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Rank #52 in Philosophy category

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Aspen Ideas to Go

Updated about 1 month ago

Rank #52 in Philosophy category

Society & Culture
Philosophy
News
Politics
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Aspen Ideas to Go is a show about big ideas that will open your mind. Featuring compelling conversations with the world’s top thinkers and doers from a diverse range of disciplines, Aspen Ideas to Go gives you front-row access to the Aspen Ideas Festival and other events presented by the Aspen Institute.

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Aspen Ideas to Go is a show about big ideas that will open your mind. Featuring compelling conversations with the world’s top thinkers and doers from a diverse range of disciplines, Aspen Ideas to Go gives you front-row access to the Aspen Ideas Festival and other events presented by the Aspen Institute.

iTunes Ratings

163 Ratings
Average Ratings
102
29
11
11
10

Universe

By Digiverse - Feb 22 2020
Read more
Cool!! I do wish that they would make a podcast about the multiverse and more about black holes!

Great podcast a must subscription!

By Traveling RPh - Oct 27 2016
Read more
Great thought provoking discussion on timely issues!

iTunes Ratings

163 Ratings
Average Ratings
102
29
11
11
10

Universe

By Digiverse - Feb 22 2020
Read more
Cool!! I do wish that they would make a podcast about the multiverse and more about black holes!

Great podcast a must subscription!

By Traveling RPh - Oct 27 2016
Read more
Great thought provoking discussion on timely issues!
Cover image of Aspen Ideas to Go

Aspen Ideas to Go

Latest release on Jul 08, 2020

Read more

Aspen Ideas to Go is a show about big ideas that will open your mind. Featuring compelling conversations with the world’s top thinkers and doers from a diverse range of disciplines, Aspen Ideas to Go gives you front-row access to the Aspen Ideas Festival and other events presented by the Aspen Institute.

Rank #1: Millennials and Motivation, Featuring Simon Sinek and Adam Grant

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Millennials shoulder a lot of stereotypes. They’re called entitled and in need of instant gratification. They’re not committed to their work and expect a work-life balance at their very first job. Do these labels actually define them? Are they really any different than the generations before them? In this lighthearted and informative conversation, organizational psychologist Adam Grant and inspirational teacher Simon Sinek sit down with Katie Couric. Couric is an award-winning journalist. They explore what motivates Millennials at work and how the digital world is impacting their productivity.

Aug 01 2017

1hr 3mins

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Rank #2: The Choices That Create Your Life

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New York Times columnist David Brooks explores a life well lived. In this episode he examines happiness and commitments. In his book The Road to Character, he studies people who radiate an inner light. What work did they do to reach higher levels of happiness? A successful life usually depends on making four major commitments: to spouse or family, a faith or philosophy, a community, and a vocation. How do we choose what we will commit to, and how do we execute those commitments?

Nov 29 2016

47mins

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Rank #3: How to Learn Anything Fast

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Best-selling author of "The First 20 Hours: How to Learn Anything Fast!" Josh Kaufman shares universal, field-tested approaches to effective learning and rapid skill acquisition in adults. From deconstructing complex skills to maximizing productive practice and removing common learning barriers, Kaufman describes how 20 hours of focused, deliberate practice can help you develop surprising levels of skill in any field. And, he may even play his Ukulele.

(music bed: Podington Bear/Golden Hour)

Apr 27 2016

56mins

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Rank #4: Crash Course on Happiness

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The number of college students dealing with stress, depression, and anxiety is growing. Psychology professor Laurie Santos noticed it in her Yale classroom and set out to change the campus culture. Her course “Psychology and the Good Life” is the most popular class in Yale’s 300-year history. In this episode, she talks about her efforts to infuse wellness into her students’ lives. She gives a crash course on how to feel less stressed and depressed, and find more meaning in your life. It’s applicable to everyone—whether you’re an undergraduate or a retiree.

Show Notes Register for the 2019 Aspen Ideas Festival. Follow Aspen Ideas to Go on Twitter and Facebook. Email your comments to aspenideastogo@gmail.com. The views and opinions of the speakers in the podcast do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.

Dec 31 2018

58mins

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Rank #5: The Road to Depth, Thinking about what Character Is

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Description Some people seem to lead inner lives that are richer and more substantive than the rest of us. How do they do it? In this talk, author and commentator David Brooks explores some of history's leaders in terms of personal character. He asks how love, suffering, struggle, surrender and obedience lead them to their depth. His latest book, "The Road to Character" was released on April 14, 2015. This talk, recorded last summer at the Aspen Ideas Festival, serves as a preview to many of the themes Brooks explores in the book.

Apr 27 2015

57mins

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Rank #6: A Conversation with Ruth Bader Ginsburg

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As the second female justice confirmed to the US Supreme Court, Ruth Bader Ginsburg says her experiences as a female give her a unique perspective her male colleagues don’t share. In this episode, Justice Ginsburg talks about her relationships with Justices Sandra Day O’Connor and the late Antonin Scalia. She also explains what it’s like to work with newly-elected Justice Neil Gorsuch. Her discussion with the Aspen Wye Fellows, also touches on her book My Own Words. Ginsburg is interviewed by Elliot Gerson, executive vice president of policy and public programs at the Aspen Institute.

Jun 14 2017

1hr

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Rank #7: Finding Happiness at Every Stage of Life

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Economists who have researched happiness over a lifetime find it starts to decline after adolescence and noticeably dips when people enter middle age. How can we avoid the middle age blues and feel purposeful later in life? Arthur Brooks, behavioral economist and American Enterprise Institute president, uses eastern and western philosophies, classical music, and the latest research to give usable advice on how to be joyful throughout life’s different stages. It’s inescapable that we’ll grow older, so how can we develop new strengths as our life journey progresses?

Show Notes At the Aspen Ideas Festival in June, Arthur Brooks will talk about his new book, Love Your Enemies: How Decent People Can Save America from Our Culture of Contempt. Passes to the Festival are still available. Register today! Email your comments to aspenideastogo@gmail.com. The views and opinions of the speakers in the podcast do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.

Apr 02 2019

47mins

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Rank #8: The Road to Character - David Brooks and Katie Couric

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I wrote this book not sure I could follow the road to character, but I wanted at least to know what the road looks like and how other people have trodden it, David Brooks has said about his experience writing his latest New York Times bestseller about personal virtues and honesty in a materialistic age. Katie Couric explores this journey with the deeply thoughtful author.

Jan 11 2016

58mins

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Rank #9: Finding Meaning in Our Work

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The average American spends a third of his or her life working. What is the secret to achieving happiness because of our work and not in spite of it? How can we make a job into a vocation? David Brooks and Arthur Brooks have both studied and written about these questions. They say, no matter what the job is, the answer is to find meaning in it. In this episode, the thought leaders discuss the elements of meaningful work, the ways to achieve it, and how we can use these insights to improve culture and policy.

Sep 20 2016

59mins

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Rank #10: Technology Isn’t Only Hijacking Our Time, It’s Controlling Our Choices

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Millennials check their phones 150 times a day, more than 2 billion people use Facebook, and another 2 billion use YouTube. What’s the root of our digital addiction? Tristan Harris, former Google ethicist and founder of the Center for Humane Technology, says these companies have perfected the use of persuasive technology and we’ve fallen for it. It’s a problem, says Harris, because technology has the power to modify people’s behavior, attitudes and beliefs. He tells author and journalist Charles Duhigg that persuasive technology is partly to blame for political polarization, election manipulation, and loneliness. Duhigg is the author of “The Power of Habit.”

Jun 11 2019

48mins

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Rank #11: Gray Matter: The Brain after 50

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Our brains are getting older, but there's still much to be optimistic about. Neuroscientists Susan Greenfield and Gary Small discuss the aging brain with journalist Sam Kean.

Oct 12 2015

58mins

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Rank #12: Jesus of History versus Christ of Faith

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Sifting through centuries of mythmaking, Reza Aslan sheds new light on one of history's most influential and enigmatic figures by examining Jesus within the context of the times in which he lived: the age of zealotry. Balancing the Jesus of the Gospels against historical sources, Aslan describes a man of peace who exhorted his followers to arm themselves; an exorcist and faith healer who urged his disciples to keep his identity secret; and the seditious "King of the Jews," whose promise of liberation from Rome went unfulfilled in his lifetime.

Mar 08 2016

52mins

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Rank #13: "Our Kids" author Robert D. Putnam

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A professor of public policy at Harvard, Robert D. Putnam has consulted for the last three American presidents and many other leaders around the globe. His newest book, "Our Kids: The American Dream in Crisis" is a groundbreaking examination of the growing inequality gap and explores why fewer Americans today have the opportunity for upward mobility. He has written fourteen books and been translated into more than twenty languages. His books "Bowling Alone" and "Making Democracy Work", are among the most cited publications in the social sciences in the last half century. This conversation between Putnam and Walter Isaacson, president and CEO of the Aspen Institute, was recorded live at the Institute's Alma and Joseph Gildenhorn Book Series.

Apr 13 2015

50mins

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Rank #14: Securing the Nation's Secrets

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As our lives become increasingly tech driven, we’re more vulnerable to cyberattacks, and our workplaces and government are too. William Evanina, director of the National Counterintelligence and Security Center (NCSC), says it takes a whole-of-nation counterintelligence and security effort to keep our data safe. His organization is helping lead the charge. In this episode, he talks with NPR counter-terrorism correspondent Dina Temple-Raston about why Americans easily fall prey to spear phishing attacks and how our personal information, through gadgets like baby monitors, can easily be collected. They also discuss potential Russian interference in the midterm elections, Edward Snowden, government background checks, and technology and the US supply chain.

Show Notes: Listen to the Aspen Ideas to Go episode, The Complexities of Today's Security Challenges featuring James Comey. Check out Aspen Insight's latest episode, Make Way for These Changemakers. Follow our show on Twitter @aspenideas and Facebook at facebook.com/aspenideas. Email your comments to aspenideastogo@gmail.com.

Apr 25 2018

56mins

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Rank #15: Healthy Gut, Healthy Body

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How are diet and lifestyle linked to bacterial communities in the gut? How can growing knowledge about gut health be used to develop new therapies? Researchers are learning how the gut microbiome responds to the food we eat, influencing obesity, autoimmune disorders, cardiovascular disease, and even mental health. Trillions of bacteria inhabit the human gut, working in close and complex symbiosis with our cells. Novel analytic methods offer new insights about those biochemical interactions, and help us understand how they impact well-being. When it comes to a healthy body and mind, an increasing number of people are focusing on improving bacteria in the gut.

Jan 24 2017

47mins

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Rank #16: What is College For?

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Featuring William Deresiewicz, author of 'Excellent Sheep: The Miseducation of the American Elite and the Way to a Meaningful Life' and New York Times op-ed columnist David Brooks. At a time when traditional notions of college are under attack — in the shift to online instruction, in the emphasis on STEM fields and the denigration of the liberal arts, in the continued privatization of public higher education — it is urgent that we ask what college is supposed to be about in the first place. What happens when education is understood in purely vocational terms? What happens to schools, to teachers, to society — to students themselves? Why are students learning so little in college? Why are courses so much less important to them than extracurriculars? Why do so many young people today have trouble finding a sense of purpose? What are we doing to our children, and why are we doing it?

Aug 31 2015

56mins

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Rank #17: Jeff Bezos on High Tech, Space, and Artificial Intelligence

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When Amazon launched, it employed just ten people. Now it’s one of the largest retailers in the world. CEO Jeff Bezos describes what companies need in today’s fast-paced, high tech business environment. He explains how Alexa is different from Siri and why he decided to invest in the Washington Post and an aerospace company. AOL Cofounder Steve Case, Columbia Business School Dean Glenn Hubbard, and Aspen Institute CEO Walter Isaacson are also featured. The discussions were part of Vanity Fair’s New Establishment Summit.

Nov 01 2016

1hr 1min

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Rank #18: The Evolution of Thinking Machines

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In many ways, artificial intelligence has become the norm. From autopilot on airplanes to language translation, we've come to accept once novel concepts as just something thinking machines do. What we have ultimately learned is that human thinking is just one way of thinking. So, how far will artificial intelligence go? This episode features a conversation between Danny Hillis and Alexis Madrigal. Hillis is an inventor, scientist, author and engineer. He is co-founder of Applied Minds, a research and development company that creates a range of new products and services in software, entertainment, electronics, biotechnology, and mechanical design. Madrigal is the Silicon Valley bureau chief for Fusion, where he hosts and produces a television show about the future. He is the tech critic for NPR's "FreshAir," a contributing editor at The Atlantic, and a former staff writer at Wired.

Jun 22 2015

57mins

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Rank #19: Thomas Jefferson: An American Original

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In honor of President's Day, biographer Jon Meacham explores Jefferson's complicated legacy and suggests how we might reclaim the Jeffersonian insistence that political leaders be conversant with the philosophical and cultural currents of their time. Meacham wrote the No. 1 New York Times bestseller "Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power."

Feb 09 2016

55mins

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Rank #20: Kids These Days: Technology and Culture in American Life

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What is new about how teenagers communicate through services such as Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram? Do social media affect the quality of teens’ lives? Youth culture and technology expert Danah Boyd talks with The Atlantic’s Hanna Rosin about what Boyd sees as the major myths regarding teens’ use of social media, exploring tropes about identity, privacy, safety, danger, and bullying. Boyd argues that society fails kids when paternalism and protectionism hinder their ability to become informed, thoughtful, and engaged citizens through their online interactions. How will emerging technologies continue to impact a new generation of Americans?

May 25 2015

56mins

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Will Today’s Anti-Racism Marches Lead to Meaningful Change?

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Across the United States, from rural areas to cities and suburbs, people have been hitting the streets to protest racism and police brutality. How is the national fervor around anti-racism different than in the past when people rallied following the death of Trayvon Martin in 2012, or when Civil Rights protestors called for an end to segregation in the 1960s? Alicia Garza, co-creator of #BlackLivesMatter, says she hopes it’s a moment of change when institutions, like police departments, examine their practices, and communities take a close look at rules and roles that disenfranchise Black people. She speaks with Michael Eric Dyson, sociology professor at Georgetown University, and Eugene Scott, political reporter at The Washington Post, about fighting racial oppression in America. The views and opinions of the speakers in the podcast do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.

Jul 08 2020

39mins

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Showing Up and Creating Community

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Social unrest and physical distancing are not making it easy to connect with other people. Mia Birdsong says it’s particularly important that in this time we show up for one another to offer strength, support, and accountability. Birdsong’s new book, How We Show Up: Reclaiming Family, Friendship, and Community, digs into why many people feel isolated in a society built on community. In this polarized time, she says the ever-present injustices built around race, class, gender, values, and beliefs aren’t what separate us. Instead, it’s denial of our interdependence and a need for belonging. She speaks with friend and fellow author Courtney Martin. The views and opinions of the speakers in the podcast do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.

Jun 30 2020

55mins

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The Role of Art in an Uncertain World

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Nearly three decades ago, the play “Twilight Los Angeles” — about the Rodney King trial verdict — premiered. Just like in 1992, the world is seeing the problem of racial injustice come back into focus. How is art confronting a racist system in America? What has changed since the riots in LA? Oskar Eustis, artistic director at the Public Theater in New York, speaks with Anna Deavere Smith, the creator of “Twilight Los Angeles.” They discuss how, even though arts institutions are mostly closed because of the coronavirus pandemic, artists continue to work. They’re thinking deeply about how to use their craft to push the country forward in a critical moment. The views and opinions of the speakers in the podcast do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.

Jun 24 2020

43mins

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Race, Covid-19, and America’s Health Care System

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When Covid-19 first started appearing in the United States, it was perceived as an illness that affected travelers, like Tom Hanks. Soon, though, it became clear the disease was infecting people of color more than any other group. Black people are 3.5 times more likely to die of the virus than white people, and Latino people are nearly twice as likely to die, according to researchers at Yale and the University of Pittsburgh. Why is this? Part of the problem is that racism is embedded in the country’s health care system. Raegan McDonald-Mosley, chief medical officer of Planned Parenthood of Maryland, and Thomas Fisher, emergency medical physician at the University of Chicago, speak with Maria Hinojosa, anchor and executive producer of NPR’s Latino USA, about American racism through the lens of Covid-19. The views and opinions of the speakers in the podcast do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.

Jun 17 2020

41mins

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We’re All Connected: The Importance of Global Literacy

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As we’ve seen with the coronavirus pandemic and anti-racism protests — distance no longer means much. What started in a Chinese city spread to the corners of the earth and what happened on the streets of Minneapolis launched action around the globe. We live in a global era and what happens thousands of miles away can deeply affect our lives. Richard Haass, author of the new book The World: A Brief Introduction, says global literacy is a must this day in age because what happens outside a country matters enormously to what happens inside. He speaks with Jane Harman, president of the Woodrow Wilson Center, about his book and relevant contemporary issues. The views and opinions of the speakers in the podcast do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.

Jun 10 2020

40mins

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What Is Antiracism and Can It Save Society? (Rebroadcast)

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Demonstrations over race and police brutality have erupted after the death of George Floyd. Floyd, and African-American, died in police custody in Minneapolis. A leading voice on antiracism, Ibram X. Kendi says countering racism is essential to the formation of a just and equitable society — so, how can we fight it? To recognize racism, we need to define it and then understand it’s opposite. Racism, Kendi says, is powerful and can change the way we see and value others and ourselves. In his conversation with Jemele Hill, staff writer for The Atlantic, Kendi talks about his own battle with racism, why it’s so difficult to talk productively about it, and why understanding history is essential to combatting it. This conversation was originally held in 2019. The views and opinions of the speakers in the podcast do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.

Jun 02 2020

56mins

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How to Be Less Lonely in the Pandemic

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Are Zoom connections and physical distancing making us lonelier? Vivek Murthy, former Surgeon General and author of Together, says prior to the pandemic people dealt with loneliness, which affects our health and well-being. Now, feelings of disconnection may be more difficult to bear. “If we allow physical distancing to translate into social distancing, we will experience a deepening of our loneliness,” he says. But it doesn’t have to be this way. Instead, we can choose a path of social revival in the pandemic, he says. Murthy speaks with Olga Khazan, staff writer for The Atlantic, about his book Together, which took him on a journey to discover why people experience loneliness. The views and opinions of the speakers in the podcast do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.

May 27 2020

33mins

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How to Help Kids Process the Pandemic

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The Covid-19 crisis isn’t easy to bear as adults but what about young kids and teenagers? How are they coping with virtual learning, changes to their routines, and quarantine? Even before the pandemic, an increasing number of kids were experiencing anxiety, depression, and suicide. How can parents best support kids who may be dealing with additional stressors now? A panel of child experts including Tovah Klein, director of the Barnard College Center for Toddler Development, and Lisa Damour, adolescent psychologist and author of Under Stress, weigh in. They’re interviewed by Kate Julian, a senior editor at The Atlantic who’s latest story is “The Anxious Child, and the Crisis of Modern Parenting.”

May 19 2020

54mins

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Adopting a Dog during Quarantine? You’re Not Alone

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Have you considered adopting a dog lately? You’re not alone. Animal shelters and nonprofits are seeing a rise in the number of people adopting and fostering pets during the Covid-19 crisis. Before you bring home a new canine companion, dog cognition expert Alexandra Horowitz says there are a few things to consider. Horowitz, who runs the Dog Cognition Lab at Barnard College, wants these newly formed dog-human relationships to last beyond the pandemic. She also speaks with Brian Hare, professor of evolutionary anthropology at Duke University, about the mind of a dog. What’s your dog thinking when they welcome you home? How do they perceive you and the world around them?

May 12 2020

1hr 5mins

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Race, Society, and the Coronavirus Crisis

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The growth of American institutions like public education and organized labor has been stunted by racial hostility. Eduardo Porter, author of American Poison, explains how racial animus has blocked social cohesion throughout history. With the coronavirus pandemic, this stunted growth is partly to blame for why the United States has dealt with the crisis so poorly. While millions become infected and tens of millions lose their jobs, the components of country’s social safety net — health insurance, unemployment insurance, a lack of mandatory sick leave and childcare — are inadequate, says Porter. The virus has also impacted poor, low-income, and people of color disproportionately. Porter speaks with Maureen Conway, executive director of the Economic Opportunities Program at the Aspen Institute. The views and opinions of the speakers in the podcast do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.

May 05 2020

51mins

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Digital Access: The Haves and Have Nots

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The Digital Divide is the gap between those who have easy access to computers and the internet, and those who don’t. The problem this gap creates is becoming more acute during the coronavirus pandemic. As schools move to distance learning, workers are displaced from their jobs, and public services move online, the need for an affordable, reliable broadband connection and productivity technology is great. Low-income Americans and communities of color are particularly disadvantaged. Aspen Digital’s Vivian Schiller speaks with Geoffrey Starks, FCC commissioner, Jim Steyer, founder and CEO of Common Sense Media, Gigi Sohn, distinguished fellow at the Georgetown Law Institute for Technology Law & Policy, and Larry Irving, former Assistant Secretary for Communications and Information at the National Telecommunications and Information Administration. The views and opinions of the speakers in the podcast do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.

Apr 29 2020

55mins

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How Will America Reopen? A Bioethicist Weighs In.

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Zeke Emanuel was an architect of the Affordable Care Act, which turned 10-years-old this spring. With 22 million people unemployed in America because of the coronavirus pandemic, is universal coverage needed now more than ever? Emanuel says in such an uncertain environment, people are craving security. He thinks the pandemic will lead the Federal Government to rethink the importance of safety net programs like universal coverage. Emanuel, a bioethicist and oncologist, shares his thoughts on what needs to happen for America to reopen. He speaks with Perri Peltz, a documentary filmmaker, journalist, and public health advocate. The views and opinions of the speakers in the podcast do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.

Apr 21 2020

44mins

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Lincoln's Leadership in a Time of Crisis

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Humility, loyalty, rhetorical mastery — these were the leadership traits of President Abraham Lincoln, says historian John Stauffer. When Lincoln entered office in 1861, the situation in America was dire. States were seceding and America was on the brink of war. How did he utilize his strengths in the face of great crisis? Should today’s leaders, who are challenged by the cataclysm of the coronavirus pandemic, look to Lincoln’s leadership? Stauffer, a professor at Harvard, speaks with Colleen Shogan, director of the David Rubenstein Center for White House History at the White House Historical Association. The views and opinions of the speakers in the podcast do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.

Apr 14 2020

55mins

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A Coronavirus Stress Test for the World

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Journalist and New York Times op-ed writer Thomas Friedman says countries around the world are undergoing a stress test thanks to the coronavirus pandemic. This test, he says, is revealing the quality of nations’ governance, their health care systems, and the strength of their communities. Perhaps surprisingly, some autocratic regimes have fared well, he says, while some democracies – like the United States – have not. Friedman speaks with Elliot Gerson, an executive vice president at the Aspen Institute. Their conversation was held by the Society of Fellows at the Institute. The views and opinions of the speakers in the podcast do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.

Apr 08 2020

46mins

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China, Technology, and the Coronavirus

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China was the first country in the world to experience effects from COVID-19. Now the epidemic there is slowing. How did the country of more than 1 billion people make it through? Technology played a big role. In this episode, Lydia Lee, Gary Liu, and Andrew McLaughlin join Vivian Schiller, executive director of the Aspen Digital program at the Aspen Institute, to talk over the kinds of technology that were launched or re-purposed to address aspects of the crisis. How did technology help keep the virus from spreading? How was misinformation handled online? Are there lessons that the United States can draw from? The views and opinions of the speakers in the podcast do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.

Apr 01 2020

57mins

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Highs and Lows: Unpacking Teen Emotions

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During the coronavirus epidemic, many families are spending lots of time together. Families with teenagers may notice extreme highs and lows – and it’s not just because of the global crisis. Once they reach adolescence, kids land on an emotional rollercoaster and even question their own extreme reactions. As parents, teachers, coaches, and mentors, how can we help teens communicate and navigate the intensity of their emotions? Leading experts on girls, boys, and the neuroscience of the adolescent brain shed light on this perplexing – and exciting – decade of development. Hear from Lisa Damour, Leah Sommerville, Michael Reichert, and Lori Gottlieb. The views and opinions of the speakers in the podcast do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.

Mar 25 2020

1hr

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How to Be Less Fearful in Turbulent Times (Rebroadcast)

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What are the best tools for dealing with fear, particularly in an uncertain period? “Human beings wrestle with fear. We are living in anxious times,” says Kansas pastor Adam Hamilton. Hamilton, who founded the United Methodist Church of the Resurrection, created five sermons to help people feel less fearful. In this episode, he explains what he wrote in the sermons and later in a book, Unafraid: Living with Courage and Hope in Uncertain Times. “People felt like these [sermons] were really helpful to them. They felt like they had a bit more of a handle on what was happening in the world around them,” he says. Whether it’s fear about politics, disappointment and failure, or problems out of our control (like the coronavirus outbreak), Hamilton’s advice is useful in turbulent times. The views and opinions of the speakers in the podcast do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.

Mar 17 2020

54mins

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Reporting the News in a Fractured America

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Two major news stories are dominating headlines: the novel coronavirus and the 2020 presidential contest. Both are vulnerable to disinformation campaigns, so what are newsrooms and technology companies doing to combat false news? What did journalists learn in 2016 that they can apply to political coverage in 2020? Local news is the most trusted news source but many newspapers are folding. How can small town newspapers find their footing and continue to offer trusted information? The conversation includes Richard Gingras, senior director of news and social products at Google, Brian Stelter, host of CNN’s “Reliable Sources,” Joanne Lipman, former editor-in-chief of USA Today, and Vivian Schiller, former NPR president and executive director of a program at the Aspen Institute that examines the role of media and technology in society. The views and opinions of the speakers in the podcast do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.

Mar 10 2020

1hr 6mins

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Straight from the Source: Experts Discuss Novel Coronavirus

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More than 100 cases of the novel coronavirus have been reported in the United States, as of March 3, 2020. Nine people in the country have died from the disease. That’s far less than in countries like China, Iran, and Italy. What’s being done to prevent the spread of COVID-19 in America and beyond? How quickly can a vaccine be developed? What can individuals do to stay safe? A panel of health experts including Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Nancy Messonnier, director of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases at the CDC, and Ron Klain, former White House Ebola Response Coordinator, sit down together discuss what’s being done. Their conversation is led by Helen Branswell who reports on infectious diseases and public health for STAT News. The views and opinions of the speakers in the podcast do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.

Mar 03 2020

50mins

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What Will We Eat in a Hotter, Drier World?

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Unpredictable weather is threatening crop production and a swelling population is increasing the demand for food. How will we eat in a hotter, more crowded world? The race to reinvent the global food system is on, and innovative solutions are already being served up. Meat produced from animal cells is one solution, says CEO of Memphis Meats Uma Valeti. "Can we start thinking about evolving our food system in a transformative way to feed 10 billion people and beyond?" He joins Amanda Little, author of The Fate of Food: What We'll Eat in a Bigger, Hotter, Smarter World, and Susan Goldberg, editor-in-chief of National Geographic to discuss new methods of food production. The views and opinions of the speakers in the podcast do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.

Feb 25 2020

59mins

Play

iTunes Ratings

163 Ratings
Average Ratings
102
29
11
11
10

Universe

By Digiverse - Feb 22 2020
Read more
Cool!! I do wish that they would make a podcast about the multiverse and more about black holes!

Great podcast a must subscription!

By Traveling RPh - Oct 27 2016
Read more
Great thought provoking discussion on timely issues!