo/e/B0756TCVKC

THIS WEEK’S INDIE PUBLISHING NEWS:

Smashwords hasn’t been hacked, but you might be — Smashwords, aka the “other” eBook aggregator service, sent an announcement to users stating that they’ve noted attempts to hack the service. In an email to users, Smashwords stated, “The security team here at Smashwords has detected multiple attempts by cybercriminals attempting to log in to Smashwords author accounts using stolen email/password combinations…To date, we’re aware of two authors who were victimized. Working with our payments partner PayPal we managed to recover the funds for one author earlier today and will continue pressing them to do the same for the other.” The service assured users that they had not been hacked but they encourage Smashwords users to change their passwords to something secure and strong, right away. So how about you? Does this vulnerability impact you at all?  https://goodereader.com/blog/indie-author-news/smashwords-was-not-hacked-but-change-your-password
SFWA joins Author’s Guild and others to speak out about Open Library. The Internet Archive is back in the news again, as author groups speak out about alleged copyright infringement, thanks in large part to its Open Library initiative. The service was intended to be a sort of virtual library, where readers could check out works by various authors, and check them back in without retaining copies for themselves. Internet Archive holds to a somewhat sketchy position that if one has purchased the rights to a copy of the book, one is legally allowed to lend that book to others. What makes this tricky is, they’re right. Sort of. But the legality surrounding electronically transmitted copyrighted properties is still in a primordial ooze, with a lot of questions still to be answered. Many author groups, including SFWA and the Author’s Guild, see this as infringement, while some see it as functionally no different than services such as OverDrive, which allows libraries to purchase a license to distribute a book, and to distribute it in essentially the exact way Open Library is doing it. The key difference—Open Library is scanning legally purchased print books, as well as purchasing ebooks, to create its offering. So is this infringement? Is it violating copyright? Tell me in the comments.  http://www.sfwa.org/2018/01/infringement-alert/
Could Mickey Mouse become public domain? Probably not, but Steamboat Willie, the first Mickey Mouse cartoon, is set to enter the public domain in 2024. This comes two decades after Disney and other entertainment industry giants successfully lobbied to have copyright extended by 20 years, even for work that had already been created. This was a blow to intellectual property law, which is essentially meant to encourage new and original works. Oddly, at the moment no one is pushing any legislation to extended these rights further, meaning properties created in 1923 and beyond will start entering public domain soon. And here, a happy time can be had by all, as artists, writers, filmmakers, and other creatives gain access to a wealth of old content they can bend, fold, mutilate, and remix into new content. Does this breathe life into past work, or perpetuate the entertainment industry’s habit of falling back to cultivated ground, rather than pushing ahead into new frontiers? You tell me, in the comments.  https://boingboing.net/2018/01/08/sonny-bono-is-dead.html
THIS EPISODE OF THE WORDSLINGER PODCAST IS SPONSORED BY:

Draft2Digital—Convert, publish, and distribute your book worldwide, with support the whole way. https://draft2digital.com/wordslinger

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Support this show: Subscribe and share!

Support us on Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/kevintumlinson

Pick something up to read that will be tough to put down—Archeological Thrillers, Science Fiction, YA Fantasy and more, at https://kevintumlinson.com/books

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Jan 12 2018

1hr 9mins

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Rank #17: Boosting your book's Discoverability with Reedsy Founder Ricardo Fayet

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Ricardo Fayet is one of the founders of Reedsy, an online marketplace connecting authors with the world's very best publishing talent (think editors, cover designers, book marketers, etc.). A digital marketing enthusiast, he also helps authors find their audience and is now busy growing Reedsy Discovery. https://reedsy.com/discovery

NOTE: Register before March 31, 2019 and use coupon code WORDSLINGER at checkout to save $10!

DID I MENTION?Cover your nakedness and your shame with a Written World Tee, now with 100% more Kevin words! http://bit.ly/writtenworld-tees

New to Wordslinger Press, pick up Writing a Better Book Description

Pick up a copy of Kevin Tumlinson's newest Dan Kotler archaeological thriller at https://kevintumlinson.com/books

CONNECT ONLINE:Website:: https://reedsy.com/discovery

NOTE: Register before March 31, 2019 and use coupon code WORDSLINGER at checkout to save $10!

Twitter Handle:: RicardoFayet

YouTube Channel:: https://www.youtube.com/c/reedsy

How can listeners join your mailing list?: By signing up to Reedsy Discovery: https://reedsy.com/discovery

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THIS EPISODE OF THE WORDSLINGER PODCAST IS SPONSORED BY:Draft2Digital—Convert, publish, and distribute your book worldwide, with support the whole way. https://draft2digital.com/wordslinger

Wordslinger Press—This is your chance to start your indie author career right. Pick up books and other products to help you build and grow a successful writing career. Start growing at http://wordslingerpodcast.com

Support this show: Subscribe and share!

Support us on Patreon: https://patreon.com/wordslingerpodcast

Pick something up to read that will be tough to put down—Archeological Thrillers, Science Fiction, YA Fantasy and more, at https://kevintumlinson.com/books

Mar 08 2019

1hr 3mins

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Rank #18: WPC-152 - Writing like a boss with Ben Hale

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As an avid snowboarder from Utah, Ben grew up with a passion for learning. This thirst for knowledge led him to sports, music, and academic endeavours. He has done volunteer work in Brazil and speaks three languages. With a bachelors from the University of Central Florida, he started publishing in 2012 and has since sold over 200,000 copies. Each of his books have been inspired by his wife and six beautiful children. He currently resides in Missouri while completing his Master's in professional writing.

MENTIONS:

Rent a writer's retreat that can take you places! Check out my RV, now for rent via Outdoorsy, at bit.ly/rvwriter!

Cover your nakedness and your shame with a Written World Tee, now with 100% more Kevin words! http://bit.ly/writtenworld-tees

New to Wordslinger Press, pick up Writing a Better Book Description

Pick up a copy of Kevin Tumlinson's newest Dan Kotler archaeological thriller The Girl in the Mayan Tomb - https://books2read.com/mayan-tomb

CONNECT ONLINE:

Website(s):

www.Lumineia.com

www.27dates.com

Twitter handle(s):

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Facebook: Facebook.com/Elseerian, Facebook.com/27dates

Amazon Author Page: https://www.amazon.com/default/e/B008L4V466

THIS WEEK’S INDIE PUBLISHING NEWS

Brought to you byDraft2Digital

VELLUM ADDS EASIER IMPORT FROM SCRIVENER

http://bit.ly/152-vellum

THE AUTHOR'S GUILD IS TAKING IT'S ANNUAL AUTHOR INCOME SURVEY

http://bit.ly/152-income

AMAZON NOW LETS AUTHORS PURCHASE MULTIPLE COPIES OF KINDLE EBOOKS

http://bit.ly/152-amazon

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THIS EPISODE OF THE WORDSLINGER PODCAST IS SPONSORED BY:

Written World Writer’s Retreat - Rent a writer’s retreat that goes wherever you want to go. Check out my listing on Outdoorsy for the perfect writer’s retreat—my 38’ luxury motor coach! Go to http://bit.ly/rvwriter for details.

Draft2Digital—Convert, publish, and distribute your book worldwide, with support the whole way. https://draft2digital.com/wordslinger

Wordslinger Press—This is your chance to start your indie author career right. Pick up books and other products to help you build and grow a successful writing career. Start growing at http://wordslingerpodcast.com

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Pick something up to read that will be tough to put down—Archeological Thrillers, Science Fiction, YA Fantasy and more, at https://kevintumlinson.com/books

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Jun 24 2018

1hr 7mins

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Rank #19: What is the minimum you need for a writing career? Ep 184

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What does it take to write a book? The bare minimum comes down to "the tool that lets you write." In this episode, Kevin talks about some of his experiences with writing using only the resources he had on hand, including a few found items.

NEW! Read the full transcript below!

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Cover your nakedness and your shame with a Written World Tee, now with 100% more Kevin words! http://bit.ly/writtenworld-tees

New to Wordslinger Press, pick up Writing a Better Book Description

Pick up a copy of Kevin Tumlinson's newest Dan Kotler archaeological thriller at https://kevintumlinson.com/books

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THIS EPISODE OF THE WORDSLINGER PODCAST IS SPONSORED BY:
Draft2Digital—Convert, publish, and distribute your book worldwide, with support the whole way. https://draft2digital.com/wordslinger

Wordslinger Press—This is your chance to start your indie author career right. Pick up books and other products to help you build and grow a successful writing career. Start growing at http://wordslingerpodcast.com

Support this show: Subscribe and share!

Support us on Patreon: https://patreon.com/wordslingerpodcast

Pick something up to read that will be tough to put down—Archeological Thrillers, Science Fiction, YA Fantasy and more, at https://kevintumlinson.com/books

TRANSCRIPT

Kevin Tumlinson: 00:00 Hey slingers, welcome back to another Wordslinger Wednesday. Uh, we're gonna jump right into a whole bunch of ideas that I've been kicking around about the basics of what you need to get started in this business. So stick around. We'll talk about that next.

Announcer: 00:19 It's the word slinger podcast. Where's story matters? Build your brand, right, your book. Redefine who you are. It's all about this story here. What's yours? Now here's the guy who invented pants, optional. Kevin Tumlinson, The Wordslinger.

Singer: 00:41 Wordslinger!

Kevin Tumlinson: 00:44 Well, I am Kevin Tumlinson, the Wordslinger. Thank you for tuning into another Wordslinger Wednesday. Uh, I guess that's what we're going to call this. It's the, it's a Wednesday episode of the Wordslinger podcast. And if you are tuning in and expecting to hear a guest interview, uh, I am very sorry, but, uh, that's not what we do here. At least not on Wednesdays, not on this particular style of episode. If you've been tuning in for the past couple of weeks, you've, you've probably discovered that I am a, I've been splitting up the episodes between interviews and a, this little word, uh, afterword word, wisdom, whatever you want to call it. Uh, so I've kind of been experimenting with the format a little is what we're, what we're saying here. So right now, um, I'm experimenting even further. Actually I'm a tinkering with a, this is, this is going to be an audio only podcast today.

Kevin Tumlinson: 01:42 So if you have become accustomed to being able to find this on Youtube, actually you're probably not listening at all right now because I'm not gonna, I'm not going to do a video. And there's a couple of reasons for that. One. Um, I got incredibly frustrated today as I recorded this episode once already and then everything fell apart and I was unable to a series of, uh, freakish instances. How are you Siri? That's hilarious. Uh, a series of really things like that just happened, technical glitches, goofy things that happened, uh, caused it to not just not work. And there just comes a point where I start to question what the value, I'm not seeing a lot of subscriptions on Youtube. It's just not for this, this format doesn't work on Youtube is what I've determined or maybe it does and I'm not doing it right.

Kevin Tumlinson: 02:44 Yeah, there could be all kinds of things, but I am, I've decided to sort of fall back on my strength. I'm may very well not do any video episodes. Um, going forward. The frank truth is I was just recording myself doing this show this way. Anyway, so there you have it. Um, so that, but that is not what today's Wordslinger Wednesday or Wednesday word is about taking what vote. Hey, tell me what you think I should call this. Um, this, this part, this type of episode I'm leaning towards, I'm leaning towards a couple of things, but I'd love to hear what you have to say. Pop on over towards, on your podcast.com hit the contact button or leave this in the show notes of this episode. [inaudible] and just tell me what you think. Um, I should call the shelf at a couple people chime in. Um, and, uh, Eh, yeah, I think, I think I got a general direction. So anyway, so this, this week, this Wednesday I wanted to talk to you about something that's, that's Kinda been, it's come up a couple times. I had a whole conversation with Roland in Zelle a few days ago, uh, that, that was sort of on it kind of went to this place. Um, but the, uh, and I'm sorry, I keep clearing my throat and ear. I'll try to hit the mute button like this.

Kevin Tumlinson: 04:07 That way you don't hear me cough in your ear. Um, anyway, I had this conversation and it's something I've been thinking about for awhile. I've been trying to kind of pull together a blog post on this topic. It's actually a little tougher than you might think to, uh, discuss this topic because I don't want to oversimplify it and I don't want to overcomplicate it. So I'm trying to find the medium, middle ground here, but the idea is what are, what is the absolute minimum you need to, uh, to have a author career? Um, now what I've decided for this episode at least is to focus just on the writing portion of this. So the minimum you would need to actually write and publish your book. Um, so none, there's none. There is no component for marketing in this. There's no advice on, um, you know, uh, anything other than anything beyond sort of the mechanics of actually writing.

Kevin Tumlinson: 05:05 And so, uh, that's going to simplify this just a little and then a, in a future episode, if you are particularly if you're interested in this, um, I'll expand on this topic, but so to tell you, uh, to kind of get you into the right head space here, uh, the conversation I had with, uh, Roland involved, um, this idea of authors sort of constantly being on the lookout for a, a, an all in one solution for everything that they need. So they want something that, that helps them, uh, you know, map out the book, plot the book, uh, build the characters, build the settings, uh, you know, write the scenes, tag the scenes, uh, organize everything into chapters. Uh, do all the editing, fine, all the grammar. And the other issues as, yeah. And then, you know, reorganize the book, spin it out as a, um, uh, well an ebook in whatever format they want, uh, and or published that Ebook to all the various storefronts.

Kevin Tumlinson: 06:09 And you know, the reality is that that's becoming much closer to a reality. It's becoming more real a that something like that could exist. Uh, specifically we were talking about an APP that is making the rounds, but uh, this, all of that stuff could apply to scrivener, which is my writing tool of choice. But what, what kind of came out of this was some, some thinking about, you know, isn't necessarily the best plan in the world to have an all in one tool. I mean, it can be, it depends on the tool. Um, but let's just talk about Scrivener for a second. I love Scrivener and Scrivener was the, the sort of break-over tool for me because for one, I'd spent most of my career writing a copy for clients and an employee in employers and for myself, uh, in Microsoft word. So the word is the, it's the tool of choice for no matter what industry you're in, if you're going to create written words on a page, Microsoft word is going to come into play at some point in that process.

Kevin Tumlinson: 07:20 Uh, you can't work in any professional industry in this, on this planet without word, uh, factoring in somewhere. So word was, uh, my first choice when it came to, you know, writing my books. Now I had written books and I had written other than lots of things in a tools outside of Word, uh, especially in the years before Word existed. And yeah, that I am that old. Um, but eh, you know, word became the tool of choice. And so I, you know, that's what I fell back on. So for me, um, Scrivener represented a way to write in a new fun environment if you'll permit that. Um, that wasn't word. So what was happening for me was I was spending, you know, eight, 10, 12 hours a day writing copy in Microsoft word and then a stop and buy a coffee shop on my way home from an office or something.

Kevin Tumlinson: 08:18 And putting another couple of hours in, in Microsoft Word, and it just felt like more work. It took the soul out of me. Uh, I didn't feel creative anymore. I felt, you know, drained of energy. I felt like here I am slugging away one, you know, two more hours out of my day, four more hours out of my day spent in this wretched software. You know, and I actually like word quite a bit. It's the most powerful writing software to my knowledge. I mean, I, I've used practically everything and this is the word is really robust, uh, sometimes too much. So, um, but Scrivener represented to a whole new way of thinking about my writing. It was nonlinear. It allowed me to, uh, uh, write in scenes and within chapters, just like files within a folder, reorganize all that stuff. Funny to this scene would be work better in chapter three than it does in chapter 10.

Kevin Tumlinson: 09:10 Uh, this chapter would make a better chapter seven, then chapter three, a. So I'm able to reorganize on the fly if I want or, uh, after the book is done, I can retool it and restructure it and uh, that's great. I also liked the cork board. That was probably the first thing that attracted me to Scrivener was the stupid cork board, which I don't even use now. But I had a, I had come in after an era of, uh, doing a whole lot of, uh, screenwriting for documentary mostly and uh, to keep all the stuff organized. I used an actual cork board with, um, through three by five note cards. So being able to do that virtually was comfortable. So that was one of the first things that attracted me to scrivener. Uh, also it has a story and that it was created by an author.

Kevin Tumlinson: 10:09 That's always a hook for me. I'm going to get into that in a future episode. But, um, anyway, so Scrivener was a tool that, that was comfortable and fun for you use. Now here's the deal. Scrivener for the longest time, uh, was only available, I believe it was only available on a Mac. And so, but then it became available on PC, uh, but it wasn't as good for a long time. I think now they've solved a lot of these problems and then eventually it wasn't available on Ios where I really wanted it. So there were times where even Scrivener was kind of frustrating to me and I branched out and tried other things, tried Ulysses, which I really did like. Uh, and then they went to a paid model and I didn't like that. Uh, among other things, there was also a couple of other factors in me switching away from Ulysses.

Kevin Tumlinson: 10:56 Um, but there's, you know, there's been a lot of those little apps, so I've been thinking about this for awhile now. What is the, um, ultimately, you know, what does it come down to when you are, uh, when you're looking at the, uh, what it takes to do this work? Does it take a scrivener? Does it take a Microsoft word? You know, these are, these are software platforms that are actually quite expensive. Um, so you don't necessarily want to drop a bunch of cash to get into this when you don't know if you're going to succeed. Um, and you know, granted, most people can afford some something, you know, they can't afford one of these apps. Scrivener's like 40 bucks. So, um, I say that so cavalier, but not everybody has 40 bucks through it. Something like this. So bare minimum though, let's just face facts.

Kevin Tumlinson: 11:52 There is that old method of sitting down with a pad and Pencil and scribbling out your book in Longhand. I still know authors who do this, you know, I know plenty of authors who do it. Uh, it's sort of almost shocking to me that there are that many people who write their books long hand and my hand cramps up just thinking about it, but there, but there is some appeal in that for me. I've written longhand short stories, articles, all kinds of things. I carry around a mole skin notebook pretty frequently. I've got lots and lots of journals all around me. Uh, so there's been plenty of writing that way in my life. Um, and that is one way to go. And in fact I have a story. So, um, a couple of years ago I was just sort of thinking, pondering the nature of being a writer and the accessibility of it.

Kevin Tumlinson: 12:46 Um, and I decided I would, I would do a little experiment. I like to keep my eyes open. I like to keep my eyes open for resources. I'm, I'm a very resource oriented guy. Okay. So I thought, well I'm a resource wearing a guy. I'm always looking for like where was the last time I saw a coat hanger or a screwdriver or something in case I've locked myself out of a car or you know, I need to fix something or whatever. And I keep that stuff in my head, a sort of a little, a buffer of that stuff. So I thought, well, I'm going to start looking for the materials. I would need to have a writing career. Just, just, I just spent like a couple of days doing this. Like I'm just going wherever I go, I'm to look around and say, okay, I could use that. I could use that.

Kevin Tumlinson: 13:30 I do this as a matter of course anyway. Um, I'm always kind of keeping my eyes open in case there's a, you know, in case I need a, that, that rock or that brick or that, uh, you know, uh, whatever. And this is how I find a lot of money by the way. So keeping my eyes open for things that would help me. Right. I took one of my regular morning walks, I'm going, I'm heading for I a doughnut shop actually, where I tend to sit and do a little bit of reading and writing. Uh, not anymore. I don't live anywhere near this place. Um, and oddly enough, I don't think I ever bought a donut from this place, but while walking through another parking lot to get there, I spotted someone had dropped a ballpoint pen like that, the writing and implement, I will pick that up.

Kevin Tumlinson: 14:22 And uh, I went ahead and pick that up and then I get to the, uh, the donut shop in order my coffee and they'd give me a receipt. And they, for some reason they gave me this super long receipt, not a lot on it. And it was, uh, the backside of it was entirely blank. So, uh, I'm thought, well, there are some paper, I have a pin, I'm going to write something. So I, I spent a few minutes writing out, uh, basically something that became the front end of a blog post. Um, and uh, you know, I handled, I had a good time with this. I mean, I, this is a kind of fun exercise, right? Yeah. I thought, well, okay, so that's handwritten. Now how would I get that to a digital world now I had my phone with me, so of course I could sit there and type it in, you know, bit by bit on my phone.

Kevin Tumlinson: 15:10 I thought, you know, that's kind of cheating. I brought that with me. Uh, if I didn't have that with me, how would I do this? Now that the answer there is, it wasn't an immediate thing with my phone. I could immediately publish. I can instantly publish. I got another story about that coming up. But without the phone. I had to think of some other way, you know, if I were, if I were just completely broke and they only means I had was this, you know, this pan I found on the ground and any scrap of paper I could pick up, how would I go about turning that into a writing business? Um, and the answer for me, uh, on this particular trip was, um, once the sun was up, once the world was active and moving, I, uh, walked to a local library was very close to where I was once I was in the library.

Kevin Tumlinson: 16:05 Uh, they had several computers that I could sit at for free. And, uh, once you're sitting in a computer to get all kinds of options, now I wanted to publish this, right? So I, I used, um, uh, Google docs, you know, which is a free office, Microsoft office level tool. And I typed up what I'd written in and I kind of finished it and you know, and then I did the copy and paste and I could have easily done used anything else. I was, since I was blogging this, I could've just written in the blog platform, there are a million free blog platforms. Um, so that may not, like I went from finding a penalty ground and using a receipt to sitting down in front of your computer and publishing what I'd written and it didn't cost me anything more than the cup of coffee I'd paid for.

Kevin Tumlinson: 16:55 And I could easily have skipped that and just written this on, uh, any scrap of paper and I didn't even need the pen or the paper really could have just gotten to the library and sat down and started writing. So, um, now that's a blog post, but the same thing applies. Google docs, for example, will let you spit out that, uh, your work as a word document or an RTF file. Guess who uses that? You can actually upload that to, um, draft to digital, convert your manuscript that you've created into a, in a pub and a Mobi file, a distributed worldwide right from there. Um, and, uh, start making some money on this thing that you, you know, wrote wall front of abusing opinion out in the parking lot, or skip the pen and then just go straight in and write your, uh, your and Google docs.

Kevin Tumlinson: 17:50 Um, uh, fast forward now. I went to a conference in Orlando. You've heard this story before if you've listened to the show for awhile, but I was in a conference in Orlando and had some time between conferences. I had multiple conferences going on and a couple of days and decided I would go do Disney world. Actually, I basically had one day, like one day and decided I'm going to go to Disney world today. So I went to Disney world, had a great time, didn't want to take care of a bunch of crap with me. So I had my phone and that was it. Um, so I am, uh, standing in line for the flight of passage ride, which is the, if you go to animal kingdom, they have a whole avatar world. For some reason Disney owns avatar. Now for some reason, despite this movie being, you know, forever old and only one movie and wasn't even all that great, they have an entire section of a park in Disney world dedicated to it.

Kevin Tumlinson: 18:53 And I have to admit the park itself is much cooler than the movie. Um, so I'm waiting for this ride. It's a three hour wait. So I took my phone out and I had recently had a conversation with Michael LaRonn. Now you can benefit from that conversation cause uh, I did an interview with him on this topic later. Um, and he told me, and you could find that go towards in your podcast at comp type Michael LaRonn, L. A. R. O. N. N. Um, he told me that he'd started writing all of his books using his iPhone and typing using his thumbs on the screen. And that blew my freaking mind. So I wanted to play with this. So I started doing a lot of stuff on my phone. I started writing blog posts, I started writing copy, um, marketing copy for draft to digital. And I decided, well, what if I applied this to fiction?

Kevin Tumlinson: 19:50 So I started while whiteness line, I wrote a little short story using nothing but the iPhone and my thumbs right went much faster than than you would think. It actually went very well. Um, but from that phone I was able to, uh, you know, I wrote it in Scrivener, I was able to output that as a word document, uh, to a Dropbox. I was able to upload that word document too. Um, drafted digital and from draft to digital I could convert it to all the a ebook formats and a I went on a Canva and use their little free ebook cover thing and made a cover for it, uh, complete with an original image and everything. And then I wrote the description and I wrote all the metadata stuff and uh, you know, chose the title and ha got it all pulled together and I got all the way to the point where I could've pushed publish and stop there because I wanted to go back and edit, maybe expand, do some other things with this story.

Kevin Tumlinson: 20:49 So the point there was in that three hours, three hour window of standing in line, because I was by myself, I didn't have anybody to talk to. Everybody had their loved ones and family with them. Everybody's laughing and having a good time and I'm feeling a little lonely. So I write a short story and made me feel much better. And uh, and by the time it was all done, I could have pressed, pressed publish on that and put it out into the world where it could have started making me some money. And so I would have turned that, that waiting time into writing time, uh, all that took was a smart phone. So I love that idea because years ago I used to write using a palm pilot and if you don't, if you're not old enough to remember these, the personal digital assistants, PDAs, they were the precursor of the iPhone.

Kevin Tumlinson: 21:43 Most of you, I think it probably lived through that era. But, uh, I had a palm five, which was a fairly fancy palm pilot and I had a little keyboard for it. I even at one point had a little digital, a laser generated keyboard, laser projected keyboard. It would project the keys onto a table top surface and I could type that way. Uh, that didn't work, all that great. So I didn't use it much, but I did have a little, a little thing that the, that the PDA snapped into the palm pilot snapped into then how to keyboard. It was a great keyboard. I really wished I could get one like it for my iPhone. Um, cause it all folded up is perfect. But man, I, I mean I love the idea of a folding keyboard. I've got like a dozen of them and I still can't find one.

Kevin Tumlinson: 22:32 That's that I really love. Uh, but I was able to, uh, you know, wherever I was, I, this was, I had laptops but they weren't very battery efficient. Uh, and, and this was small and portable and I carried it in my pocket. So wherever I was, I could stop and do some, some writing. And I wrote lots of articles, blog and I, this was pre blog. No one knew what a blog was, but I was, I was basically, you know, writing a blog, um, uh, sort of web journal and, um, you know, I did a lot of short stories, things like that. And it was all mobile. Well that, that thing is just like there's a little monochromatic screen and doesn't even have Internet access. It's just, it was just an organizer basically. But it gave me this tool and that shaped a lot of how I do my work now.

Kevin Tumlinson: 23:21 Um, but the idea is to look around, uh, the, the bare minimum that you need for this as a, as a pad and pencil. You need to be able to get this stuff online these days. Uh, but even that is kind of, you know, it's kind of Iffy, like you don't necessarily have to publish online. Um, there are ways to go about this where you never touched the internet at all, but I, uh, I don't know why are you the efficiency of that? But the real point here is you can create a career from almost literally nothing. It just takes, you know, looking around and figuring out how do I get my words on the page. Um, now we've talked about writing, Eh, uh, as in sitting down with a pad and pencil or sitting down with the keyboard. Um, but it's equally as effective to go ahead and just dictate what your writing.

Kevin Tumlinson: 24:21 Um, I read Kevin j Anderson's book, I think it was like the millionaire writer or something. Hold on just a second. I'm to take a little sip of water. Hold on. Mm hmm. That is lubricating. Um, he wrote a Kevin J. Anderson, he was talking about one of his favorite things to do, which is to, um, to go hiking on the trails near his home in Colorado. And while he's doing that, he carries a little voice recorder with him. He dictates his books as he goes. Now. That's fantastic. I've never really gotten into that, but I could see how it would work. And I was talking to actually Roland Denzel about that very idea. He likes to use dragon. Um, and he has a PC and a, you know, I never got into the whole dragon thing. Uh, you know, I kind of played with it when they first introduced it years ago and I played with, I played with a few times since.

Kevin Tumlinson: 25:20 Uh, I just don't feel all that comfortable, especially sitting in front of my computer. I'm dictating. It just doesn't work as well for me. It's not the same vibe from me. However, I could see how I'm doing it on the go, walking and talking. Uh, I think that might work well for me now to do that. You could use a voice recorder or you could use your mobile phone. Um, now if you're using a text to our speech to text software, things can get a little tricky. Um, but uh, but there are ways to make that work. Uh, but you know, I, I like, um, I don't use this yet for narrating a book, but I've used a service called Timmy, which is spelled t e m i.com. It is a service that will, it uses the same sort of software basically that will translate your, your words into text automatically and a cost you about six, $6 an hour, about 10 cents a minute actually.

Kevin Tumlinson: 26:23 So, um, I've played around with it a little. I was going to use it for our transcriptions for the show. Uh, it's not perfect, especially when you've got more than one voice recorded, so you have to, you will have to do some editing. But, uh, if you don't, if you have a Mac and therefore can't get the dragon software, uh, or if you don't like, you know, dealing with that, that sort of thing, uh, this is another option so you can, so you don't even have to be able to type or write, you know, physically right to write a book. You can just narrate it. Now, one of the advantages then is if you do it right, um, you could even have your audio book, uh, sort of prerecorded. I don't see how you could do that really, uh, fresh without editing, but, uh, you know, stranger things have happened.

Kevin Tumlinson: 27:13 Um, but it does give you kind of used to the idea of reading your work out loud and if you're going to do that, you, you very well could record your own audio books. You could get really good at this stuff. So the point there is a, there are no real limitations here. Um, and if there are limitations, you know, they're usually extenuating circumstances and you can, you, you can find a way to work around those. Uh, what it takes is looking around seeing what resources you have and putting those resources to work. I've had people tell me I could never ride on my cell phone, even with a keyboard. Know I love my Bluetooth keyboard with my phone. I love to write that way. Um, cause it's hyper portable, you know, I mean I can be anywhere. Um, but I've had people tell me I could never ride on the phone and the screen's too small.

Kevin Tumlinson: 28:04 I'm blown away by that very statement. Given that I used to have a word processor that a little strip of monochromatic LCD screen and that I basically could see about half a sentence at a time. And I wrote entire books on that word processor. So to tell me that they phoned screen is too small. Um, you know, I think it's just a matter of adjusting, Eh, the point is there is a way, and you might have to compromise a little on what you think it means to be a writer, but you can get this done. So the bare minimum, the bare minimum to right is a, to find a tool that works for you in that means it works for you, physically, works for you in terms of your budget works for you in terms of productivity. Uh, but it's out there. You do not have to spend a lot of money on software of any kind apps of any kind equipment of any kind.

Kevin Tumlinson: 29:03 You know, there are some people who buy a Mac so that they can use scrivener and vellum, you know, um, Scrivener's available in pcs, like I said, but you know, vellum isn't, um, you know, you the, I applaud you, um, if you've got the budget to do that, do it. I do. So I do. Um, but maybe you don't, uh, I went to the flea market this past weekend and I saw hundreds of small laptops and the, and large laptops that people were selling for like less than 25 bucks. Some were selling for more. Uh, but a lot of, a lot of these were working laptops that people were, sounded like $25, not the latest and greatest. Of course you might have to reformat them. You know, I, there will be some blemishes on them, you know, uh, it, so you can, you can do this. I mean, am I first laptop came from the flea market.

Kevin Tumlinson: 29:58 I paid $20 for it. It was a monochromatic green screen, Tandy laptop, clamshell laptop. This is the first laptop I owned, you know, so, um, the point there is there are more resources out there and then you're probably aware of or that you're thinking about. And it doesn't take that much to actually do this. So, uh, and I ran you through a whole process of getting that, you know, book onto, um, you know, into distribution using drafted digital. I'm biased towards draft to digital, but, uh, you know, there are a lot of other ways to do this too. So that's it. That's the basics. That's all it takes. And I know you can do it. Uh, cause I've seen, you know, a few thousand of you do it. You're not, if you are still struggling to write your first book, um, then you know, I just want you to know there are no real barriers and if you are already writing, um, and you're thinking about, you know, you maybe you feel a little inadequate.

Kevin Tumlinson: 30:57 I don't have a Mac. Maybe they should do virtual Mac pay, pay a monthly fee so I can use vellum. Uh, you know, maybe I should, uh, save up and buy a new Mac book pro or whatever. Um, it's fine if you do that, but it's not necessary. And that's the point I'm trying to make. So, uh, I'm at time, a little over an hour, so I'm going to go ahead and wrap this up. Uh, if you have questions about this or anything else, please hop on over to words on your podcast.com. Let me know what you're thinking. Ah, let me know you think of this and this format and everything else that's going on. Make sure you subscribe to the show on Itunes, stitcher, Google, play. Uh, Spotify. I'm everywhere now. Um, even on youtube though. Heck man, I may not, I may not do the show this way on youtube anymore. Let me know what you think about that too. So

Kevin Tumlinson: 31:52 anyway, I am happy we had this time chat. God bless each and every one of you. Make sure you subscribe and I'll see you all though. This Friday. See you Friday with a whole new episodes talking to GP James. You're not going to want to miss that. So I'll see you then.

Singer: 32:12 Wordslinger!

Jun 05 2019

33mins

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Rank #20: WPC-143 - From Indie to Traditional with Alisse Lee Goldenberg

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Alisse Lee Goldenberg is an award winning author of Horror, Young Adult Paranormal Romance, and Young Adult Fantasy fiction. She is currently working on three series: The Sitnalta Series, The Dybbuk Scrolls, and The Bath Salts Journals (co-authored with An Tran). She has her Bachelors of Education and a Fine Arts degree, and has studied fantasy and folk lore since she was a child. Alisse is also a screenwriter and playwright living in Toronto with her husband Brian, and their triplets Joseph, Phillip, and Hailey.

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Pick up a copy of Kevin Tumlinson's newest Dan Kotler archaeological thriller The Girl in the Mayan Tomb - https://books2read.com/mayan-tomb

CONNECT ONLINE:

Website(s): www.alisseleegoldenberg.com

Twitter handle(s): @AliLGoldenberg

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlisseLeeGoldenbergAuthor/ 

Amazon Author page: https://www.amazon.com/Alisse-Lee-Goldenberg/e/B006LNKMNA

THIS WEEK’S INDIE PUBLISHING NEWS:

Wordslinger Press Officially Launches — As self-serving as this may be, it’s my show. So nyah-nyah. But as of this week, I’ve launched Wordslinger Press. This will be the non-fiction arm of my publishing business, focusing primarily on creating content oriented toward the indie publishing community. You may already be aware of one of my other non-fiction books, 30-Day Author. This week I released a second Wordslinger book titled Writing A Better Book Description. This is a short, quick read—around 40 pages for $1.99, and available as an ebook everywhere you can think to buy one. This is the first in a series of quick guides meant to give authors and publishers a place to start when trying to figure out the mechanics of this business. Look for more of these in the near future. Pick up Writing A Better Book Description at https://books2read.com/betterbookdescriptions

Is Amazon being used for money laundering? — It’s that time of year, when authors are getting their 1099s just in time to pay Uncle Sam for the privilege of being able to work for a living. Some authors are getting a little extra surprise with with their tax forms, though. Patrick Reames got a 1099 indicating that he’d made nearly $24,000 from book sales on CreateSpace.This seemed unlikely, as Reames did not have any books published through Amazon’s POD service. Upon checking into it, he discovered that someone had used his identity to create an account and sell a book titled “Lower Days Ahead” for $555 per copy. Reames and others aren’t entirely sure what’s up, but one theory is that someone is using CreateSpace to launder pilfered credit cards, buying copies of the paperback and having Amazon deposit 60% of the sale into a bank account. If true, this represents a huge and scary problem for both Amazon and indie authors. But it’s the kind of cool plot twist one might turn into a thriller novel. I call dibs. https://krebsonsecurity.com/2018/02/money-laundering-via-author-impersonation-on-amazon/

Hachette CEO says eBooks are a stupid product  — Hachette is back in the news for comments from CEO Armaud Nourry. While in India, Nourry was interviewed by Scroll.in, and was pretty open about his disdain of the entire eBook market. “The ebook is a stupid product. It is exactly the same as print, except it’s electronic,” Nourry said. “There is no creativity, no enhancement, no real digital experience.” Nourry did admit that it was the entire industry that had not done a good job with eBooks … big of him. Frankly, the CEO’s comments highlight the fact that he and the rest of the traditional publishing industry seem to be utterly clueless about the impact of ebooks. That’s my opinion of course. As a seller of ebooks that are not priced higher than paperback books. http://www.thepassivevoice.com/2018/02/the-ebook-is-a-stupid-product-no-creativity-no-enhancement-says-the-hachette-group-ceo/

THIS EPISODE OF THE WORDSLINGER PODCAST IS SPONSORED BY:

Draft2Digital—Convert, publish, and distribute your book worldwide, with support the whole way. https://draft2digital.com/wordslinger

Wordslinger Press—This is your chance to start your indie author career right. Pick up books and other products to help you build and grow a successful writing career. Start growing at http://wordslingerpodcast.com

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Pick something up to read that will be tough to put down—Archeological Thrillers, Science Fiction, YA Fantasy and more, at https://kevintumlinson.com/books

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Feb 24 2018

51mins

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