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The Takeaway

Updated 4 days ago

Rank #24 in Daily News category

Daily News
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Politics
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A fresh alternative in daily news featuring critical conversations, live reports from the field, and listener participation. The Takeaway provides a breadth and depth of world, national, and regional news coverage that is unprecedented in public media.

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A fresh alternative in daily news featuring critical conversations, live reports from the field, and listener participation. The Takeaway provides a breadth and depth of world, national, and regional news coverage that is unprecedented in public media.

iTunes Ratings

345 Ratings
Average Ratings
253
32
20
19
21

Positive take on current topics

By avirrr - May 22 2019
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Interesting interviews and information

Keep Tanzina Vega

By Carolsummit - Jan 22 2019
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An outstanding commentator and interviewer.

iTunes Ratings

345 Ratings
Average Ratings
253
32
20
19
21

Positive take on current topics

By avirrr - May 22 2019
Read more
Interesting interviews and information

Keep Tanzina Vega

By Carolsummit - Jan 22 2019
Read more
An outstanding commentator and interviewer.

Listen to:

Cover image of The Takeaway

The Takeaway

Updated 4 days ago

Read more

A fresh alternative in daily news featuring critical conversations, live reports from the field, and listener participation. The Takeaway provides a breadth and depth of world, national, and regional news coverage that is unprecedented in public media.

Politics with Amy Walter: The Divided States of Government

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Not that long ago, state government was seen as one of the last places for functional governing. But, over the last 10 years, state politics have become as polarized as Washington, DC. 

At the same time, 2020 Democratic candidates for president are debating which approach they should take to governing. Some, like former Vice President Joe Biden, argue that voters want a return to a more pragmatic style of governing. Senators Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders are less interested in bringing GOP legislators to the table than they are in bringing a grass-roots revolution to Washington. 

Wisconsin State Senator Janet Bewley joins us to discuss what it's like to govern in the minority. Governing reporter Alan Greenblatt weighs in about how state legislatures have become increasingly entrenched in party politics. 

Political analysts Joel Payne and Ty Mastdrof join us for analysis of the last debate. Plus, New York Times congressional reporter Nick Fandos fills us in on the latest surrounding the impeachment inquiry.

Nov 22 2019

48mins

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The Juggle Is Real: Navigating Life In Your 40s

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 If you're in your 40s and more tired than you've ever been because you are juggling life, money, aging parents, aging yourself, not wanting to play games any more etc. raise your hand. 🖐🏼 How are you coping?

— Tanzina Vega (@tanzinavega) May 9, 2019

After a tweet from host Tanzina Vega about coping with life in your 40s went viral, we kicked off a series exploring the challenges and opportunities of life in your 40s. We've brought all those conversations together in this special podcast episode called "The Juggle Is Real: Navigating Life in Your Forties." 

May 25 2019

43mins

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Politics with Amy Walter: Democratic Socialism is Having a Moment; Will Voters be Receptive to its Message?

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Throughout most of the 20th century and beyond, the term "socialism" has carried a lot of baggage in U.S. political history. Socialism itself has deep historical roots in the U.S. But the ideology became a toxic brand thanks in part to the Cold War, as Soviet republics and their imitators around the world saw authoritarians seize power under the guise of socialism.

But almost 30 years after the fall of the Soviet Union, socialism is once again having a moment in mainstream U.S. politics. As politicians like Senator Bernie Sanders and Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez pitch their Democratic Socialism to a generation not familiar with Cold War rhetoric, skeptics remain unconvinced about the promise of sweeping social reform.

Guests:

Bernie Sanders, United States Senator from Vermont, Democratic presidential candidate

Peter Beinart, contributing editor for The Atlantic and professor at the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism

Sheryl Gay Stolberg, Congressional Correspondent for The New York Times

Ilya Somin, Professor of Law at George Mason University

Jun 14 2019

44mins

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Politics with Amy Walter: There's a Generational Divide Upending U.S. Politics

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After a bruising political week in which President Trump's feud with "The Squad" reached a fever pitch, Amy Walter reflects on how both Republicans and Democrats could be alienating crucial voters ahead of the 2020 elections.

Plus, we look at the yawning generation gap, as voters from different eras compete for political relevance.

With the U.S. electorate divided along generational lines, there are transformational demographic trends already having clear impacts on the way 2020 presidential candidates are trying to appeal to voters. But while the Baby Boomer bloc is increasingly eclipsed by the combined numbers of Generation X, Millennials, and Generation Z, so far it's an open question whether or not the influence of younger voters will have the final say in determining the results of the Democratic primary, or the general election.

This week, we look at the different generations active in U.S. politics, and try to figure out the forces at play in deciding the country's future.

Guests:

Dave Weigel, national political reporter for The Washington Post

Paul Taylor, author of The Next America: Boomers, Millennials, and the Looming Generational Showdown

Clare Malone, senior political writer at FiveThirtyEight

Manuel Pastor, professor of sociology and American Studies & Ethnicity at the University of Southern California

Jul 19 2019

47mins

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Politics with Amy Walter: Digital Ads and the Wild West of Political Campaigning

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As U.S. voters increasingly spend more of their lives online, political campaigns and other outside groups are trying to figure out how best to meet them on these digital spaces.

But in the rush to perfect the effectiveness of digital ads, regulators have been slow to catch up. Will the lessons of 2016, and what can happen when nefarious actors hijack those platforms to spread disinformation, prove an effective warning for 2020 and beyond? And will Democrats be able to catch up to the Trump campaign's robust online operation?

Also, continuing with our "Candidate Talk" series, Amy talks with Senator Michael Bennet about trying to break out in a crowded Democratic field.

Guests:

Patrick Ruffini, Republican digital strategist, partner and co-founder of Echelon Insights, a polling and data analytics firm

Guy Cecil, Chairman of Priorities USA, a Democratic super PAC

Kevin Roose, tech columnist for Business Day at The New York Times

Young Mie Kim, professor at the school of journalism and mass communication at the University of Wisconsin-Madison

Ellen Weintraub, Chair of the Federal Election Commission

Michael Bennet, United States Senator from Colorado, Democratic Presidential candidate

Jun 23 2019

46mins

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1619: The Enduring Legacy of Slavery in the United States

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1619: The Truth About 400 Years of Slavery

Four hundred years ago this month, the first group of enslaved Africans were forcibly brought by British colonists to what is now the United States. 

1619: The Racist Roots of the U.S. Racial Wealth Gap

Sandy Darity breaks down the long term economic consequences of the aftermath of slavery and ties it into the racial wealth gap that we’re seeing today.

1619: How Slavery Has Impacted the Empathy Gap in our Country

Scholar Clint Smith explains why we don’t show the same empathy to those who suffer the consequences of our country’s actions against African Americans even today.

Read the 1619 Project here.

Guests: 

Dr. Ibram X Kendi

Stephanie E. Jones-Rogers

William Darity, who goes by Sandy.

Clint Smith

Aug 20 2019

42mins

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Politics with Amy Walter: The Impact of Black Voters: “When We Show Up, We Transform How Power Operates”

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When it comes to elections there’s always a key voting bloc that gets the media attention. If candidate X wins the FILL IN THE BLANK they’ll win the election.

Over the past few years, we’ve heard a lot about the Latino vote.

The white working class vote.

The suburban women vote.

But a core constituency of the Democratic electorate, since Barack Obama was elected has not gotten the same level of attention: African Americans.

Will this change before 2020?

According to the strategists we talked to, if Democrats want to win back the White House, it better.

Guests:

Alicia Garza, a founder of the Black Lives Matter Global Network, and the head of the Black Futures Lab

Bakari Sellers, former South Carolina state representative and a CNN contributor

Thelisha Eaddy, South Carolina Public Radio reporter

Theodore  R. Johnson, Senior Fellow at the Brennan Center

Aimee Allison, founder of She the People

Jun 07 2019

45mins

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Politics with Amy Walter: Democrats Divided

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The ongoing migrant crisis is getting worse, as the Department of Homeland Security is running out of room to house the increasing number of migrants detained at the border. And when evidence of the conditions dominated the news cycle earlier this month, the outrage prompted lawmakers to get involved. But how that involvement played out became the latest point of contention between factions within the Democratic Party.

The Senate passed a spending bill aimed at alleviating what the Trump administration said was a lack of funding to properly house detained migrants. But the Democratic-controlled House, wary of writing a blank check without strict limits on how that money would be spent, sent a revised bill back to the Senate. But when that bill died with Mitch McConnell, the conservative-leaning "Problem Solvers" caucus of the House Democrats signaled that they were willing to pass the Senate's no-strings-attached bill, with or without the support of Speaker Pelosi.

When Pelosi ultimately sided with the Problem Solvers, it set off a backlash among the party's progressive wing, most notably Congresswomen Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Ayanna Pressley, Rashida Tlaib, and Ilhan Omar, known collectively as "The Squad." And the outrage breathed new life into a long-simmering division between The Squad and Party leadership.

This week, Amy examines how deep these divisions go, and whether or not party unity is possible heading into 2020.

Also, Representative Seth Moulton from Massachusetts, who's running for the Democratic presidential nomination, joins Amy for her Candidate Talk series.

Guests:

Ryan Grim, the DC bureau chief at The Intercept, and the author of We’ve Got People: From Jesse Jackson to AOC, the End of Big Money and the Rise of a Movement

Seth Moulton, Represents Massachusetts's Sixth District in the House of Representatives, Democratic presidential candidate

Heidi Heitkamp, former Senator from North Dakota

Steve Kornacki, National Political Correspondent for NBC News and MSNBC, author of the book The Red and the Blue

Eric Liu, CEO of Citizen University and executive director of the Aspen Institute’s Citizenship and American Identity Program, author of Become America: Civic Sermons on Love, Responsibility, and Democracy

Jul 13 2019

47mins

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Politics with Amy Walter: Unpacking the Democratic Debates from the Aspen Ideas Festival

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At this year's Aspen Ideas Festival, Amy hosted back-to-back post-debate discussions with a panel of influential writers. We'll hear excerpts from the conversation, in an effort to provide analysis of the first Democratic debates of the 2020 presidential campaign.

We also talk with two academics to discuss how their policy work could be used in tandem with politics to bring about change in areas of technology and inequality.

Finally, Amy reflects on the LGBTQ movement, on the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising.

Guests:

Kristen Soltis Anderson, co-founder of Echelon Insights and author of The Selfie Vote: Where Millennials Are Leading America (and How Republicans Can Keep Up)

Rich Lowry, editor-in-chief of National Review

Jonathan Capehart, opinion writer for The Washington Post and a member of its editorial board; he also hosts the “Cape Up” podcast

Raj Chetty, professor of economics at Harvard University, and the director of Opportunity Insights

Ramesh Srinivasan, professor and director of the Digital Cultures Lab at UCLA

Ilene Chaiken, co-creator of The L Word and executive producer of Empire

Jun 28 2019

46mins

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The Republican Response to the Impeachment Inquiry 2019-10-24

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The Republican Response to the Impeachment Inquiry

We hear from a Republican strategist on the ongoing impeachment inquiry.

How the Media Covered Hillary Clinton's Emails

The Clinton email scandal has been put to bed with a new State Department report, but the media didn't treat it the way it did the rest of the email story.

Houston Astros Controversy Highlights Problems within the MLB

An Astros assistant general manager yelled profane language at several female reporters in the Astros clubhouse over the weekend.

Other segments:

HUD Officials Admit to Withholding Funding from Puerto Rico

Last week, officials from the Department of Housing and Urban Development admitted that they purposefully delayed sending hurricane relief to Puerto Rico.

Some Parents Are Saying "No" to Homework

Many parents and teachers think homework needs to be reduced, or even eliminated, for elementary school children.

Oct 24 2019

31mins

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Podcast: US Census in Crisis: As Supreme Court Weighs Citizenship Question, New Study Finds Key Groups May Be Overlooked 2019-06-05

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US Census in Crisis: As Supreme Court Weighs Citizenship Question, New Study Finds Key Groups May Be Overlooked

Black and Latino populations could be under-counted, according to a new study by the Urban Institute.

The Enduring Battle Over Access to Educational Materials for Inmates

An Illinois prison recently removed 200 books from its prison library. Many state prison systems claim certain books cause significant security risks, but advocates call it censorship.

"Bingeing is Not Recommended": Handmaid's Tale Creator Bruce Miller on Building a Dystopia 

The Handmaid's Tale season 3 is out now. Tanzina Vega talks with its creator about bringing Margaret Atwood's world to life in this historical moment.

Other segments:

Utah's Population Is Growing; Can the Housing Market Keep Up?

Out-of-staters are moving to Utah, and Utahns are staying put. The pressure on the housing market is driving prices up. How is the Beehive state coping?

Repression in Sudan: Military Brutally Attacks Protest Camp

With the latest attack by the military counsel, where does the revolution go next?

Jun 05 2019

30mins

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Celebrating One Year of Amy Walter

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Five times in history, the candidate elected president of the United States was not the winner of the national popular vote. With two of those five elections in recent memory, and a demographic shift that will likely continue the trend, the electoral college is facing increasing criticism and calls for abolishment. 

On the one-year anniversary of the launch of Politics with Amy Walter from The Takeaway, the show takes a look back at the history of the electoral college. Amy moderates a debate for and against the institution, plus an exploration of the public’s shifting support for the electoral college.

Guests include The New York Times columnist and CBS News political analyst Jamelle BouieCarrie Dann, political editor for NBC News, Ruy Teixeira, Senior Fellow at the Center for American Progress and Lina Newton, associate professor of political science at Hunter College.

May 31 2019

45mins

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Is Vaping More Dangerous Than It Seems? 2019-09-05

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Is Vaping More Dangerous Than It Seems?

Hundreds of patients with severe respiratory illnesses have reported using e-cigarette products.

The Legacy of Venus and Serena Williams 

Serena Williams won her 100th singles victory at the Open, despite reports that she injured her ankle just days before. 

Pro-Beijing Counter-Protesters in the U.S. Clash with Pro-Hong Kong Protesters

What do these clashes tell us about the protests' future?

Other segments: 

North Carolina Judges Rule Republican-Drawn Legislative District Map Is Unconstitutional 

Three North Carolina judges gave the Republican state legislature until September 18th to redraw the map. 

When Can the Government Separate a Parent from Child at the Border? 

Beth Fertig is a senior reporter with WNYC and she told us one father’s story.

Sep 05 2019

32mins

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Two More Witnesses Testify at Public Hearings 2019-11-21

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Two More Witnesses Testify at Public Hearings

Fiona Hill, the former top Russia adviser to the Trump White House, and David Holmes, a political counselor at the U.S. Embassy in Ukraine, are at Capitol Hill this morning. 

The Legacy of Pay-to-Play Ambassador Appointments

President Donald Trump has raised some eyebrows over his nominees for cushy ambassadorships abroad.

HBCU's and Other Minority-Serving Institutions Set to Lose $255 Million in Funding Over D.C. Deadlock

The Department of Education says funding will go through for the rest of the year but planning for next year is stalled amid concerns that programs will be cut and staff laid off.

Indigenous Communities Get Unequal Recovery Aid After a Natural Disaster

U.S. citizens on average receive $26 per person from the federal government, but tribal citizens only get about $3 per person, per year.

Nov 21 2019

37mins

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Politics with Amy Walter: the Upcoming 2020 Elections in the Battleground State

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This week, Politics with Amy Walter is coming to you from Detroit.

The city has gotten a lot of attention over the course of the week as it hosted the latest round of democratic debates. But why Detroit? Because — Michigan.

President Donald Trump won Michigan by just over 10,000 votes in 2016. But Democrats are hoping to put the state firmly back in their column. After a strong showing in the 2018 midterms, Democrats are feeling hopeful. Republicans say there's still a lot of support for President Trump — even in the counties, the Democrats were able to flip. 

Guests:

Congresswoman Debbie Dingell (D), representing Michigan's 12th District

Lavora Barnes, Chair of the Michigan Democratic Party

Congresswoman Haley Stevens (D), representing Michigan's 11th District

Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer (D)

Dr. Abdul El-Sayed, a progressive activist who ran against Whitmer in the primary

Congressman Paul Mitchell (R), representing Michigan's 10th District

Jamie Roe, a Michigan-based Republican strategist

Aug 02 2019

45mins

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Politics with Amy Walter: Are Democrats Breaking Up with Big Tech?

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What began as a love affair is now a relationship on the rocks. This week on Politics with Amy Walter, a look at the relationship between Democrats and big tech giants like Amazon, Facebook, and Google. 

When it comes to big tech, the conversation has shifted from if they should be regulated to how and by whom. For a long time, these tech giants grew quickly and quietly beyond what many of us could’ve imagined. As a result, incredible wealth and power started to concentrate in Silicon Valley, largely unchecked by Congress.

Tim Wu, the author of The Curse of Bigness and a professor at Columbia University, explains how big tech companies became embedded in the social and economic fabric of our country. Senator Mark Warner is one of a growing number of Democrats who are critical of how much power big tech has amassed, and he shares his ideas on how to rein them in on today's show. Representative Ro Khanna, the Democrat who represents Silicon Valley in Congress, walks us through the adversarial nature of the relationship between Silicon Valley and Washington, D.C.

Plus, Cecilia Kang, a tech reporter at the New York Times, gives an update on the antitrust investigations going on. Finally, journalist and author Charles Duhigg explains the spectacular growth of Amazon, from its early days as an online retailer to the tech giant it is today. 

Oct 25 2019

48mins

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Politics with Amy Walter: "The World's Most Exclusive Club"

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In his 1957 book, Citadel, journalist William White refers to the Senate as “the world’s most exclusive club.” But for many high-profile Democrats, it's a club that seems to have gone out of style. In April, Stacey Abrams, the Democrat who narrowly lost the race for governor of Georgia in 2018, announced that she is not running for Senate. Joaquin Castro in Texas, Ambassador Susan Rice in Maine, Congresswoman Cindy Axne and former Governor Tom Vilsack of Iowa have all made the same decision. Then, there's the Democrats who have decided to run for president instead: John Hickenlooper, the former governor of Colorado, and Beto O’Rourke who rose to prominence in 2018 when he challenged Texas Senator Ted Cruz.  What's going on here? 

Jennifer Duffy, a political analyst covering US Senate and Governor's races for the Cook Political Report, explains why for some Democrats the Senate seems to have lost its allure.

Frances Lee, a political science professor at the University of Maryland, tells us how we got a Senate in the first place. 

Osita Nwanevu, a staff writer at the New Yorker covering politics and policy in Washington, D.C., and Logan Dobson, a Republican strategist and the former director of Data and Analytics for the National Republican Senatorial Committee, debate equal state representation in the U.S Senate.

Alan Frumin, the Senate Parliamentarian from 1987 to 1995 and again from 2001 to 2012, answers questions from our listeners about Senate rules and procedures. 

Amy's Final Take:

The debate about how the Senate works - or doesn’t - is part of a bigger debate and a bigger issue that I’ve talked about a lot on this show; the breakdown of trust and faith in institutions. The whole deal in politics is that winners treat the losers fairly because they know that someday they will be on the losing side and want to be treated with respect and fairness. But, that’s not where we are now. Americans are more distrustful of the other party than ever before. But, changing the underlying structures of the system creates all kinds of unintended consequences that may only exacerbate the problems they are trying to fix.  Blowing up or reconstructing institutions like the Senate may solve a short-term problem, but in the long term our bigger problem that needs fixing is to find faith and trust in one another.

May 10 2019

47mins

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Trump Inc. Explores Web of Connections Between President Trump and Ukraine 2019-10-02

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Trump Inc. Explores Web of Connections Between President Trump and Ukraine

Even before he became president, Donald Trump had ties with the former Soviet Republic.

"It's Fueled My Fire": Formerly-Imprisoned Journalist Reflects One Year Since Khashoggi's Death

Washington Post writer Jason Rezaian reflects on his colleague Jamal Khashoggi's legacy.

Robbie Robertson on His New Album "Sinematic"

Since leaving The Band in the 1970s, Robbie Robertson has put out multiple solo albums and written a memoir. This month, Robertson released his latest solo record, Sinematic. 

Other segments:

Harvard Can Continue to Consider Race in Admissions, Federal Judge Rules

Using affirmative action in the admissions process does not violate any laws.

Amber Guyger's Conviction and the Argument For Self-Defense

The former Dallas police officer was found guilty of killing her unarmed black neighbor in his own apartment last year.

Oct 02 2019

39mins

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Sondland Testimony Implicates Key Trump Administration Officials 2019-11-20

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Sondland Testimony Implicates Key Trump Administration Officials

Gordon Sondland, the former ambassador to the European Union, gave riveting testimony today in the impeachment hearing that has rocked the nations.  

The Legacy of Julian Assange

Yesterday, Swedish prosecutors dropped their investigation of rape and sexual assault allegations against Julian Assange.

99% of Native American Languages are in Danger of Going Extinct 

Despite efforts to preserve them, many indigenous languages in the United States are at risk of going extinct.

Nearly Two Thousand Dams at Risk for Failure in the U.S.

An investigation from the Associated Press found that almost 1,700 dams pose potential risk for failure in 44 states and Puerto Rico. 

Racism Pushed Chinese Americans to Leave the U.S. En Masse in the 20th Century

During a time that people flocked to the U.S. for a better life, second and third generation Chinese Americans chose to leave and pursue the same dream in China.  

Nov 20 2019

49mins

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Podcast: The History Behind President Trump's Accusations of "Disloyalty" Against Jewish Americans 2019-08-22

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The History Behind President Trump's Accusations of "Disloyalty" Against Jewish Americans 

On Tuesday, President Trump said that any Jewish person who votes for a Democrat is either guilty of ignorance or “great disloyalty," an anti-Semitic trope that dates back centuries.

New Trump Rules would Detain Migrant Families and Children Indefinitely

What does this mean for migrant families and children in government custody?

Sports from Grade School to College: The Rise of "Pay to Play"

As sports get more expensive, lower and middle-income children are dropping off while their wealthier peers get into the game.

Other segments:

The Risks of Denying the Flu Vaccine to Migrant Children

The government will not administer the flu vaccine to families in detention camps, despite the fact that several children in detention facilities have died as a result of the flu.

Aug 22 2019

30mins

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Politics with Amy Walter: The State of the Democratic Primary Field

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The road to the White House is rarely a linear path. That was abundantly clear this week when Senator Kamala Harris announced that she was suspending her campaign. The announcement came as a surprise to many because at the time of launch, Senator Harris was one to watch. Political reporters Darren Sands, Laura Barron-Lopez, and Maya King join us to discuss the end of her campaign and what challenges the Democratic Party faces in putting forth the best candidate. 

Also, Congressman Krishnamoorthi provides an update on the impeachment inquiry. Finally, Caitlin Zaloom and Alia Wong describe how college went from being accessible to burdensome and expensive. 

Dec 06 2019

45mins

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NATO's Struggle to Define Its Future 2019-12-04

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NATO's Struggle to Define Its Future

To commemorate its 70th anniversary, leaders of the 29 member countries are gathering in London this week. 

"Porgy and Bess" and the Legacy of Black Opera

"Porgy and Bess" is the most renowned Opera for black singers, but should it still be in 2019?

President Trump is Allowing States to Ban Refugees—Utah is Asking for More

Earlier this fall, President Trump gave states and cities the authority to veto refugee resettlements. But the Governor of Utah is asking the president for more refugees, not fewer.

In North Carolina, the Fight Over the Drawing of Congressional District Lines Appears to Have Come to an End

On Monday a panel of judges ruled that the latest congressional map, which was drawn by the Republican controlled legislature, will stand for the 2020 election.

Georgia Governor Clashes With Trump Over Interim Senator Pick

Kemp’s choice of businesswoman Kelly Loeffler drew criticism from Republicans, because the President has expressed interest for another candidate, Georgia Congressman Doug Collins

Concerns Over Trump's U.K. Visit So Close to U.K. Election

President Trump is in London attending the NATO summit amidst concerns of his sway on upcoming elections.

Dec 04 2019

30mins

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Why the Framers Empowered Congress to Impeach the President 2019-12-03

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Why the Framers Empowered Congress to Impeach the President

With so few examples of impeachment in our history, it can become unclear what exactly impeachable conduct is, and what the framers intended with it.

When Black Critics Examine Black Art

A number of black critics have received pushback on social media for their criticism of the new film "Queen & Slim."

Unprecedented Violence and Hundreds Dead in Iran's Protests

At least 180 people were killed in a violent crackdown that resulted in Iranian security forces opening fire on unarmed protesters. 

Trump Launches Task Force to Address Crisis of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women

The National Justice Institute estimates that 84 percent of Native American women experience violence in their lifetime.

Dec 03 2019

32mins

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The Dangers of Working in Amazon Warehouses 2019-12-02

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The Dangers of Working in Amazon Warehouses

New reporting found that Amazon's average serious injury rate was more than double the national average for its industry.

Are Dating App Companies Responsible for Protecting Their Users from Sex Offenders? 

Millions of Americans are using dating apps to find love. Do the companies who own these apps have a moral or legal responsibility to screen users who are registered as sex offenders?

Dec 02 2019

28mins

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Politics with Amy Walter: The Politics of Climate Change

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Scientists have painted a bleak picture of the future if we fail to curb greenhouse gas emissions, but we’ve already started to witness the fallout of a warming planet. Politics with Amy Walter looks at the role climate change is playing across politics and at the vulnerable communities that stand to lose the most. 

Our coverage this week is part of a collaboration with 250 other media organizations called “Covering Climate Now.” 

President Donald Trump was elected in 2016 fresh off of giving campaign speeches that promised to withdraw the U.S. from the Paris Climate Agreement and bring back coal jobs. Just over two years later, we look at whether or not he's made good on those promises.

Guests:

Rachel Cleetus, Policy director with the Climate and Energy program at the Union of Concerned Scientists

Kendra Pierre-Louis, Climate reporter for The New York Times

Christine Todd Whitman, Former Governor of New Jersey and Former Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency

Zahra Hirji, Climate reporter for BuzzFeed News

Rich Fitzgerald, County Executive (D) for Allegheny County, Pennsylvania

Leandra Mira, Pittsburgh climate activist

Comment from Shell:

"Shell received its Air Quality Permit in 2015 from the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, with oversight from the Federal Environmental Protection Agency.  In line with its permitting requirements, Shell will meet the regulatory standards created to protect people and the environment."

Nov 29 2019

44mins

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How Will Bloomberg News Cover Bloomberg the Candidate? 2019-11-27

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How Will Bloomberg News Cover Bloomberg the Candidate?

Mike Bloomberg announced he is running for president and some are worried about how Bloomberg News will cover his candidacy.

Adding Indigenous Ingredients to the Thanksgiving Table

There has been a resurgence of dishes championed by Native American and indigenous cooks and chefs that are breaking into the mainstream.

How the Alcatraz Occupation of 1969 Sparked the Native American Civil Rights Movement

Fifty years ago this month, a group of Native American activists launched a 19-month occupation of Alcatraz Island in the San Francisco Bay.

Is Thanksgiving a Time for Speaking Out, or Keeping the Peace?

With the impeachment proceedings dominating the news, the Democratic candidates campaigning and debating, this year, it seems impossible to avoid politics.

Continuing Concerns About Political Ads on Social Media

Twitter announced it was banning political ads. But Facebook has continued to take a more hands-off approach.

Nov 27 2019

28mins

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New Initiative Seeks to Bridge Prosecution Empathy Gap 2019-11-26

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New Initiative Seeks to Bridge Prosecution Empathy Gap

A new initiative signed by 40 progressive district attorneys pledges to have prosecutors visit correctional centers in an effort to instill more empathy in the sentencing process.

Sentencing of School Shooter Reignites Conversation About Life Without Parole for Juveniles

The United States is the only country in the world that sentences juveniles to life in prison.

The American Plastics Renaissance: Big Oil's Plan B 

The expansion of fracking in the U.S. has paved the way for a renaissance in American plastics manufacturing.

When You're Over 50 in Hollywood

The Good Liar, a thriller released earlier this month, stars septuagenarians Ian McKellen as a con artist and Helen Mirren as his target.

Nov 26 2019

32mins

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Trump's Recent Pardons Cause Rift within the Military 2019-11-25

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Trump's Recent Pardons Cause Rift within the Military

President Donald Trump recently pardoned three military officers who were convicted or accused of war crimes. 

The Decline of Local News

In the past 15 years, more than 2,000 newspapers have shuttered across the United States. 

What does the future hold for Israeli politics?

With Prime Minister Netanyahu being indicted on corruption charges as the U.S. reverses its stance on the illegality of Israeli settlements, what's in store for Israeli politics?  

Why Disabled Workers Can Get Paid Less Than Minimum Wage

Most Americans might not know that federal law allows certain employers to pay people with disabilities far less than the minimum wage, trapping them in poverty.

Nov 25 2019

28mins

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Politics with Amy Walter: The Divided States of Government

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Not that long ago, state government was seen as one of the last places for functional governing. But, over the last 10 years, state politics have become as polarized as Washington, DC. 

At the same time, 2020 Democratic candidates for president are debating which approach they should take to governing. Some, like former Vice President Joe Biden, argue that voters want a return to a more pragmatic style of governing. Senators Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders are less interested in bringing GOP legislators to the table than they are in bringing a grass-roots revolution to Washington. 

Wisconsin State Senator Janet Bewley joins us to discuss what it's like to govern in the minority. Governing reporter Alan Greenblatt weighs in about how state legislatures have become increasingly entrenched in party politics. 

Political analysts Joel Payne and Ty Mastdrof join us for analysis of the last debate. Plus, New York Times congressional reporter Nick Fandos fills us in on the latest surrounding the impeachment inquiry.

Nov 22 2019

48mins

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Two More Witnesses Testify at Public Hearings 2019-11-21

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Two More Witnesses Testify at Public Hearings

Fiona Hill, the former top Russia adviser to the Trump White House, and David Holmes, a political counselor at the U.S. Embassy in Ukraine, are at Capitol Hill this morning. 

The Legacy of Pay-to-Play Ambassador Appointments

President Donald Trump has raised some eyebrows over his nominees for cushy ambassadorships abroad.

HBCU's and Other Minority-Serving Institutions Set to Lose $255 Million in Funding Over D.C. Deadlock

The Department of Education says funding will go through for the rest of the year but planning for next year is stalled amid concerns that programs will be cut and staff laid off.

Indigenous Communities Get Unequal Recovery Aid After a Natural Disaster

U.S. citizens on average receive $26 per person from the federal government, but tribal citizens only get about $3 per person, per year.

Nov 21 2019

37mins

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Sondland Testimony Implicates Key Trump Administration Officials 2019-11-20

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Sondland Testimony Implicates Key Trump Administration Officials

Gordon Sondland, the former ambassador to the European Union, gave riveting testimony today in the impeachment hearing that has rocked the nations.  

The Legacy of Julian Assange

Yesterday, Swedish prosecutors dropped their investigation of rape and sexual assault allegations against Julian Assange.

99% of Native American Languages are in Danger of Going Extinct 

Despite efforts to preserve them, many indigenous languages in the United States are at risk of going extinct.

Nearly Two Thousand Dams at Risk for Failure in the U.S.

An investigation from the Associated Press found that almost 1,700 dams pose potential risk for failure in 44 states and Puerto Rico. 

Racism Pushed Chinese Americans to Leave the U.S. En Masse in the 20th Century

During a time that people flocked to the U.S. for a better life, second and third generation Chinese Americans chose to leave and pursue the same dream in China.  

Nov 20 2019

49mins

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Here Comes the Second Round of Public Impeachment Hearings 2019-11-19

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Here Comes the Second Round of Public Impeachment Hearings

The House Intelligence Committee will hear testimony from eight more witnesses over the next three days.

As Impeachment Hearings Go On, a War Rages In Ukraine

The military aid that was the subject of President Trump's call with President Zelensky foretells the larger conflict happening in the eastern block.

EPA to Limit Science Used for Public Health Regulations

The EPA plans to adopt a new rule that would limit the scientific and medical research the government uses for public health regulations. 

Leaked Documents Provide New Insight into China's Crackdown on Ethnic Minorities

An investigation from the New York Times unveiled new insight into China’s mass detention of as many as a million ethnic minorities in the western region of Xinjiang.

Nov 19 2019

41mins

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Mormon Deaths In Mexico Reignite Questions About the Ongoing Drug War 2019-11-18

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Mormon Deaths In Mexico Reignite Questions About the Ongoing Drug War

Mexico and the United States are in an embittered battle with drug cartels, but some are calling into question its effectiveness as well as the media coverage. 

Mark Ruffalo and Todd Haynes Tackle Corporate Corruption in 'Dark Waters'

Actor Mark Ruffalo and director Todd Haynes sit down with The Takeaway to discuss bringing the true story of a decades-long legal fight against chemical giant DuPont.

New Study Shows Two Million Americans Lack Access to Running Water and Toilet

As federal investment in the U.S.'s water infrastructure continues to shrink, the scope of this crisis is projected to grow.

Despite Trump's Efforts, Louisiana Re-Elects Democratic Governor

This weekend, Louisiana residents re-elected incumbent governor John Bel Edwards.

Nov 18 2019

39mins

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Politics with Amy Walter: The Impeachment Will be Televised

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This week marked a shift in the ongoing impeachment inquiry as the first round of televised testimony began on Wednesday. Marie Yovanovitch, the well-respected former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine until May of this year became the third televised testimony on Friday. Yovanovitch believes she was removed from her post by President Trump because as she sees it, she was impeding his - and Rudy Guiliani’s - personal political agenda.  

While the televised inquiry didn't reveal much new information, it provided an opportunity for those watching from home to hear from long-time government civil servants involved in Ukrainian foreign policy. Amanda Terkel from HuffPost and Anita Kumar from Politico join Politics with Amy Walter to discuss the latest on impeachment. Pollster Kristen Soltis Anderson weighs in on public opinion surrounding the President and the inquiry.

Barbara Perry of the University of Virginia's Miller Center describes how social media and the 24-hour news cycle changes how Americans metabolize impeachment. Alan Frumin walks us through the rules that govern impeachment proceedings. 

Nov 15 2019

46mins

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The Divide Within The State Department 2019-11-14

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The Divide Within The State Department

Wednesday's public impeachment hearings saw the Trump administration take a two tracked-approach to foreign policy on Ukraine.

What Evo Morales's Resignation Means for Bolivia

President Evo Morales, the first indigenous leader of Bolivia, has stepped down following allegations of election fraud.

'Lionheart' Oscar Snub: A Consequence of Imperialism?

The disqualification of the Nigerian film "Lionheart" from the Best International Feature Film category has ignited a conversation about the history of colonialism.

Two Monumental Cases are Being Argued at the Supreme Court

This week, while all eyes have been focused on the impeachment hearings in the House, two monumental cases are being argued at the Supreme Court.

Nov 14 2019

29mins

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Day 1 of the Public Impeachment Hearings 2019-11-13

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Day 1 of the Public Impeachment Hearings 

The House of Representatives kicks off the first round of televised impeachment hearings.

Trump Plans to Shrink the National Security Council

These latest changes to the NSC come right in the middle of impeachment proceedings against President Trump.

Nov 13 2019

29mins

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Public Impeachment Hearings Pose New Challenge for the Media 2019-11-12

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Public Impeachment Hearings Pose New Challenge for the Media

On Wednesday, televised impeachment hearings begin in the House of Representatives.

Flint Water Crisis Finds Its Way into the Classroom

It’s been five years since the Flint water crisis was thrust into the national spotlight.

How Universities are Addressing Slavery and Reparations

Georgetown, Princeton Theological Seminary, and Virginia Theological Seminary are creating scholarships, while Harvard, Yale, and Brown have admitted to benefiting from the slave trade.

Nov 12 2019

37mins

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Politics with Amy Walter: What Did Democrats Get Wrong About Religious Voters in 2016?

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A recent study from Pew Research found that white people who identify as Christians represent about two-thirds of all Republicans. Meanwhile, Americans unaffiliated with any religion, and racial minorities who identify as Christians, now each make up a bigger share of the Democratic coalition. This week, we take a look at how people of faith are balancing their religious beliefs with politics.

The Atlantic's Emma Green explains what Democrats misunderstood about religious voters in 2016. Reverend Joe Darby of Nichols Chapel AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina talks to us about what he's hearing from his congregation in the early-primary state. Pastor Bart Barber of First Baptist Church in Farmersville, Texas joins us to discuss Evangelical support for President Trump in 2016. Doug Pagitt, pastor and executive director of Vote Common Good, discusses his campaign to ask Evangelicals and Christians to consider Democratic candidates. 

Finally, Congresswoman Elaine Luria of Virginia's second district joins us to discuss the ongoing impeachment inquiry and the implications of televised testimony. 

Nov 08 2019

45mins

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How a Florida County Followed Trump's Call to Cancel "Fake News" 2019-11-07

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How a Florida County Followed Trump's Call to Cancel "Fake News"

The board of commissioners for Citrus County, Florida recently rejected a library's request to renew its New York Times subscription, with one commissioner calling the daily "fake news."

Is the Term "Latinx" Unifying, or Divisive?

One term that recently made its way into the demographic lexicon is getting lots of attention, and pushback: Latinx.

How Law Enforcement Discretion Prevents Migrant Victims of Crime from Accessing U-Visas

A new Reveal investigation shows the complexities of the U-Visa process.

Could New Evidence Free Death Row Inmate Rodney Reed?

Rodney Reed has spent two decades on death row for a murder he maintains he did not commit. New evidence has led to urgent calls to give him a reprieve.

Nov 07 2019

30mins

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OK Boomer and the Generational Divide 2019-11-06

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OK Boomer and the Generational Divide

Those two words have become the latest catchphrase for a younger generation expressing its frustration with their older counterparts. 

Democrats Win Control In Kentucky

Andy Bashear won a tight vote against opponent incumbent Republican Matt Bevin.

Mississippi Gubernatorial Race Highlights a Jim Crow-Era Electoral Law

A tight gubernatorial race Mississippi ignites a conversation about the states electoral process.

Are 'Opportunity Zone' Tax Breaks a Giveaway For the Rich?

Roughly 12 percent of census tracts around the country are being reclassified as opportunity zones, including almost all of Puerto Rico. 

Nov 06 2019

27mins

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