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(467)

Rank #49 in Science category

Technology
Science

Nature Podcast

Updated 4 days ago

Rank #49 in Science category

Technology
Science
Read more

The Nature Podcast brings you the best stories from the world of science each week. We cover everything from astronomy to zoology, highlighting the most exciting research from each issue of Nature journal. We meet the scientists behind the results and providing in-depth analysis from Nature's journalists and editors.

Read more

The Nature Podcast brings you the best stories from the world of science each week. We cover everything from astronomy to zoology, highlighting the most exciting research from each issue of Nature journal. We meet the scientists behind the results and providing in-depth analysis from Nature's journalists and editors.

iTunes Ratings

467 Ratings
Average Ratings
369
52
19
13
14

Informative

By Organa57 - Jul 08 2018
Read more
A fun, interesting way to keep up with some of what’s going on in the science world.

Billc60

By Billc60 - Jun 21 2018
Read more
My favorite podcast. Funny interesting and informative.

iTunes Ratings

467 Ratings
Average Ratings
369
52
19
13
14

Informative

By Organa57 - Jul 08 2018
Read more
A fun, interesting way to keep up with some of what’s going on in the science world.

Billc60

By Billc60 - Jun 21 2018
Read more
My favorite podcast. Funny interesting and informative.

Listen to:

Cover image of Nature Podcast

Nature Podcast

Updated 4 days ago

Read more

The Nature Podcast brings you the best stories from the world of science each week. We cover everything from astronomy to zoology, highlighting the most exciting research from each issue of Nature journal. We meet the scientists behind the results and providing in-depth analysis from Nature's journalists and editors.

Nature Podcast: 17 November 2016

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This week, your brain on cannabis, testing CRISPR in a human, and what it might be like to live on Mars. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Nov 16 2016

19mins

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Nature Podcast: 16 June 2016

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This week, pimping proteins, adapting enzymes, and conserving coral reefs. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Jun 15 2016

29mins

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Nature Podcast: 21 May 2015

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The oldest stone tools yet found, making opiates from yeast and sugar, and the perks of sex… for beetles. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

May 20 2015

27mins

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Nature Podcast: 28 July 2016

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This week, how we time our breathing, working with indigenous peoples, and using yeast genetics to build better beer. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Jul 27 2016

26mins

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Nature Podcast: 22 December 2016

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It’s our bumper end-of-year show, with a 2016 round-up, holiday reading picks, science carols, word games and more.   For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Dec 21 2016

38mins

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Nature Podcast: 2 February 2017

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Bird beaks show how evolution shifts gear, getting to Proxima b, and have physicists made metallic hydrogen?   For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Feb 01 2017

29mins

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Audiofile: In search of lost sound

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Are the sounds of the past lost forever? In the 1960s, an American engineer proposed that sound could be recorded into clay pots and paintings as they were created. This episode explores the science behind resurrecting the sounds of the past. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

May 26 2015

23mins

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Nature Extra: Futures February 2017

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Futures is Nature's weekly science fiction slot. Shamini Bundell and Richard Hodson read you their favourite from February, 'Fermi's zookeepers' by David Gullen. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Feb 27 2017

4mins

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26 April 2018: Mini brains, and an updated enzyme image

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This week, the ethical questions raised by model minds, and an updated view on an enzyme that keeps chromosomes protected.

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Apr 25 2018

20mins

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Nature Extra: Futures October 2016

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Futures is Nature's weekly science fiction slot. Shamini Bundell reads you her favourite from October, ’The sixth circle' by J. W. Armstrong. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Oct 31 2016

8mins

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Nature Podcast: 30 October 2014

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This week, the most highly cited papers of all time, NASA’s plans to fetch an asteroid need a rethink, and we profile the first lady of science writing. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Oct 29 2014

27mins

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24 October 2019: Quantum supremacy and ancient mammals

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This week, a milestone in quantum computing, and rethinking early mammals.


In this episode:


00:43 A quantum computing milestone

A quantum computer is reported to have achieved ‘quantum supremacy’ – performing an operation that’s essentially impossible for classical computers. 

Research Article: Arute et al.News and Views: Quantum computing takes flightEditorial: A precarious milestone for quantum computingNews: Hello quantum world! Google publishes landmark quantum supremacy claim


08:24 Research Highlights

The world’s speediest ants, and the world’s loudest birdsong. 

Research Highlight: A land-speed record for ants set in Saharan dunesResearch Highlight: A bird’s ear-splitting shriek smashes the record for loudest song


10:19 The mammals that lived with the dinosaurs

Paleontologists are shifting their view of the Mesozoic era mammals. 

News Feature: How the earliest mammals thrived alongside dinosaurs


18:00 News Chat

A Russian researcher’s plans to edit human embryos, and ‘prime editing’ - a more accurate gene editing system. 

News: Russian ‘CRISPR-baby’ scientist has started editing genes in human eggs with goal of altering deaf geneNews: Super-precise new CRISPR tool could tackle a plethora of genetic diseases

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Oct 23 2019

26mins

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Nature Podcast: 23 February 2017

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This week, highlights from AAAS, the new epigenetics, and a new way to conduct biomedical research For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Feb 22 2017

28mins

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Nature Podcast: 4 May 2017

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This week, the secret life of the thalamus, how to talks about antibiotic resistance, and dangerous research. Survey link: https://podcastsurvey.typeform.com/to/RmZVDI

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May 03 2017

28mins

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Nature Podcast: 9 February 2017

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This week, free-floating DNA in cancers, an ancient relative of molluscs and can the Arctic’s ice be regrown? For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Feb 08 2017

31mins

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Nature Podcast: 19 January 2017

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This week, communication between viruses, reproducing cancer studies, and explaining ‘fairy circles’. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Jan 18 2017

30mins

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Nature Podcast: 12 February 2015

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This week, sequencing the genomes of Darwin's finches, financial trading nears light speed, and an ancient book of optics. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Feb 11 2015

29mins

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REBROADCAST: Nature PastCast - November 1869

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The first issue of Nature looked very different from today's magazine. It opened with poetry and was written for a general audience. We hear how Nature began, and how it became the iconic science journal it is today. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Nov 11 2016

13mins

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Nature Podcast: 8 December 2016

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This week, the benefits of randomness, correcting brain waves soothes Alzheimer’s, and the DNA of liberated slaves. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Dec 07 2016

30mins

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Nature Podcast: 28 May 2015

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This week, the ethics of killer robots, laser weapons become a reality, and the subtleties of temperature. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

May 27 2015

25mins

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12 December 2019: Social priming, and acoustic science

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We recently launched our 2019 listener survey. We want to hear your views on the show to help us make it even better, so please help us by filling in the survey, thanks!


In this episode:


00:45 What’s next for social priming?

How might a branch of psychological research move forward in the face of replication failures? News Feature: What’s next for psychology’s embattled field of social priming


08:55 Research Highlights

Killer-whale grandmothers help their grandchildren survive, and the failed voyage of a reproduced ancient raft. Research Highlight: Why female orcas make killer grandmasResearch Highlight: On a model ancient raft, seafarers are up the current without a paddle


11:12 The sounds of science

We hear the latest updates from the Acoustical Society of America's recent conference.


18:44 News Chat

Reassessing when civilisations moved to modernity, and understanding exoplanets. News: When did societies become modern? ‘Big history’ dashes popular idea of Axial AgeNews: European space telescope to launch new era of exoplanet science

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Dec 11 2019

27mins

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05 December 2019: Genomic sequencing and the source of solar winds

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We recently launched our 2019 listener survey. We want to hear your views on the show to help us make it even better. You can find the survey here. Thanks!


In this episode:

00:45 The GenomeAsia 100k project

Researchers have released the first data from an ambitious project to sequence the genomes of 100,000 people from populations across Asia. Research Article: GenomeAsia100K Consortium

08:56 Research Highlights

Bare riverbanks make meanders move, and human activity affects picky penguins. Research Highlight: The meandering rivers that speed across barren landscapes; Research Highlight: Climate change splits two penguin species into winners and losers

11:18 Curbing the rise in genetic surveillance

Concerns are growing around the use of commercial DNA databases for state-level surveillance. Comment: Crack down on genomic surveillance


20:02 News Chat

NASA’s Parker Solar Probe has sent back the most detailed information yet about the birthplace of solar wind. News: Sun-bombing spacecraft uncovers secrets of the solar wind


 

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Dec 04 2019

28mins

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Nature Pastcast, November 1869: The first issue of Nature

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This year, Nature celebrates its 150th birthday. To mark this anniversary we’re rebroadcasting episodes from our PastCast series, highlighting key moments in the history of science.


In this episode, we’re heading back to 4 November 1869, when Nature’s story began. The first issue of the journal looked very different from the way it does now and, to the dismay of the editor, it was not immediately popular. In this podcast, we hear how Nature began, and how it became the journal it is today.


From the archive

Nature 4 November 1869

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Nov 29 2019

13mins

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28 November 2019: Nature’s 2019 PhD survey, and older women in sci-fi novels

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This week, delving into the results of the latest graduate student survey, and assessing ageism in science fiction literature.

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Nov 27 2019

24mins

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21 November 2019: A new antibiotic from nematode guts, grant funding ‘lotteries’, and butterfly genomes

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This week, an antibiotic that targets hard-to-treat bacteria, and a roundup of the latest science news.


In this episode:


00:49 Discovering darobactin

Researchers looked inside nematode guts and have identified a new antibiotic with some useful properties. Research Article: Imai et al.


05:45 Research Highlights

Using urine as a health metric, and sniffing out book decay with an electronic nose. Research Article: Miller et al.Research Article: Veríssimo et al.


07:54 News Chat

Adding an element of chance to grant funding, a continental butterfly-sequencing project, and tracking endangered animals via traces of their DNA. News: Science funders gamble on grant lotteriesNews: Every butterfly in the United States and Canada now has a genome sequenceNews: Rare bird’s detection highlights promise of ‘environmental DNA’

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Nov 20 2019

18mins

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14 November 2019: A rapid, multi-material 3D printer, and a bacterium’s role in alcoholic hepatitis

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This week, a new 3D printer allows quick shifting between many materials, and understanding the link between gut microbes and liver disease.


00:46 A new dimension for 3D printers

A new nozzle lets a 3D printer switch between materials at a rapid rate, opening the door to a range of applications. Research Article: Skylar-Scott et al.News and Views: How to print multi-material devices in one go


08:07 Research Highlights

The slippery secrets of ice, and cells wrapping up their nuclei. Research Highlight: Viscous water holds the secret to an ice skater’s smooth glideResearch Highlight: Super-thin layer of ‘bubble wrap’ cushions a cell’s nucleus


10:17 Linking bacteria to liver disease

Researchers have isolated a bacterial strain that appears to play an important role in alcoholic liver disease. Research paper: Duan et al.News and Views: Microbial clues to a liver disease


17:10 News Chat

‘Megaconstellations’ of satellites concern astronomers, and a report on the gender gap in chemistry. News: SpaceX launch highlights threat to astronomy from ‘megaconstellations’News: Huge study documents gender gap in chemistry publishing

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Nov 13 2019

23mins

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Backchat: Nature's 150th anniversary

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This week marks 150 years since the first issue of Nature was published, on 4 November 1869. In this anniversary edition of Backchat, the panel take a look back at how the journal has evolved in this time, and discuss the role that Nature can play in today's society. The panel also pick a few of their favourite research papers that Nature has published, and think about where science might be headed in the next 150 years.


Collection: 150 years of Nature

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Nov 07 2019

17mins

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07 November 2019: The fossil of an upright ape, science in 150 years, and immunization progress around the world

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This week, insights into the evolution of walking upright, how science needs to change in the next 150 years, and the unfinished agenda for vaccines.


In this episode:


00:50 Early ape locomotion

The discovery of a fossil of a new species of ape gives new insights on how bipedalism may have evolved. Research Article: Böhme et al.News and Views: Fossil ape hints at how walking on two feet evolvedNews: Fossil ape offers clues to evolution of walking on two feet


07:24 Research Highlights

Women lacking olfactory bulbs can somehow still smell, and telling whiskies apart through evaporation patterns. Research Highlight: The women who lack an odour-related brain area — and can still smell a roseResearch Highlight: Bourbon or Scotch? A droplet’s dynamics reveal the truth


09:44 How should science evolve?

This year is Nature’s 150th anniversary. Science has made huge strides during this time, but what needs to change to continue this progress for the next 150 years? Comment: Science must move with the times


17:52 The state of vaccination in 2019

Researchers assess the differences in immunization levels worldwide and identify the bottlenecks in developing new vaccines. Research article: Piot et al.


23:54 News Chat

An AI figures out the sun’s place in the Solar System, and reassessing the size of the proton. News article: AI Copernicus: Neural network ‘discovers’ that Earth orbits the Sun; News: Puzzle over size of proton leaps closer to resolution

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Nov 06 2019

31mins

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Nature Pastcast, October 1993: Carl Sagan uses Galileo to search for signs of life

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This year, Nature celebrates its 150th birthday. To mark this anniversary we’re rebroadcasting episodes from our PastCast series, highlighting key moments in the history of science.


In the early 1990s, a team of astrophysicists led by Carl Sagan looked at data from the Galileo spacecraft and saw the signatures of life on a planet in our galaxy. Historian of science David Kaiser and astrobiologists Charles Cockell and Frank Drake discuss how we can tell if there is life beyond the Earth – and how optimism, as well as science, is necessary for such a venture.


This episode was first broadcast in October 2013.

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Oct 31 2019

13mins

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31 October 2019: An AI masters the video game StarCraft II, and measuring arthropod abundance

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This week, a computer beats the best human players in StarCraft II, and a huge study of insects and other arthropods.


In this episode:


00:45 Learning to play

By studying and experimenting, an AI has reached Grandmaster level at the video game Starcraft II.

Research Article: Vinyals et al.News Article: Google AI beats experienced human players at real-time strategy game StarCraft II


10:08 Research Highlights

A record-breaking lightning bolt, and identifying our grey matter’s favourite tunes

Research Highlight: Here come the lightning ‘megaflashes’Research Highlight: Why some songs delight the human brain


12:24 Arthropods in decline

Researchers have surveyed how land-use change has affected arthropod diversity. 

Research article: Seibold et al.


18:30 News Chat

Young Canadians file a lawsuit against their government, an Alzheimer’s drug gets a second chance, and South Korean efforts to curb a viral epidemic in pigs. 

News: Canadian kids sue government over climate changeNews: Fresh push for ‘failed’ Alzheimer’s drugNews: South Korea deploys snipers and drones to fend off deadly pig virus

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Oct 30 2019

24mins

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Podcast Extra: Detecting gravitational waves

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As part of Nature's 150th anniversary celebrations, we look back at an important moment in the history of science.



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Oct 28 2019

10mins

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24 October 2019: Quantum supremacy and ancient mammals

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This week, a milestone in quantum computing, and rethinking early mammals.


In this episode:


00:43 A quantum computing milestone

A quantum computer is reported to have achieved ‘quantum supremacy’ – performing an operation that’s essentially impossible for classical computers. 

Research Article: Arute et al.News and Views: Quantum computing takes flightEditorial: A precarious milestone for quantum computingNews: Hello quantum world! Google publishes landmark quantum supremacy claim


08:24 Research Highlights

The world’s speediest ants, and the world’s loudest birdsong. 

Research Highlight: A land-speed record for ants set in Saharan dunesResearch Highlight: A bird’s ear-splitting shriek smashes the record for loudest song


10:19 The mammals that lived with the dinosaurs

Paleontologists are shifting their view of the Mesozoic era mammals. 

News Feature: How the earliest mammals thrived alongside dinosaurs


18:00 News Chat

A Russian researcher’s plans to edit human embryos, and ‘prime editing’ - a more accurate gene editing system. 

News: Russian ‘CRISPR-baby’ scientist has started editing genes in human eggs with goal of altering deaf geneNews: Super-precise new CRISPR tool could tackle a plethora of genetic diseases

For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Oct 23 2019

26mins

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17 October 2019: Mapping childhood mortality, and evolving ‘de novo’ genes

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This week, investigating child mortality rates at a local level, and building genes from non-coding DNA.


In this episode:


00:43 A regional view of childhood mortality

Researchers map countries' progress towards the UN’s Sustainable Developmental Goals. 

Research Article: Burstein et al.World View: Data on child deaths are a call for justiceEditorial: Protect the census


07:22 Research Highlights

Astronomers identify a second visitor from beyond the solar system, and extreme snowfall stifles animal breeding in Greenland. 

Research Highlight: The comet that came in from interstellar spaceResearch Highlight: Extreme winter leads to an Arctic reproductive collapse


09:22 Evolving genes from the ground up

Natural selection's creative way to evolve new genes. 

News Feature: How evolution builds genes from scratch


15:43 News Chat

A spate of vaping-related deaths in the US, and Japan’s import of the Ebola virus. 

News: Scientists chase cause of mysterious vaping illness as death toll risesNews: Why Japan imported Ebola ahead of the 2020 Olympics

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Oct 16 2019

24mins

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10 October 2019: Estimating earthquake risk, and difficulties for deep-learning

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This week, a method for predicting follow-up earthquakes, and the issues with deep learning systems in AI.


In this episode:


00:47 Which is the big quake?

A new technique could allow seismologists to better predict if a larger earthquake will follow an initial tremor. 

Research Article: Real-time discrimination of earthquake foreshocks and aftershocksNews and Views: Predicting if the worst earthquake has passed


07:46 Research Highlights

Vampire bats transmitting rabies in Costa Rica, and why are some octopuses warty? 

Research Article: Streicker et al.Research Article: Voight et al.


10:03 Problems for pattern-recognition

Deep-learning allows AIs to better understand the world, but the technique is not without its issues. 

News Feature: Why deep-learning AIs are so easy to fool


16:31 News Chat

We roundup the 2019 Nobel Prizes for science. 

News: Biologists who decoded how cells sense oxygen win medicine NobelNews: Physics Nobel goes to exoplanet and cosmology pioneersNews: Chemistry Nobel honours world-changing batteries

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Oct 09 2019

23mins

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Podcast Extra: Q&A with Nobel Prize winner John B Goodenough

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In this Podcast Extra, we speak to John B Goodenough, from the University of Texas at Austin, in the US. Today, John was announced as one of the joint winners of the 2019 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Reporter Benjamin Thompson went along to the Royal Society in London to chat with him.

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Oct 09 2019

4mins

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Podcast Extra: Q&A with Nobel Prize winner Didier Queloz

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In this Podcast Extra, we speak to physicist Didier Queloz, who was announced today as one of the joint winners of the 2019 Nobel Prize in Physics. Shortly after the winners were announced, Didier took part in a press conference to talk about his award. Reporter Benjamin Thompson went along to chat with him.

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Oct 08 2019

8mins

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03 October 2019: Leapfrogging speciation, and migrating mosquitoes

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This week, how new species may form by sexual imprinting, and a previously unknown way for mosquitoes to migrate.


In this episode:


00:43 New species by sexual imprinting?

A Central American frog chooses mates resembling its parents, a possible route for new species to form. 

Research Article: Yang et al.News and Views: Leapfrog to speciation boosted by mother’s influence


09:58 Research Highlights

A light-based pacemaker, and the mathematics of the best place to park. 

Research Article: Mei et al.Research Highlight: Maths tackles an eternal question: where to park?


11:43 Gone with the wind

Researchers show that malaria mosquitoes may travel hundreds of kilometres using wind currents. 

Research Article: Huestis et al.News and Views: Malaria mosquitoes go with the flow


19:28 News Chat

Eradication of Guinea Worm pushed back, and researchers report ‘pressure to cite’. 

News: Exclusive: Battle to wipe out debilitating Guinea worm parasite hits 10 year delayNews: Two-thirds of researchers report ‘pressure to cite’ in Nature poll

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Oct 02 2019

25mins

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Nature PastCast, September 1963: Plate tectonics – the unifying theory of Earth sciences

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This year, Nature celebrates its 150th birthday. To mark this anniversary we’re rebroadcasting episodes from our PastCast series, highlighting key moments in the history of science.


Earthquakes, volcanoes, the formation of mountains; we understand all these phenomena in terms of plate tectonics (large-scale movements of the Earth’s crust). But when a German geologist first suggested that continents move, in the 1910s, people dismissed it as a wild idea. In this podcast, we hear how a ‘wild idea’ became the unifying theory of Earth sciences. In the 1960s, data showed that the sea floor was spreading, pushing continents apart. Fred Vine recalls the reaction when he published these findings in Nature.


This episode was first broadcast in September 2013.


From the archive


Magnetic Anomalies Over Oceanic Ridges, by Vine & Matthews

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Sep 27 2019

15mins

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26 September 2019: Mysteries of the ancient mantle, and the Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy

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This week, diamond-containing rocks may help uncover secrets of the Earth’s mantle, and a reflection on science since the Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy was published.


In this episode:


00:46 Earth’s Evolution

Explosive eruptions have allowed researchers to study Earth’s mysterious mantle. 

Research Article: Woodhead et al.News and Views: Enigmatic origin of diamond-bearing rocks revealed


06:08 Research Highlights

Supersonic cork popping, and the timing of vaccines. 

Research Highlight: An uncorked champagne bottle imitates a fighter jetResearch Highlight: Why midday might be a golden hour for vaccinations


07:53 Don’t Panic

40 years since the publication of the ‘Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy’ we reflect on how far science has come.


15:22 News Chat

A huge telescope with exquisite sensitivity is opening in China, and gene-editing to save bananas. News: Gigantic Chinese telescope opens to astronomers worldwideNews: CRISPR might be the banana’s only hope against a deadly fungus

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Sep 25 2019

23mins

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Podcast Extra: Absurd scientific advice

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How To: Absurd Scientific Advice for Common Real-World Problems is the new book from XKCD cartoonist Randall Munroe. In this Podcast Extra, Randall talks about the book, its inspiration and the bizarre thought experiments it contains.

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Sep 21 2019

15mins

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