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Rank #40 in Philosophy category

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Philosophy
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Aspen Ideas to Go

Updated 6 days ago

Rank #40 in Philosophy category

Society & Culture
Philosophy
News
Politics
Read more

Aspen Ideas to Go is a show about big ideas that will open your mind. Featuring compelling conversations with the world’s top thinkers and doers from a diverse range of disciplines, Aspen Ideas to Go gives you front-row access to the Aspen Ideas Festival and other events presented by the Aspen Institute.

Read more

Aspen Ideas to Go is a show about big ideas that will open your mind. Featuring compelling conversations with the world’s top thinkers and doers from a diverse range of disciplines, Aspen Ideas to Go gives you front-row access to the Aspen Ideas Festival and other events presented by the Aspen Institute.

iTunes Ratings

139 Ratings
Average Ratings
86
24
10
9
10

Great podcast a must subscription!

By Traveling RPh - Oct 27 2016
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Great thought provoking discussion on timely issues!

A must listen

By Box alder - Jul 04 2016
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Every episode I've listened to has been incredible. Especially Stephany Seay of the BFC.

iTunes Ratings

139 Ratings
Average Ratings
86
24
10
9
10

Great podcast a must subscription!

By Traveling RPh - Oct 27 2016
Read more
Great thought provoking discussion on timely issues!

A must listen

By Box alder - Jul 04 2016
Read more
Every episode I've listened to has been incredible. Especially Stephany Seay of the BFC.

Listen to:

Cover image of Aspen Ideas to Go

Aspen Ideas to Go

Updated 6 days ago

Read more

Aspen Ideas to Go is a show about big ideas that will open your mind. Featuring compelling conversations with the world’s top thinkers and doers from a diverse range of disciplines, Aspen Ideas to Go gives you front-row access to the Aspen Ideas Festival and other events presented by the Aspen Institute.

Millennials and Motivation, Featuring Simon Sinek and Adam Grant

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Millennials shoulder a lot of stereotypes. They’re called entitled and in need of instant gratification. They’re not committed to their work and expect a work-life balance at their very first job. Do these labels actually define them? Are they really any different than the generations before them? In this lighthearted and informative conversation, organizational psychologist Adam Grant and inspirational teacher Simon Sinek sit down with Katie Couric. Couric is an award-winning journalist. They explore what motivates Millennials at work and how the digital world is impacting their productivity.

Aug 01 2017

1hr 3mins

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Love, Sex, and the Brain

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What makes two people click? What does it really mean to say, “we have chemistry”? The Atlantic's Olga Khazan talks to biological anthropologist Helen Fisher about the four styles of thought and behavior that Fisher has identified through brain scans that help explain the biological underpinnings of romantic love, love addiction, adultery, and divorce. Based on data collected from 35,000 single Americans, Fisher explains modern courtship, why a trend she calls “slow love” makes her optimistic about relationships in the digital age, and how to use brain chemistry to keep love alive.

Show Notes Listen to the Aspen Ideas to Go episode, What Is Technology's Toll on Intimacy?. Follow us on Twitter at @aspenideas and Facebook. Email your comments to aspenideastogo@gmail.com. The views and opinions of the speakers in the podcast do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.

Jun 19 2018

1hr

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A Conversation with Ruth Bader Ginsburg

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As the second female justice confirmed to the US Supreme Court, Ruth Bader Ginsburg says her experiences as a female give her a unique perspective her male colleagues don’t share. In this episode, Justice Ginsburg talks about her relationships with Justices Sandra Day O’Connor and the late Antonin Scalia. She also explains what it’s like to work with newly-elected Justice Neil Gorsuch. Her discussion with the Aspen Wye Fellows, also touches on her book My Own Words. Ginsburg is interviewed by Elliot Gerson, executive vice president of policy and public programs at the Aspen Institute.

Jun 14 2017

1hr

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Crash Course on Happiness

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The number of college students dealing with stress, depression, and anxiety is growing. Psychology professor Laurie Santos noticed it in her Yale classroom and set out to change the campus culture. Her course “Psychology and the Good Life” is the most popular class in Yale’s 300-year history. In this episode, she talks about her efforts to infuse wellness into her students’ lives. She gives a crash course on how to feel less stressed and depressed, and find more meaning in your life. It’s applicable to everyone—whether you’re an undergraduate or a retiree.

Show Notes Register for the 2019 Aspen Ideas Festival. Follow Aspen Ideas to Go on Twitter and Facebook. Email your comments to aspenideastogo@gmail.com. The views and opinions of the speakers in the podcast do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.

Dec 31 2018

58mins

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The Road to Depth, Thinking about what Character Is

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Description Some people seem to lead inner lives that are richer and more substantive than the rest of us. How do they do it? In this talk, author and commentator David Brooks explores some of history's leaders in terms of personal character. He asks how love, suffering, struggle, surrender and obedience lead them to their depth. His latest book, "The Road to Character" was released on April 14, 2015. This talk, recorded last summer at the Aspen Ideas Festival, serves as a preview to many of the themes Brooks explores in the book.

Apr 27 2015

57mins

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How to Lead a More Meaningful Life at Work

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Adam Grant is exploring “how to make work suck less.” For his podcast WorkLife, he visited unconventional companies to discover how to improve the work experience. Grant, who authored Give and Take and teaches at the Wharton School, thinks we should be leading more creative and meaningful lives at work. After all, we spend a quarter of our lives there. He speaks with Mike Kaplan, president and CEO of the Aspen Skiing Company based in Aspen, Colorado.

Show Notes Listen to the Aspen Insight episode Beyond a Level Playing Field. Follow Aspen Ideas to Go on Twitter and Facebook. Email your comments to aspenideastogo@gmail.com. The views and opinions of the speakers in the podcast do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.

Oct 16 2018

56mins

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The Road to Character - David Brooks and Katie Couric

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I wrote this book not sure I could follow the road to character, but I wanted at least to know what the road looks like and how other people have trodden it, David Brooks has said about his experience writing his latest New York Times bestseller about personal virtues and honesty in a materialistic age. Katie Couric explores this journey with the deeply thoughtful author.

Jan 11 2016

58mins

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The Perils of Over-Parenting

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By trying to provide the perfectly happy childhood, a generation of parents may be making it harder for their kids to actually grow up. Hear from psychologists Polly Young-Eisendrath and Madeline Levine, as well as psychotherapist Lori Gottlieb on how our preoccupation with choice, self-esteem, and happiness may be yielding a generation marked by entitlement, materialism, narcissism, and an inability to face the challenges of adult life. The conversation is led by award-winning journalist Katie Couric.

Show Notes Watch What is the Goal of Parenting? from the Aspen Ideas Festival. Follow our show on Twitter @aspenideas and Facebook at facebook.com/aspenideas. Email your comments to aspenideastogo@gmail.com.

May 15 2018

54mins

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Getting the Biggest Happiness Bang for Your Buck

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When our bank accounts are full, are we happier? Does a pay raise at work equal increased joy? What is the link between money and happiness? Behavioral scientist Elizabeth Dunn says money can buy happiness if you follow some core principles of smart spending. She and Robert Frank, Cornell professor and author of the Economic View column in The New York Times, explain how changing the way we think about money can help promote happiness. Spoiler alert: The happiness trifecta, as defined by Dunn, doesn’t explicitly include the amount of dough you have. Their conversation, held in June, is led by Adrienne LaFrance, executive editor of The Atlantic. The views and opinions of the podcast guests are their own and do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.

Sep 24 2019

51mins

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Finding Happiness at Every Stage of Life

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Economists who have researched happiness over a lifetime find it starts to decline after adolescence and noticeably dips when people enter middle age. How can we avoid the middle age blues and feel purposeful later in life? Arthur Brooks, behavioral economist and American Enterprise Institute president, uses eastern and western philosophies, classical music, and the latest research to give usable advice on how to be joyful throughout life’s different stages. It’s inescapable that we’ll grow older, so how can we develop new strengths as our life journey progresses?

Show Notes At the Aspen Ideas Festival in June, Arthur Brooks will talk about his new book, Love Your Enemies: How Decent People Can Save America from Our Culture of Contempt. Passes to the Festival are still available. Register today! Email your comments to aspenideastogo@gmail.com. The views and opinions of the speakers in the podcast do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.

Apr 02 2019

47mins

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Circuit Training for Your Brain: Well-Being Is a Skill

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Scientific evidence suggests that we can change our brains by transforming our minds and cultivating habits of mind that will improve well-being. These include happiness, resilience, compassion, and emotional balance. Each of these characteristics is instantiated in brain circuits that exhibit plasticity and thus can be shaped and modified by experience and training. Mental training to cultivate well-being has profound implications for schools, the workplace, and society as a whole. Richard J. Davidsonis the William James and Vilas Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry and director of the Waisman Laboratory for Brain Imaging and Behavior at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Davidson has published over 320 articles and edited 14 books, including The Emotional Life of Your Brain. NOTE: Davidson shared a couple of short video clips during his talk at the Festival. The first shows video games developed for kids to cultivate habits of kindness and pro-social behavior. The second is a demonstration of the preschool kindness curriculum that he refers to in the podcast. Watch here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V8BvPl8tylU

Jul 27 2015

43mins

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"Extra" with Maria Hinojosa

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Now, more than ever, a diversifying United States needs a shared base of knowledge. That’s according to Eric Liu, executive director of the Citizenship and American Identity Program at the Aspen Institute. He’s calling on the American public and cultural leaders to build a crowd-sourced national list of facts and references every American should know. In this “Extra” episode, he talks to Maria Hinojosa, an award-winning news anchor and reporter. She founded the Futuro Media Group and hosts Latino USA, NPR’s only national Latino news and cultural weekly radio program. (Music: Podington Bear/Jack)

May 26 2016

20mins

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What Is Antiracism and Can It Save Society?

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Countering racism is essential to the formation of a just and equitable society — so how can we fight it? Ibram X. Kendi says to be able to recognize racism we need to define it and then understand it’s opposite: antiracism. In his new best-selling book, How to Be an Antiracist, Kendi explains that racism is powerful and can change the way we see and value others and ourselves. How can we recognize racism and work to oppose it? In his conversation with Jemele Hill, staff writer for The Atlantic, Kendi talks about his own battle with racism, why it’s so difficult to talk productively about racism, and why an understanding of history is essential to combating racism. The views and opinions of the podcast guests are their own and do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.

Oct 22 2019

55mins

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What Should You Be Eating to Live a Longer Life?

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To find the path to long life and health, Dan Buettner and his team study the world’s “Blue Zones,” communities whose elders live with vim and vigor to record-setting age. In this episode, Buettner debunks the most common nutrition myths and offers a science-backed blueprint that outlines how the average American can live another 12 quality years. What are the diet and lifestyle habits that keep people spry past age 100? What should you be eating to live a longer life? Buettner is in conversation with Ezekiel Emanuel, chair of the Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy at the University of Pennsylvania.

Nov 15 2016

59mins

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Robotic Moment: Who Do We Become When We Talk to Machines? (Aspen Lecture)

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Conversation is facing a crisis in our culture. We regularly put people on "pause" in conversation to check our phones. We treat machines as if they are almost human. We want technology to step up, as we ask humans to step back. And having nothing to forget about how we used to relate to one another, children embrace these new rules for talking to machines. In this talk, Sherry Turkle, MIT professor of the social studies of science and technology and author of "Reclaiming Conversation: The Power of Talk in a Digital Age," explains how we have arrived at this "robotic moment." She explores what she calls the "four fantasies of the robotic relationship" and the impact our dwindling face-to-face conversations have on empathy.

Oct 26 2015

56mins

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TAKEOVER 5: Pete Dominick with Michele Norris and others

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TAKEOVER is a special series of episodes that puts you on the ground during the Aspen Ideas Festival in Aspen, Colorado. This episode features Pete Dominick (comedian, radio host) as takeover host in conversation with Michele Norris (journalist, The Race Card Project) and Alec Ross (Author, "The Industries of the Future"). Dominick infuses humor into interesting conversation about politics, culture and future business. Music: Gillicuddy, Podington Bear

Jul 03 2016

38mins

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The Imagination of Leonardo da Vinci with Walter Isaacson

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Walter Isaacson is fascinated by innovators — the kinds of geniuses whose ideas have transformed industry, science, and society. Albert Einstein, Steve Jobs, and Benjamin Franklin each grabbed his attention in ways that allow us, as readers, to discover the depth and breadth of their brilliant thinking and creative sensibilities. Now comes Leonardo da Vinci, whose boundless curiosity renders him perhaps the greatest creative genius of all time. Isaacson explains the lessons that da Vinci left behind that we can apply to our own lives. He speaks with David Rubenstein about his book Leonardo da Vinci, which was released in bookstores today.

Find our companion episode, "Einstein's Creativity," by clicking here. Follow the show on Twitter @aspenideas and Facebook at facebook.com/aspenideas. Email your comments to aspenideastogo@gmail.com.

Oct 17 2017

55mins

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How History's Mistakes Guide Today's Leaders

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Historian Jon Meacham has written extensively about the presidency, with acclaimed books on Thomas Jefferson, Andrew Jackson, Franklin Roosevelt, and most recently, George H. W. Bush. What does his research into these presidents suggest about the nature of the office? What might we learn from the past about the current state of politics, the White House, and perhaps more broadly, democracy in America? He speaks with John Dickerson, co-host of "CBS This Morning."

Find the Aspen Insight episode, "Finding Meaning in Your Work" by clicking here. Listen to the latest episode of our sister podcast Aspen Insight. Follow our show on Twitter @aspenideas and Facebook at facebook.com/aspenideas. Email your comments to aspenideastogo@gmail.com.

Feb 21 2018

53mins

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Larry Summers on Trade, Tariffs, and the Economy

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Former treasury secretary Larry Summers has been vocal about his disagreements with the current direction of US economic policy, particularly in the areas of trade, tariffs, and the rethinking of international agreements on commerce and investment. What would he do differently? What do we need to do to really ensure economic growth? He speaks with Jillian Tett, US Managing Editor of the Financial Times.

Show Notes Listen to the Aspen Ideas to Go episode How Artificial Intelligence Will Transform Industry. Follow the show on Twitter and Facebook. Email your comments to aspenideastogo@gmail.com. The views and opinions of the speakers in the podcast do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.

Sep 26 2018

51mins

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How to Learn Anything Fast

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Best-selling author of "The First 20 Hours: How to Learn Anything Fast!" Josh Kaufman shares universal, field-tested approaches to effective learning and rapid skill acquisition in adults. From deconstructing complex skills to maximizing productive practice and removing common learning barriers, Kaufman describes how 20 hours of focused, deliberate practice can help you develop surprising levels of skill in any field. And, he may even play his Ukulele.

(music bed: Podington Bear/Golden Hour)

Apr 27 2016

56mins

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How Your Data Powers Artificial Intelligence

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Artificial intelligence isn’t something we’ll see in the future. Thinking machines are already here, and nine powerful companies in the US and China control their development. The spam filter in your email inbox is AI. So are programs like Google Translate. The next level for thinking machines is when they begin learning the way humans learn. As artificial intelligence gets refined, who’s keeping track of whether these machines share our motivations, desires, and hopes for the future of humanity? Amy Webb, author of The Big Nine: How the Tech Titans and Their Thinking Machines Could Warp Humanity, speaks with Alexis Madrigal, a staff writer for The Atlantic who covers Silicon Valley. The views and opinions of the podcast guests are their own and do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.

Dec 04 2019

54mins

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Evangelicals and America’s Culture War

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In the 2016 presidential election, more than 80 percent of white evangelicals voted for President Trump. At one point (in the 19th century) evangelicals were associated with malcontents who fought for prison reform, abolitionism, and even early feminism. Now, this group is “the most loyal and most vital element of the Trump coalition,” says Michael Gerson, syndicated columnist for The Washington Post. He sits down with Kate Bowler, author of Blessed: A History of the American Prosperity Gospel, David French, senior writer for National Review, and Chris Buskirk, editor and publisher of American Greatness. In 2016, some pundits thought evangelicals wouldn’t support Trump, who’s been accused of sexual assault and married three times. How can this deeply faithful group rally behind a president whose behaviors and values don’t exactly match up to traditional Christian mores? The views and opinions of the podcast guests are their own and do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.

Nov 26 2019

48mins

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Separating Myth from Reality in American History

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Two Pulitzer Prize-winning historians explain the difference between myth and reality in American history. David Blight, a professor at Yale, says we use myths to help process history, which can be dismal. “Much of history is dark because human nature is dark. We sometimes have to process the past in sentimentalism — in stories that allow us to wake up in the morning.” Annette Gordon-Reed, an American legal history professor at Harvard, says the point of history is to figure out how you got to where you are in present-day. Blight and Gordon-Reed sit down with John Dickerson, correspondent for “60 Minutes,” to discuss correcting America’s historical memory. They touch on historical events like the white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, and whether reparations for injustice are realistic. The views and opinions of the podcast guests are their own and do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.

Nov 20 2019

56mins

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"Educated" with Tara Westover

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Tara Westover's childhood was distinct. Raised by survivalists in the mountains of Idaho, she encountered extreme adversity. She wasn't allowed to attend school, and instead worked in her father's junkyard. She suffered serious injuries, and was sometimes at the mercy of a volatile and abusive older brother. She chronicled her story in "Educated," a best-selling book she hopes people find relatable. "I wrote the book in such a way that people, I hoped, could have some little pieces of the experiences I had. I wanted that to through a filter of their own lives," she says. She speaks with Jeffrey Goldberg, editor in chief of The Atlantic.

Nov 13 2019

50mins

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How to Quash Bias

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Bias is natural — it’s one way we make sense of the world. It becomes problematic when our biases become stereotypes and prejudices. So how do we manage bias, particularly in the classroom and workplace? Jennifer Eberhardt, author of “Biased: Uncovering the Hidden Prejudice That Shapes What We See, Think, and Do,” sits down with Adam Grant, host of the WorkLife podcast to go over the science behind bias. How effective are workplace diversity trainings and how can we get at bias early before it becomes ingrained? John Dickerson, correspondent for “60 Minutes,” moderates the conversation. The views and opinions of the podcast guests are their own and do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.

Nov 05 2019

1hr 9mins

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Life Will Break Your Heart, with Kate Bowler

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When she was 35 years old, Kate Bowler was diagnosed with stage IV colon cancer. She had been on an upward spiral: thriving in her career and loving life with her husband and newborn son. Bowler, who’s a scholar of Christianity, had just written the book “Blessed,” about the Christian idea that good things happen to good people. But through her experience of personal suffering, she realized no amount of determination can stop bad things from happening to anyone, no matter your level of faith. In an intimate conversation with David Brooks, op-ed columnist for The New York Times, Bowler talks about human frailty, why optimism can sometimes be a burden, and the dangers of worshiping at the altar of success. Bowler, who teaches at Duke Divinity School, has a new book out this month, “The Preacher’s Wife.” David Brooks runs a program at the Aspen Institute called Weave: The Social Fabric Project. The views and opinions of the podcast guests are their own and do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.

Oct 29 2019

56mins

Play

What Is Antiracism and Can It Save Society?

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Countering racism is essential to the formation of a just and equitable society — so how can we fight it? Ibram X. Kendi says to be able to recognize racism we need to define it and then understand it’s opposite: antiracism. In his new best-selling book, How to Be an Antiracist, Kendi explains that racism is powerful and can change the way we see and value others and ourselves. How can we recognize racism and work to oppose it? In his conversation with Jemele Hill, staff writer for The Atlantic, Kendi talks about his own battle with racism, why it’s so difficult to talk productively about racism, and why an understanding of history is essential to combating racism. The views and opinions of the podcast guests are their own and do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.

Oct 22 2019

55mins

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Using Tech to Bring Humanity Back to Medicine

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In modern-day medicine, doctors have little time to spend with patients because rote tasks, like taking notes and performing medical scans, use up their precious time. Eric Topol, a prominent cardiologist, says there has been a steady degradation of the human side of health care – ever since medicine became big business. “We have de-humanized health care. We have gutted the care of health care. This is our only shot to get it back.” He believes artificial intelligence can help free time for doctors so they can listen more closely to patients about their medical concerns. He speaks with David Brooks, op-ed columnist for The New York Times, about Topol's latest book, “Deep Medicine.” Topol is executive vice president of Scripps Research. Brooks is executive director of Weave: The Social Fabric Project at the Aspen Institute.

Oct 15 2019

50mins

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The Chief: Will a Swing Vote Change the Future of the Supreme Court?

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The Supreme Court will take up contentious issues like gay rights, health care, abortion, and DACA this term, which kicked off Monday. The outcome of these cases may hinge on one vote — from Chief Justice John Roberts. Roberts is at the center of the Court not just because he’s Chief but because he’s a swing vote. Joan Biskupic, author of The Chief: The Life and Turbulent Times of Chief Justice John Roberts, says Roberts wrestles with two competing impulses: his strong commitment to certain conservative principles and his concern for the institutional legitimacy of the Court. Biskupic speaks with Jeffrey Rosen, president and CEO of the National Constitution Center, about the dynamic of the Court and Roberts’ great influence on it — inside and outside the courtroom. The views and opinions of the podcast guests are their own and do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.

Oct 09 2019

54mins

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Lawlessness on the High Seas

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One of the most lawless places on earth is the high seas – remote waters, often hundreds of miles from shore. These largely ungoverned waters play host to criminal acts like sea slavery, gun running, human trafficking, and abuse of stowaways. “The lack of protections for the people who work above the water line and the creatures below, I think, is a huge problem,” says New York Times investigative reporter Ian Urbina. Urbina spent five perilous years jumping aboard fishing vessels and talking with the victims of these inhumanities. His book Outlaw Ocean: Journeys Across the Last Untamed Frontier, chronicles their stories and what can be done to protect workers and the wild places they frequent. M. Sanjayan, CEO of Conservation International, interviews Urbina.

Oct 01 2019

40mins

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Getting the Biggest Happiness Bang for Your Buck

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When our bank accounts are full, are we happier? Does a pay raise at work equal increased joy? What is the link between money and happiness? Behavioral scientist Elizabeth Dunn says money can buy happiness if you follow some core principles of smart spending. She and Robert Frank, Cornell professor and author of the Economic View column in The New York Times, explain how changing the way we think about money can help promote happiness. Spoiler alert: The happiness trifecta, as defined by Dunn, doesn’t explicitly include the amount of dough you have. Their conversation, held in June, is led by Adrienne LaFrance, executive editor of The Atlantic. The views and opinions of the podcast guests are their own and do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.

Sep 24 2019

51mins

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Combating Climate Change One Protest at a Time

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Three decades ago, writer Bill McKibben gave a warning about impacts from global warming in his book The End of Nature. Since then, little has been done to tackle the problem, which is growing. Weather events are worsening and communities are suffering from stronger storms, heat waves, wildfires, and more. “The world is now in violent and chaotic flux,” he says. To address this emergency, he suggests transitioning from fossil fuels to renewable energy and hitting the streets. His organization 350.org has held rallies around the world to bring attention to the climate crisis. With the Global Climate Strike just around the corner (September 20), McKibben gives a call to arms to protect our planet and humanity itself. The views and opinions of the podcast guests are their own and do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.

Sep 17 2019

1hr 11mins

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What's Facebook Doing to Protect Elections?

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With just five months until primary season ramps up in the United States, what’s being done to ensure bad actors don’t attack our elections? In 2016, Russia used cyberattacks and social media to sow division in the presidential race. What lessons were learned by companies like Facebook and entities like NATO and the Federal Government? Facebook’s head of election security, Katie Harbath, sits down with former Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson, and Douglas Lute, a former US ambassador to NATO. Nicholas Thompson, editor in chief of WIRED, leads the conversation, which was held in June. The views and opinions of the podcast guests are their own and do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.

Sep 10 2019

52mins

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How Valerie Jarrett Overcame Race, Gender Barriers on Her Way to the West Wing

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How did an Iranian-born single mom make her way to the “room where it happened,” ultimately serving as one of the closest advisors to the president of the United States? As the longest running senior advisor to a US president in history, Valerie Jarrett worked with President Obama during his 8 years in office. Before reaching the White House, Jarrett dealt with hardships like a failed marriage and a purposeless job. Still, she went on to break race and gender barriers in the 1970s and 1980s and work on equality for women and girls, civil rights, and our criminal justice system. She chronicles her story in her book “Finding My Voice: My Journey to the West Wing and the Path Forward.” In this light-hearted conversation with Jonathan Capehart, opinion writer for The Washington Post, Jarrett gets personal and offers real stories behind some of the most stirring moments of the Obama presidency. The views and opinions of the podcast guests are their own and do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.

Sep 03 2019

1hr 3mins

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An Unstable Global Economy: What’s to Blame?

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As the US and China continue their trade war, economic instability is rising in countries around the world. Gita Gopinath, chief economist at the International Monetary Fund, says the number one risk to the global economy is the trade war. The IMF is seeing weakening in industrial production, manufacturing, and investment. “All of this is very closely tied to trade, trade uncertainty, and policies related to that,” she says. In a wide-ranging conversation with Gillian Tett, editor at large for the Financial Times, Gopinath talks about whether a recession is looming for the US or elsewhere, why the IMF is redefining global growth, and how more women economic leaders can rise up. Gopinath is the IMF’s first female chief economist. The views and opinions of the podcast guests are their own and do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.

Aug 27 2019

50mins

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What Does Dignity Have to Do with Liberal Democracy?

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Starting in the 1970s, political scientist Francis Fukuyama says the world saw a significant expansion of democracy. Dozens of countries were becoming democracies and by 2008, more than 100 democracies existed around the globe. Now, says Fukuyama, liberal democracy is being challenged by populist nationalist leaders and they’re fanning the flames of identity politics. Instead of uniting over a shared sense of humanity, people are identifying in narrower ways based on things like religion, race, ethnicity, and gender. Fukuyama believes that in order to support democracy, we must inculcate a greater sense of dignity into society. Fukuyama speaks with Elliot Gerson, executive vice president at the Aspen Institute. The views and opinions of the podcast guests are their own and do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.

Aug 20 2019

1hr 1min

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Karl Rove on the Future of Conservatism

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Karl Rove served as deputy chief of staff and senior advisor to President George W. Bush before becoming a Fox News contributor. He has his finger on the pulse of today’s Republican party, but remembers a time when the party looked different. Today, more party members consider themselves nationalist and populist. Many are less concerned with deficient and smaller government and more worried about a cultural decline. Rove tells Rich Lowry, editor in chief of National Review, that even though the party’s broken, republicans are rallying behind President Trump. The views and opinions of the podcast guests are their own and do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.

Aug 13 2019

54mins

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Are the US and Mexico at a Breaking Point?

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Is the relationship between the United States and Mexico on shaky ground? This year, President Trump threatened to impose tariffs on Mexican imports if the country didn’t stop the flow of migrants from Central America. And, just this week, Mexican officials called a fatal shooting at an El Paso department store that killed eight Mexican nationals an “act of terrorism." Will the issues at the border lead to more tension between the two countries, or can they find compromise? Jorge Guajardo, former Mexican ambassador to China, joins Julián Aguilar, a reporter who covers border affairs for The Texas Tribune, and Jeh Johnson, former US secretary of homeland security for a discussion about what’s at stake. Mary Louise Kelly, co-host of NPR’s “All Things Considered,” moderates the conversation. The views and opinions of the podcast guests are their own and do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.

Aug 06 2019

50mins

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NATO Chief on Cyberspace, Trump, and Threats From Abroad

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In a wide-reaching discussion from the Aspen Security Forum, Jens Stoltenberg, secretary general of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), discusses the major threats in the world today. From cyber warfare to Russia pulling out of a key nuclear arms treaty, the 29-member alliance is grappling with challenges across the globe. Stoltenberg speaks with Courtney Kube, Pentagon and Defense Department correspondent for NBC News, about Russia, Turkey, Afghanistan, cyberspace, and President Trump, who has been critical of NATO. He stresses the importance of being part of the organization, which celebrated its 70th anniversary this year. “NATO is good for Europe, but it’s also extremely good for the United States,” he says. “It is extremely good to have friends and allies.” Their conversation was held July 17, 2019 in Aspen, Colorado.

Jul 30 2019

59mins

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The Inside Story of the Mueller Investigation: How Will It Play Out?

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Former Special Counsel Robert Mueller is scheduled to testify in front of Congress Wednesday. He’ll answer questions about the 400-plus page report he delivered to the Attorney General in March. The report details a two-year investigation on Russian election interference and whether President Trump obstructed justice. It left almost as many open questions as there were before Mueller began his probe. Some people argue the President has been cleared and it’s time to move on. How will what Mueller says to lawmakers change the public’s perspective? Will his testimony alter the trajectory in Washington? How will it impact policy? Neal Katyal, Georgetown Law professor, joins Ted Olson, former Solicitor General, and Garrett Graff, director of a Cyber-Journalism Initiative at the Aspen Institute. Mary Louise Kelly, co-host of “All Things Considered” at NPR, moderates their discussion. The views and opinions of the podcast guests are their own and do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.

Jul 22 2019

1hr 2mins

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