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Society & Culture
History

Footnoting History

Updated 8 days ago

Society & Culture
History
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Welcome to Footnoting History! For links to further reading suggestions, a calendar of upcoming episodes, and the complete episode archive, visit us at FootnotingHistory.com!

Read more

Welcome to Footnoting History! For links to further reading suggestions, a calendar of upcoming episodes, and the complete episode archive, visit us at FootnotingHistory.com!

iTunes Ratings

282 Ratings
Average Ratings
197
40
18
12
15

Interesting!

By Geri Newton - Aug 15 2019
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Love, love, love this podcast, however, one presenters accent is annoyingly fake.

Great history podcast!

By SunshineRewards Fan - Jan 31 2019
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Outstanding history podcast which covers diverse, intelligent topics!

iTunes Ratings

282 Ratings
Average Ratings
197
40
18
12
15

Interesting!

By Geri Newton - Aug 15 2019
Read more
Love, love, love this podcast, however, one presenters accent is annoyingly fake.

Great history podcast!

By SunshineRewards Fan - Jan 31 2019
Read more
Outstanding history podcast which covers diverse, intelligent topics!
Cover image of Footnoting History

Footnoting History

Latest release on Dec 14, 2019

Read more

Welcome to Footnoting History! For links to further reading suggestions, a calendar of upcoming episodes, and the complete episode archive, visit us at FootnotingHistory.com!

Rank #1: The King James Bible: One Version of the Greatest Story Ever Told

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(Elizabeth and Nathan) In 1611, a group of men completed what has become one of the most well-known translations of the Bible. But why did King James ask them to do it?

May 17 2014

23mins

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Rank #2: The Execution of Mary, Queen of Scots

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(Lesley) The lives of Mary, Queen of Scots and Elizabeth I of England may be seen as a contrast in social expectations during early modern Europe worthy of scholarship, and television dramas. Perhaps lesser known is the story of Mary's trial and the legacy of her execution. Go behind the romanticism of Mary's life and learn about her death and the legacy of Elizabeth's final action to end of the life of her "Sister Queen."

Aug 29 2015

10mins

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Rank #3: Guy Fawkes

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(Kirsti) Remember, remember the Fifth of November! Guy Fawkes has become an iconic face of the American Occupy movement, but was the Gunpowder Plot really an effort to improve the lot of the lower classes? This week we will explore the religious terrorism that inspired a national holiday.

Nov 01 2014

13mins

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Rank #4: The Murderess in History

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(Lesley) Serial killers can be fascinating subjects. The men who hunt strangers are terrifying and interesting studies of the human mind. Yet women in history have also killed, and in some cases they have killed in large, unexpected numbers. In this episode, Lesley discusses five lesser-known serial killers from throughout history and analyzes how the female motivations from the past may differ from the more famous serial killers of modern day.

Aug 12 2017

15mins

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Rank #5: Empress Eugénie in Exile, Part I: Flight from Paris

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(Christine) When Napoleon III’s French Empire began to crumble in the late 19th century, his wife was trapped in Paris. Who could possibly help the Bonaparte Empress flee before the mobs got to her? An American dentist named Thomas Evans, of course. We’re kicking off the new year with a podcast about escapes and unlikely allies!

Jan 03 2015

21mins

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Rank #6: The Papal Pornocracy

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(Nathan) When popes are elected today, the cardinals of the Catholic Church meet in secret conclave. But it wasn't always so. In the 9th through 11th centuries, control of the Chair of St. Peter was fiercely contested between several Roman families, who put their sons, brothers, and lovers on the papal throne. In this episode, we will look at the murders, depositions, adultery, illicit relationships, trials of papal cadavers, and debauched behavior that allegedly characterized this period, as well as the important role played by two Roman noblewomen--Theodora and Marozia Theophylacti--that led some 19th century German historians to label this as a "pornocracy."

Feb 25 2018

25mins

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Rank #7: Richard the Lionheart on Crusade

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(Samantha) Richard the Lionheart hardly seems like a footnote in history. He is celebrated as a great warrior king and is commemorated in just about every film version of Robin Hood. Yet he has become so mythologized that his actual deeds have become obscured. This podcast will look at contemporary sources to re-construct Richard's journey and attempt to retake Jerusalem from the infidel.

Mar 22 2014

14mins

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Rank #8: Special Edition: British Royal Siblings

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(Elizabeth and Christine) As Britain celebrates the birth of Prince George's little brother or sister, Footnoting History is pondering royal siblings who became influential figures in the country's history. Join us as we discuss how so-called "spares" ranging from Empress Matilda in the 12th century to King George VI in the 20th, found themselves in the spotlight.

May 02 2015

41mins

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Rank #9: The Great Unpleasantness? World War One in Whodunits

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(Elizabeth and Lucy) The First World War was, infamously, a source of both transformation and trauma. In this episode, Lucy and Elizabeth find evidence of the ways in which the War to End all Wars influenced some of the greatest British mystery novels of the mid-20th century, especially how experiences of WWI were normalized, memorialized, or condemned within their pages.

Apr 08 2017

49mins

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Rank #10: Mental Institutions, Part II: The Rosenhan Experiment

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(Elizabeth) In the 1970s, Dr. David Rosenhan set out to show just how easy it is to be labeled  mentally ill.  Following the model of Nellie Bly, he and his pseudo-patients did just that.

Nov 15 2014

21mins

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Rank #11: King Henry I of England and the White Ship

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(Christine) In 1120, just when King Henry I of England thought he had achieved a much-needed peace, tragedy struck. What happened to the White Ship that broke the king's heart and changed the trajectory of the English monarchy? Find out on this episode.

Nov 03 2018

24mins

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Rank #12: Revolutionary Notre-Dame de Paris

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(Christine and Elizabeth) In April 2019, a fire at the French cathedral Notre-Dame de Paris had people around the world glued to their news feeds and televisions. Join Christine and Elizabeth for a discussion about some significant events that took place at Notre-Dame during one of France’s most turbulent periods, the span from the French Revolution to the exile of Napoleon III.

Further Reading

Diana Reid Haig, Walks Through Marie Antoinette’s Paris, Ravenhall Books, (2006).

Christopher Hibbert, The Days of the French Revolution, Perennial (1980).

Jasper Ridley, Napoleon III and Eugenie, Viking, (1979).

Andrew Roberts, Napoleon: A Life, Viking, (2014).

Desmond Seward. Eugénie: The Empress and Her Empire. Sutton Publishing, (2004).

Adam Zamoyski, Napoleon: The Man Behind the Myth, William Collins, (2018).

Baptism of the Prince Imperial, via Fondation Napoleon.

Cathedral of Notre-Dame in Paris via Fondation Napoleon.

The Day of Napoleon's Coronation, via Fondation Napoleon.

Notre-Dame de Paris Official Website.

Images

Malika Bouabdellah Dorbani, “July 28: Liberty Leading the People”, via Louvre.

--, "The Consecration of the Emperor Napoleon and the Coronation of Empress Joséphine on December 2, 1804", via Louvre.

Arrival of Napoleon III and Empress Eugenie’s cortege at Notre-Dame for their religious marriage ceremony, January 1853, via Bibliothèque nationale de France. 

Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette receiving well wishes from the people of Paris with Notre-Dame in the background, c 18th century, via Bibliothèque nationale de France. 

View of Notre-Dame de Paris and the New Sacristy, by Jean-Baptiste Lassus, 19th century, via Bibliothèque nationale de France. 

Related Content

This episode is part of our Revolutionary France Series.

Music: "Evening Melodrama" by Kevin Macleod (www.incompetech.com

Aug 24 2019

28mins

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Rank #13: Alan Turing

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(Kirsti) Alan Turing has been called a lay saint, and he surely was one of the greatest minds of the Greatest Generation. His work at Bletchley Park was vital to Allied success in World War II. Why, then, did he end his life under house arrest? And did *he* end it? Mysteries abound in this week's podcast!

Aug 23 2014

25mins

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Rank #14: Queer Women in the Golden Age of Mysteries

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(Lucy and Elizabeth) From the early to mid-twentieth century, queens of crime Sayers, Christie, Marsh, and Wentworth reigned supreme over British detective fiction. Their works not only reveal whodunit but give insight into how queer women lived in and were viewed by wider society from capital to countryside.

Oct 12 2013

23mins

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Rank #15: The Blazing World of Lady Margaret Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle

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(Nathan) Poet, playwright, philosopher, science theorist, and science fiction author--just a few of the occupations held by the 17th-century noblewoman, Lady Margaret Cavendish. One of the towering intellects of her day, Cavendish was a prodigious writer who was by her own account painfully shy, but whose works were revolutionary in their imaginativeness and insight. In this episode, we will explore the life of this remarkable woman, the story of her family during the tumult of the English Civil War, and how she navigated the male-dominated intellectual world of Stuart England.

May 05 2018

21mins

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Rank #16: Special Edition: The Marriage of John Quincy and Louisa Adams

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(Christine and Elizabeth) This weekend Britain celebrates the wedding of Prince Harry and American actress Meghan Markle, and we at Footnoting History are thrilled. Join us as we mark the occasion by discussing another cross-Atlantic union: the marriage of US President John Quincy Adams and Louisa Johnson of London, England.

May 19 2018

35mins

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Rank #17: The Strategic Failure of the Habsburg Chin

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(Kirsti) What’s the best approach to consolidating power and land within your family? The ambitious Habsburgs achieved greatness through marrying close relations—surely a sound policy that could have no consequences at all! This week we’ll talk about love (or the lack thereof), marriage, and the chin that sparked a war.

Sep 14 2013

10mins

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Rank #18: Drinking in Medieval England

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(Samantha) Do you like to drink? Well, so did people in the Middle Ages.  Tune in to learn about what people were drinking and about the culture associated with booze 700 years ago.

Mar 23 2013

14mins

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Rank #19: Before Napoleon: Josephine Bonaparte's First Marriage

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(Christine) May 29, 2014 marks the 200th anniversary of the death of Empress Josephine, first wife of Napoleon Bonaparte. Josephine’s life did not begin when she married the famous Corsican so this week, to honor her, we are looking at the time before she became a Bonaparte. Join Christine as she explores the years when Josephine answered to a different name, had a husband named Alexandre, and almost became a victim of the Reign of Terror.

May 25 2014

27mins

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Rank #20: Henry II and Thomas Becket, Part I: Friends

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(Christine) Being King of England isn't an easy task, but Henry II was aided by his good friend, Thomas Becket, serving as Chancellor. Then, Henry saw an opportunity to place Thomas in the highest position of power in the English church. What could go wrong?

Mar 09 2019

16mins

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The Forbidden Holiday

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(Nathan) The English Civil War of the mid-17th century ended in the beheading of King Charles I and the establishment of the Commonwealth under of Oliver Cromwell. It also marked a turning point in the celebration of Christmas in Britain and its American colonies. In this episode, we will examine the rise of Puritan groups to power in the English Parliament, their attitudes toward the moral and ritual reform of the English Church, and how these groups in Britain and the colonies sought to purge Catholic and "pagan" influences in their society by banning the celebration of Christmas.

Winship, Michael P., Hot Protestants: A History of Puritanism in England and America (Yale University Press, 2019).

Coffey, John, and Paul Lim., The Cambridge Companion to Puritanism (Cambridge University Press, 2008).

Daniels, Bruce, Puritans at Play: Leisure and Recreation in Colonial New England (Macmillan, 1995).

Walsh, James P. "Holy Time and Sacred Space in Puritan New England." American Quarterly 32, no. 1 (1980): 79-95.

Dec 14 2019

17mins

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Haitian Revolution, Part II: ​1794-1804

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(Elizabeth) Between 1794 and 1804, the newly emancipated people of the colony of Saint-Domingue created a government under the leadership of Toussaint Louverture and defeated Napoleonic forces to become their own independent country. In this episode, Elizabeth explains the role of Louverture but also the international ramifications of the creation of Haiti. 

Nov 30 2019

23mins

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Haitian Revolution, Part 1: 1791-1793

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(Elizabeth) In 1791, the enslaved people of France's wealthiest colony, Saint-Domingue, rose up for freedom. In this episode, Elizabeth examines the many factors that led to the abolition of slavery in the region now known as Haiti. The French Revolution, Kongolese leadership, social stratification, religion, and many other aspects all pay a role in what will become the first successful slave revolt of the Atlantic world. 

Nov 16 2019

22mins

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The Unquiet Afterlife of Elizabeth Siddal

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(Christine) Following a tumultuous life entrenched in Britain's art world, Elizabeth Siddal was laid to rest in 1862, but her body's peace would be disturbed only a few years later when her coffin was reopened. Find out the story behind the disturbance of the late artist and model's earthly remains in this episode.

Further Reading

Laura Bradley, "Elizabeth Siddal: Drawn into the Pre-Raphaelite Circle", Art Institute of Chicago Museum Studies, 18:2. (1992), pp. 136-145, 187.

J.B. Bullen, “Rossetti, Dante Gabriel (1828-1882)”, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, (2004/2015).

Marion R. Edwards, "Elizabeth Eleanor Siddal -- The Age Problem", The Burlington Magazine, 119:887, (February 1977), pp. 110, 112.

Paul Fyfe, "Accidental Death: Lizzie Siddal and the Poetics of the Coroner's Inquest", Victorian Review, 40:2, (Fall 2014), pp. 17-22.

Jan Marsh, "Did Rossetti Really Need to Exhume his Wife?" The Times Literary Supplement, (15 February 2012).

--"Imagining Elizabeth Siddal", New Statesman & Society, 1:15, (16 September 1988), pp. 32-36.

--, The Legend of Elizabeth Siddal, Quartet Books, 1989.

William Rossetti, "Dante Rossetti and Elizabeth Siddal", The Burlington Magazine for Connoisseurs, 1:3, (May 1903), pp. 273-295.

Carol Rumens, "Poem of the Week: Dead Love by Elizabeth Siddal", The Guardian, (14 September 2015).

Virginia Surtees, “Siddal, Elizabeth Eleanor (1829-1862)”, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, (2004).

The Complete Writings and Pictures of Dante Gabriel Rossetti: A Hypermedia Archive, Jerome McGann, ed.

"Poems by Dante Gabriel Rossetti", The Pall Mall Gazette, (21 April 1870) via British Library Newspapers, Part I: 1800-1900."

Pre-Raphaelite Sisters Exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery in London.

"Rossettis Poems", The Graphic, (14 May 1870) via British Library Newspapers, Part I: 1800-1900.

Nov 02 2019

18mins

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History for Halloween VI

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(Christine, Elizabeth, Kristin, Lesley, and Lucy) Ghosts, vampires, and more lurk in this year's installment of History for Halloween. Join us for our traditional episode featuring bits of history perfect for the creepiest time of the year.

Oct 19 2019

27mins

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The Chinese Exclusion Act

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(Nathan) In the 19th century, the Qing government of China faced major setbacks in the wake of military conflicts with European powers, spurring economic downturn and an immigration exodus out of the country. Increasing numbers of Chinese began to arrive on the West Coast of the United States, drawn by the California Gold Rush and seeking new economic opportunities to support their extended families back in China.  Soon, however, American economic conditions began to take on racist overtones, as public opinion began to turn against the Chinese.  In this episode, we look at the history of Chinese immigration to the United States, its increasing legal restrictions, and the long-term consequences of the Page Act of 1875 and the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882.

Further Reading

Kil Young Zo, Chinese Emigration into the United States, 1850-1880 (Arno, 1978).

Sucheng Chan, ed.  Entry Denied: Exclusion and the Chinese Community in America, 1882-1943 (Temple University Press, 1991).

Judy Yung, Unbound Feet: A Social History of Chinese Women in San Francisco (University of California Press, 1995).

Andrew Gyory, Closing the Gate: Race, Politics, and the Chinese Exclusion Act (University of North Carolina Press, 1998).

George Anthony Peffer, If They Don't Bring Their Women Here: Chinese Female Immigration Before Exclusion (University of Illinois Press, 1999).

Karen Leong, "'A Distant and Antagonistic Race': Constructions of Chinese Manhood in the Exclusionist Debates," in Across the Great Divide: Cultures of Manhood in the Amerian West.  Ed. Laura McCall, Matthew Basso, and Dee Garceau (Routledge, 2000), pp.131-48.

Eithne Luibhéid, Entry Denied: Controlling Sexuality at the Border (University of Minnesota Press, 2002).

Erika Lee, At America's Gates: Chinese Immigration during the Exclusion Era, 1882-1943 (University of North Carolina Press, 2003).

Erika Lee and Judy Yung, Angel Island: Immigrant Gateway to America (Oxford University Press, 2010).

Erika Lee, The Making of Asian America: A History (Simon & Schuster, 2015).

Music: "Evening Melodrama" by Kevin Macleod (www.incompetech.com) ​​​​​​

Oct 05 2019

26mins

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The Life and Travels of Newport Gardner

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(Kristin) In the 1760s, Occramer Marycoo was taken to the American colonies against his will. When he re-crossed the Atlantic in 1826, he was a free man who also went by the name Newport Gardner. In between, he was a composer, a teacher, a small-business owner, and a prominent member of Newport, Rhode Island Free African community. In this episode, Kristin follows the remarkable journey of the man, who bought his freedom and returned to Africa, known as both Occramer Marycoo and Newport Gardner.  

Further Reading

Edward E. Andrews, “The Crossings of Occramar Marycoo, or Newport Gardner,” in Atlantic Biographies: Individuals and Peoples in the Atlantic World, eds. Jeffrey A. Fortin and Mark Meuwese, Boston, (2014), 101-124.

John Russell Bartlett, History of Lotteries and the Lottery System in Rhode Island, University of Rhode Island, (2003).

Akeia A. F. Benard, “The Free African American Cultural Landscape: Newport, RI, 1774-1826”, PhD diss., University of Connecticut, (2008).

Elaine Forman Crane, A Dependent People: Newport, Rhode Island in the Revolutionary Era, Fordham University Press, (1985, 1992).

Newport Historical Society, “Newport Gardner Letter,” (2012).

—, “Mapping the Newport Experience”.

The Proceedings of the Free African Union Society and the African Benevolent Society, Newport, Rhode Island 1780-1824, ed. and intro, William H. Robinson, The Urban League of Rhode Island, (1976).

Richard C. Youngken, African Americans in Newport, The Rhode Island Historical Preservation & Heritage Commission, (1998).

“Crooked Shanks” performed.

Music: "Evening Melodrama" by Kevin Macleod (www.incompetech.com

Sep 21 2019

20mins

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Evil Humors and the Common Cold

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(Lucy) Ache in the head, running of the nose, and the throat being pierced by pain like a spear: medieval descriptions of common ailments are often familiar, as well as startlingly vivid. This podcast episode looks at everyday remedies in medieval Europe. From chicken and barley to spiced wine, many such remedies were delicious and nutritious. Administering medicine — from comfort food to careful concoctions — was based on both education and experience.

Further Reading

Winston Black, "I will add what the Arab once taught: Constantine the African in European Medical Verse," in A. Van Arsdall and T. Graham, (eds.) Herbs and Healers from the Ancient Mediterranean through the Medieval West: Essays in Honor of John M. Riddle, Ashgate, (2012), 153-186.

Luis García Ballester, "Introduction," in Practical Medicine from Salerno to the Black Death, Cambridge University Press, (1994), 1-29.

John Riddle, "Research Procedures in Evaluating Medieval Medicine," in B.S. Bowers (ed.) The Medieval Hospital and Medical Practice, Ashgate, (2007), 3-18.

Faith Wallis, ed., Medieval Medicine: A Reader, University of Toronto Press, (2010).

Practica Rogerii, Wellcome Collection.

​Faith Wallis, ed. Medieval Medicine: A Reader. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2010.

Winston Black, "I will add what the Arab once taught: Constantine the African in European Medical Verse," in: A. Van Arsdall and T. Graham, (eds.) Herbs and Healers from the Ancient Mediterranean through the Medieval WestEssays in Honor of John M. Riddle: 153-186. Farnham: Ashgate, 2012.

Luis García Ballester. "Introduction," in: Practical Medicine from Salerno to the Black Death: 1-29. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994.

John Riddle, "Research Procedures in Evaluating Medieval Medicine," in: B.S. Bowers (ed.) The Medieval Hospital and Medical Practice: 3-18. Farnham: Ashgate, 2007.

Music: "Evening Melodrama" by Kevin Macleod (www.incompetech.com) ​

Sep 07 2019

11mins

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Revolutionary Notre-Dame de Paris

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(Christine and Elizabeth) In April 2019, a fire at the French cathedral Notre-Dame de Paris had people around the world glued to their news feeds and televisions. Join Christine and Elizabeth for a discussion about some significant events that took place at Notre-Dame during one of France’s most turbulent periods, the span from the French Revolution to the exile of Napoleon III.

Further Reading

Diana Reid Haig, Walks Through Marie Antoinette’s Paris, Ravenhall Books, (2006).

Christopher Hibbert, The Days of the French Revolution, Perennial (1980).

Jasper Ridley, Napoleon III and Eugenie, Viking, (1979).

Andrew Roberts, Napoleon: A Life, Viking, (2014).

Desmond Seward. Eugénie: The Empress and Her Empire. Sutton Publishing, (2004).

Adam Zamoyski, Napoleon: The Man Behind the Myth, William Collins, (2018).

Baptism of the Prince Imperial, via Fondation Napoleon.

Cathedral of Notre-Dame in Paris via Fondation Napoleon.

The Day of Napoleon's Coronation, via Fondation Napoleon.

Notre-Dame de Paris Official Website.

Images

Malika Bouabdellah Dorbani, “July 28: Liberty Leading the People”, via Louvre.

--, "The Consecration of the Emperor Napoleon and the Coronation of Empress Joséphine on December 2, 1804", via Louvre.

Arrival of Napoleon III and Empress Eugenie’s cortege at Notre-Dame for their religious marriage ceremony, January 1853, via Bibliothèque nationale de France. 

Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette receiving well wishes from the people of Paris with Notre-Dame in the background, c 18th century, via Bibliothèque nationale de France. 

View of Notre-Dame de Paris and the New Sacristy, by Jean-Baptiste Lassus, 19th century, via Bibliothèque nationale de France. 

Related Content

This episode is part of our Revolutionary France Series.

Music: "Evening Melodrama" by Kevin Macleod (www.incompetech.com

Aug 24 2019

28mins

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The Emu War

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(Lesley) Of all the wars in the 20th century, no loss was more frustrating than the military operation against the emu in Western Australia in 1932. Learn about the treatment of these enormous flightless birds as an organized military formation and the subsequent disaster as no amount of military force could successfully and effectively defeat these warriors of the animal world.

Further ReadingAdrian Burton, "Tell me, mate, what were emus like?", Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment. 11:6 (2013).

Bec Crew, "The Great Emu War: in which some large, flightless birds unwittingly foiled the Australian Army." Scientific American. (2014).

Murray Johnson,  "'Feathered foes': soldier settlers and Western Australia's 'Emu War' of 1932". Journal of Australian Studies. 30:88 (2006), 147–157.Music: "Evening Melodrama" by Kevin Macleod (www.incompetech.com)

Aug 10 2019

15mins

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An Extraordinary Medicine Called Theriac

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(Kristin) Theriac was a medicine of legendary origins, multiple ingredients, and a reputation for efficacy that extended for hundreds of years. It was said to be able to cure everything from migraines to the plague. In this episode, Kristin looks at some of the ingredients and processes that went into making theriac, where it could be found, who was selling it, and whether there was anything behind its extraordinary claims.

Further ReadingHoward Brody, “Ritual, Medicine, and the Placebo Response,” in The Problem of Ritual Efficacy, eds. William S. Sax, Johannes Quack, and Jan Weinhold, Oxford University Press, (2010), 151-168.Christiane Nockels Fabbri, “Treating Medieval Plague: The Wonderful Virtues of Theriac,” Early Science and Medicine 12:3 (2007): 247-283.Michael McVaugh, “The Conceptual Background of Medieval Pharmacy,” in Arnaldi de Villanova: Opera medica omnia, vol 2, University of Barcelona, (1975), 13-30.“Theriac,” in The Trotula: An English Translation of the Medieval Compendium of Women’s Medicine, ed. and trans. by Monica H. Green, University of Pennsylvania Press, (2002), 132-133. ​Music: "Evening Melodrama" by Kevin Macleod (www.incompetech.com

Jul 27 2019

19mins

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Purgatory is Not the Medium Place

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(Nathan) The landscape of the Christian afterlife has never been static, and over the last 2,000 years, the theology of what the hereafter looks like has evolved drastically. In this episode, we trace the origins and medieval development of one of the most significant and controversial Christian beliefs: Purgatory.

Further ReadingJacques Le Goff,  The Birth of Purgatory,  Trans. Arthur Goldhammer., University of Chicago Press, 1986.Abagail Frey, ed.  A New History of Penance.  Brill, 2008.Robert Meens, Penance in Medieval Europe, 600-1200.  Cambridge University Press, 2014.Isabel Moreira,  Heaven's Purge: Purgatory in Late Antiquity.  Oxford University Press, 2010.Peter Brown, "The Decline of the Empire of God: Amnesty, Penance, and the Afterlife from Late Antiquity to the Middle Ages."  In Last Things: Death and the Apocalypse in the Middle Ages.  Ed. Caroline Walker Bynum and Paul Freedman.  University of Pennsylvania Press, 2000.  pp.41-59.Peter Brown, "The End of the Ancient Other World: Death and the Afterlife Between Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages."  The Tanner Lectures on Human Values 20 (1999): 19-85.Carolyn Walker Bynum, The Resurrection of the Dead in Western Christianity, 200-1336.  Columbia University Press, 1995.Joseph Ntedika,  L'Évolution de la doctrine du purgatoire chez saint Augustin.  Études Augustiniennes, 1966.Alan F.  Segal,LIfe After Death: A History of the Afterlife in Western Religion.  Doubleday, 1989.​Marina Smythe, "The Origins of Purgatory Through the Lens of Seventh-Century Irish Eschatology," Traditio 58 (2003): 91-132.​Music: "Evening Melodrama" by Kevin Macleod (www.incompetech.com

Jul 13 2019

43mins

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Jessie Pope, (In)Famous Poet of World War One

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(Elizabeth) One of the most famous poets of WWI is largely unknown today. In this episode, Elizabeth reviews the life and poems of Jessie Pope to determine who she was, why Wilfred Owen hated her so, and why we don't know more about her today.

May 18 2019

17mins

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The Woman Who Signed the Declaration of Independence

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(Lesley) The Declaration of Independence has many well-known men's names on it, especially that of John Hancock. But what of the woman whose name appears on the printed version of this auspicious document? In this episode, Lesley explores the life and role of early American printer Mary Katharine Goddard. An important contributor to the fledgling American government, Goddard's name should be better known for politics, journalism, and revolution.

May 04 2019

14mins

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King John and His Dogs

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(Kristin) King John is often remembered as one of England’s most inept and disliked rulers. By the time he was forced to sign the Magna Carta in 1215, John lost authority, territory, and a lot of friends. Some, however, did remain loyal. In this week’s episode, Kristin looks at King John and his dogs. 

Apr 20 2019

10mins

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Harlem Renaissance Man: James Weldon Johnson

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(Lucy) Diplomat and hymn-writer, Broadway lyricist, activist, and historian, James Weldon Johnson was an early figurehead of the NAACP. This week's episode explores his life and multifaceted legacy.

Apr 06 2019

14mins

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Henry II and Thomas Becket, Part II: Rivals

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(Christine) Not all friendships are meant to last, but some go the extra mile and turn into bitter rivalries. Picking up where we left off at the end of Part I, this episode follows the relationship between King Henry II and Archbishop Thomas Becket to the violent ending that left only one man standing.

Mar 23 2019

18mins

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Henry II and Thomas Becket, Part I: Friends

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(Christine) Being King of England isn't an easy task, but Henry II was aided by his good friend, Thomas Becket, serving as Chancellor. Then, Henry saw an opportunity to place Thomas in the highest position of power in the English church. What could go wrong?

Mar 09 2019

16mins

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The History of Grading

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(Nathan) B-, 3.85, 16/20, upper second--modern methods of gauging a student's performance in a class can vary widely from country to country. But most of these systems are shockingly recent developments, and for much of human history "grades" as such didn't exist. In this episode, we'll look at the history of American systems of educational evaluation from their emergence in the 18th century to their standardization in the 20th.

Further ReadingJack Schneider and Ethan Hutt. "Making the grade: a history of the A–F marking scheme." Journal of Curriculum Studies 46, no. 2 (2014): 201-224.J. A. Laska & T. Juarez, eds.  Grading and Marking in American Schools: Two Centuries of Debate.  Springfield, IL: Charles C. Thomas, 1992.David L. McArthur, "Educational Assessment: A Brief History," in David McArthur, ed. Alternative Approaches to the Assessment of Achievement (Norwell, MA: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1987).​​Music: "Evening Melodrama" by Kevin Macleod (www.incompetech.com)

Feb 24 2019

16mins

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The End is Nigh! The Apocalypse in the Renaissance

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(Lucy) At the dawn of the 1500s, Europe was enjoying more wealth than ever before. Consumption was conspicuous, luxury was accessible… and sin was rife. Preachers like Savonarola foretold the end of the world, and people listened. In this episode of Footnoting History, learn about falling church towers, divine portents, papal curses, and how the European populace dealt with new identities and new opportunities at the opening of the early modern period.

Feb 10 2019

15mins

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iTunes Ratings

282 Ratings
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Interesting!

By Geri Newton - Aug 15 2019
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Love, love, love this podcast, however, one presenters accent is annoyingly fake.

Great history podcast!

By SunshineRewards Fan - Jan 31 2019
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Outstanding history podcast which covers diverse, intelligent topics!