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Cambridge Law: Public Lectures from the Faculty of Law

A collection of public lectures either given at, or by members of, the Faculty of Law, University of Cambridge.

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'At the systematic edge: Where our conceptual categories no longer work' - SOAS Cambridge Speaker Series: Saskia Sassen (audio)

Speaker: Saskia Sassen is Professor, Columbia University and co-chairs its Committee on Global Thought. Her new book is Expulsions: When complexity produces elementary brutalities. (Harvard University Press 2014). The new speaker series brings together film-makers, writers, journalists and academics to tell stories about law, politics, gender and development in the global south, and the 'south in the north'. Confirmed speakers include: Jose Antonio Ocampo (economics); Rajeev Bhargava (political theory); Akeel Bilgrami (philosophy); Partha Chatterjee (political theory/history); Ken Loach (filmmaker), Saskia Sassen (sociology), and Richard Sennett (sociology). After an extremely successful inaugural season, the series continues this term with a focus on land, labour and cities. Co-organisers: Antara Haldar (Faculty of Law, University of Cambridge, ah447@cam.ac.uk, via Twitter @antarahaldar) and Diamond Ashiagbor (School of Law, SOAS, da40@soas.ac.uk).This entry provides an audio source for iTunes U.

56mins

16 Feb 2015

Rank #1

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Europe: Past, Present and Future: Speaker 3 - Norman Davies

The problems arising from Europe's troubled history was the subject of the fourth seminar in the ‘Future of Europe’ series, which took place at the University of Cambridge’s Faculty of Law in 2004.The seminar was held on Wednesday 28 January 2004, and discussed the issues of nationalism and the bitterness of past conflicts and how the problems still exist despite the creation of pan-European institutions.The seminar was chaired by Tim Blanning, Professor of Modern European History at the University of Cambridge. Speakers included Norman Davies, Historian, Oxford University; Misha Glenny, author and specialist in the history and politics of the Balkans; and Harold James, Professor of History, Princeton University. Each talk is available at the following links:1) Introduction - Tim Blanning (https://sms.cam.ac.uk/media/3137380);2) Speaker 1 - Harold James (https://sms.cam.ac.uk/media/3137391);3) Speaker 2 - Micha Glenny (https://sms.cam.ac.uk/media/3137402);4) Speaker 3 - Norman Davies (https://sms.cam.ac.uk/media/3137413).The ‘Future of Europe Seminars’ addressed the uncertainties that now beset the project of European integration, with the proposal to adopt a written Constitution for Europe and the addition of ten new member states in May 2004.With panels of leading specialists from Europe, the United States and beyond, the seminars provided a unique opportunity to share a wide range of knowledge and experience in understanding European integration and in thinking about its possible futures.The focus of the seminars was not the familiar political debate about Europe. The seminars were designed to debate Europe in a new and different way, as a constitutional, historical and cultural challenge.

22mins

7 Jan 2020

Rank #2

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'Constitutionalism and Private Law': The 2015 Cambridge Freshfields Lecture (audio)

On Wednesday 28 January 2015 Lord Hoffmann, Lord of Appeal in Ordinary from 1995 to 2009, delivered the 2015 Cambridge Freshfields Lecture entitled "Constitutionalism and Private Law". The Cambridge Freshfields Lecture is an annual address delivered by a guest of the Cambridge Private Law Centre, and the event is sponsored by Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer. More information about this lecture, including photographs from the event, is available from the Private Law Centre website at http://www.privatelaw.law.cam.ac.uk/events/past-eventsThis entry provides an audio source for iTunes U.

58mins

29 Jan 2015

Rank #3

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'The Mental Element in Murder: Reflections on the Pistorius Case': Christopher Forsyth

The trial of Oscar Pistorius for the murder of his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp aroused worldwide media interest. From the beginning Pistorius claimed that he had no intent to kill Reeva because when he fired the fatal shots her he thought he was firing at an intruder. And so whether he had the necessary intent to kill became a crucial issue in his trial.In this video Professor Christopher Forsyth describes the South African law on intent to kill and explains how it differs from the relevant English law. In particular he explains how South African law rejects all forms of “transferred malice” and the significance of this for the Pistorius trial.Although Ms Justice Thokozile Masipa in her judgment gives an exemplary account of the South African law, there is a curious departure from orthodoxy in her application of the law which may render her judgment vulnerable to appeal by the prosecution.Professor Christopher Forsyth is Professor of Public Law and Private International Law in the University of Cambridge, and Extraordinary Professor of Law in the University of Stellenbosch. For more information about Professor Forsyth, please refer to his profile at http://www.law.cam.ac.uk/people/academic/cf-forsyth/31Law in Focus is a collection of short videos featuring academics from the University of Cambridge Faculty of Law, addressing legal issues in current affairs and the news. These issues are examples of the many which challenge researchers and students studying undergraduate and postgraduate law at the Faculty.

18mins

28 Jan 2015

Rank #4

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'From Clarence Thomas to Brett Kavanaugh: The selection and politics of nominees to the US Supreme Court': Shanin Specter - Clare College Lecture

On 27 November 2018 Clare College, Cambridge, hosted Visiting Clare Fellow Mr Shanin Specter (1983) who delivered a lecture entitled "From Clarence Thomas to Brett Kavanaugh: The selection and politics of nominees to the US Supreme Court".Mr Specter has taught at the University of Pennsylvania Law School, UC Hastings College of the Law, UC Berkley School of Law and Stanford Law School. He is a founding Partner of the US firm Kilne & Specter.For any more information about the event, contact events@clare.cam.ac.uk

37mins

30 Nov 2018

Rank #5

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'Ensuring the Legitimacy of International Arbitration in a Globally Networked World' Cambridge Arbitration Lunch: 21 February 2019

The Arbitration Lunches are side-events organised in the weeks leading up to the annual Cambridge Arbitration Day, held this year for the sixth time on 16 March 2019.The first CAD Arbitration Lunch of 2019 took place at the Lauterpacht Centre on 21 February 2019, where Simon Maynard gave a talk entitled "Ensuring the Legitimacy of International Arbitration in a Globally Networked World".Simon is a Senior Associate at Three Crowns. He has acted as advocate in both investor-State and international commercial arbitrations across a broad range of sectors, including financial services, energy and construction. His recent engagements include representing an oil major in a dispute with a Southeast Asian State concerning adverse taxation measures, and acting for a Middle Eastern State in relation to a dispute arising from a long-term infrastructure contract.He is a member of the International Centre for Conflict Prevention and Resolution’s Banking and Financial Services Advisory Committee, as well as a visiting lecturer at the London School of Economics.For more information and to register for the main events, see: http://www.cambridgearbitrationday.org

22mins

26 Feb 2019

Rank #6

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Family Law Seminar: 'Reimagining Children's Equality' - Professor Nancy Dowd

An event co-hosted by Cambridge Family Law and the Cambridge Socio-Legal Group at the Faculty of Law on 12 November 2019.Speaker: Professor Nancy Dowd, David H. Levin Chair in Family Law at the University of Florida Levin College of Law.Professor Dowd will present the core thesis and arguments of her recent book, Reimagining Equality: A New Deal for Children of Color (NYU Press 2018). She argues that children’s equality must include developmental equality, meaning that each child should be supported to their full developmental capacity. She will present the three essential parts of the book and then hope to engage in discussion and feedback. She will focus most of her presentation on Part III of the book, which melds the developmental and legal implications of children’s inequalities and hierarchies among children. She will suggest strategies for change, which include three possibilities: using existing statutory frameworks, constitutional litigation and affirmative, comprehensive legislation that she calls a New Deal for Children, borrowing from the New Deal of the 1930s in the US.Professor Dowd is the David H. Levin Chair in Family Law at the University of Florida Levin College of Law, and an affiliate of the Anita Zucker Center. She served as Interim Director and Director of the Center on Children and Families at the UF law school from 2007-2015. She currently is a Distinguished Guest Professor at Aalborg University, Denmark, for 2018-2020, and in 2017 was the Fulbright Distinguished Chair in Public International Law at the Raoul Wallenberg Institute of Human Rights and Humanitarian Law and Lund University, Sweden. Her research focuses on social justice issues that link family law, juvenile law, constitutional law, critical race and gender analysis, and social change theories. She is the author of eight books and over 50 articles.For more information about the Cambridge Family Law Centre, see the website at: https://www.family.law.cam.ac.uk/

38mins

15 Nov 2019

Rank #7

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'A Precariat Charter: from Denizens to Citizens': Professor Guy Standing

On Monday 26 January 2015 Professor Standing spoke at the Cambridge University Faculty of Law, where he discussed his latest book, 'A Precariat Charter: from Denizens to Citizens' with Professor Simon Deakin.Guy Standing is Professor of Development Studies at SOAS, University of London, and a founder and co-President of the Basic Income Earth Network (BIEN), an NGO promoting basic income as a right. He has held chairs at the Universities of Bath and Monash (Australia) and was previously Director of the Socio-Economic Security Programme of the International Labour Organisation. He is currently working on pilot basic income schemes in India and on issues relating to his two recent books, The Precariat: The New Dangerous Class (2011) and A Precariat Charter: From Denizens to Citizens (2014).The event was kindly supported by the Cambridge Public Policy Strategic Research Initiative and the Cambridge Socio-Legal Group.

1hr 15mins

27 Jan 2015

Rank #8

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'Session 2: External Relations' - Georges Baur: CELS Brexit Symposium

On 14 March 2019 the Centre for European Legal Studies (CELS) hosted a symposium to discuss the potential implications of Brexit. The aim of this event was to provide informed commentary on issues within the ongoing Brexit process (whatever they may be). Programme: Session 1: Free Movement of Persons and Establishment What are the consequences of the Brexit process for the immediate and future rights of EU citizens within the UK and UK citizens travelling to or working within the EU. This would cover both the right to work, the right to be self-employed, and the rights of those not in employment. Chair: John Bell Martin Steinfeld (University of Cambridge) Eleanor Spaventa (Bocconi University, Italy) Session 2: External Relations What is the effect of the Brexit process on the UK’s ability to conclude trade agreements? What are the potential frameworks within which these might be developed? Chair: Geoffrey Edwards (POLIS) Markus Gehring (University of Cambridge) Georges Baur (Liechtenstein Institute, Formerly EFTA) Session 3: Goods and Services What is the effect of present and proposed arrangements on the free movement of goods and services? How far are the UK and EU markets to be segmented and how will this affect trading across borders, notably that in Northern Ireland? Chair: Stephen Weatherill (University of Oxford) Laurence Gormley (University of Groningen) Gareth Davies (Vrije University, Amsterdam) Session 4: Competition Law How will the substantive rules and procedures on competition law and state aids be affected by the Brexit process in the short and medium term? Chair: Albertina Albors-Llorens (University of Cambridge) Oke Odudu (University of Cambridge) Tim Ward (Monckton Chambers)

24mins

14 Mar 2019

Rank #9

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'In defence of Foakes v Beer': CULS Debate (audio)

On 21 January 2020, CULS hosted a debate on the proposition "In defence of Foakes v Beer", which featured Dr Janet O'Sullivan and Mr William Day, chaired by Dr Jonathan Morgan.This is the central question posed by the seminal contract case of Foakes v Beer, and a question which generations of law tripos students have had to grapple with.This event was designed to enrich the contract law tripos module and was particularly aimed at allowing Part IB students to supplement their lecture notes and further reading.For more information see the CULS website at: https://culs.org.ukThis entry provides an audio source for iTunes.

47mins

24 Jan 2020

Rank #10

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'Conscience, Religious Accommodations, and Religious Exemptions': John Corvino

The Cambridge Pro Bono Project (CPP) hosted this lecture in the CPP Colloquium Series, supported by the Centre for Public Law. The lecture was given by Professor John Corvino, at the Faculty of Law on 20 November 2017. He spoke about 'Conscience, Religious Accommodations, and Religious Exemptions'. The presentation for this lecture is available at:https://resources.law.cam.ac.uk/documents/Cambridge_Public_Lecture_Corvino_20_11_2017.pdfJohn Corvino is Professor of Philosophy and the incoming Dean of the Irvin D. Reid Honors College at Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan, USA. He is the author of numerous articles, as well as three books from Oxford University Press: Debating Same-Sex Marriage (with Maggie Gallagher, 2012), What's Wrong with Homosexuality? (2013), and Debating Religious Liberty and Discrimination (with Ryan T. Anderson and Sherif Girgis, 2017). He has lectured at over 250 campuses on topics of sexuality, marriage, and ethics. Read more at www.johncorvino.com. For more information on the Cambridge Pro Bono Project see https://www.law.cam.ac.uk/cpp

42mins

22 Nov 2017

Rank #11

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CELS #Brexit Myths podcast: Part 1

The Centre for European Legal Studies, University of Cambridge explores the common myths of #Brexit. In this exclusive podcast three academics from the Centre for European Legal Studies, University of Cambridge, give their verdicts on twelve common myths about the UK’s #Brexit from the EU. We speak to Professor Catherine Barnard, Professor of European Union Law and a Senior Fellow in the UK in a Changing Europe Programme; Dr Markus Gehring, University Lecturer in Law at the Law Faculty and former Deputy Director of the Centre for European Legal Studies and a Fellow of the Lauterpacht Centre for International Law; Professor John Bell, Professor of Law, University of Cambridge. In this two part #Brexitmyths documentary we ask them to tell you what is true and what isn’t when #Brexit is being discussed. First we speak to Professor Barnard and Dr Gehring and then Professor Bell to sum up his #Brexit myths at the end of each part. Below we give the questions we put to them and the approximate time codes for their answers so that if you want to dip into parts of this discussion it is easy for you to do so. We hope you enjoy the listen and learn much from it. Producer: Boni Sones OBE #Brexit Myths Part One• 0.00 The Withdrawal Agreement itself – it’s a bad deal? • 7.15 The EU got everything it wanted from the UK and took us for a ride? • 11.15 The NI backstop will keep the UK in a customs union indefinitely? • 14.49 May’s deal or No-Deal are the only two options? • 19.30 Trading on WTO terms will be good for the UK as we do more trade outside the EU than in it? • 23.43 The Political Agreement leading to a trade deal is too vague? #Brexit Myths Part Two • 0.00 We have 2 years to negotiate a trade deal when everything else will stay the same? • 5.15 The economy will dip but can make up ground later? • 12.00 By leaving the EU migration into the UK will reduce significantly? • 14.45 A Canada plus or EEA option will be able to deliver the government’s objectives? • 18.25 We have to reach a deal by 29th March 2019 or “crash out” of the EU and go it alone? • 19.45 We can’t revoke Article 50?

32mins

14 Jan 2019

Rank #12

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'R (Privacy International) v Investigatory Powers Tribunal': CPL Discussion - Mark Elliott and Alison Young (audio)

A discussion held at the University of Cambridge on 18 November 2019, with Sir Patrick Elias, Professor Mark Elliott, and Professor Alison Young. The event was hosted by the Centre for Public Law.In R (Privacy International) v Investigatory Powers Tribunal [2019] UKSC 22, the Supreme Court, by 4 judgments to 3, concluded that a clause removing judicial review of the court over decisions of the Investigatory Powers Tribunal (IPT), including those as to whether the IPT had jurisdiction, could not remove judicial review by the court for legal errors made by the IPT when determining its jurisdiction. The legislation could be interpreted so as not to remove review over purported decisions as to whether the IPT had jurisdiction – in other words those decisions tainted by a legal error. The individual judgments provide an array of arguments which have an impact on how courts interpret ouster clauses and legislation more generally, the foundations of judicial review, parliamentary sovereignty and the rule of law. This lecture explains the judgments and evaluates their implications.For more information see: https://www.cpl.law.cam.ac.uk/This entry provides an audio source for iTunes.

58mins

20 Nov 2019

Rank #13

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'Session 2: External Relations' - Markus Gehring: CELS Brexit Symposium

On 14 March 2019 the Centre for European Legal Studies (CELS) hosted a symposium to discuss the potential implications of Brexit. The aim of this event was to provide informed commentary on issues within the ongoing Brexit process (whatever they may be). Programme: Session 1: Free Movement of Persons and Establishment What are the consequences of the Brexit process for the immediate and future rights of EU citizens within the UK and UK citizens travelling to or working within the EU. This would cover both the right to work, the right to be self-employed, and the rights of those not in employment. Chair: John Bell Martin Steinfeld (University of Cambridge) Eleanor Spaventa (Bocconi University, Italy) Session 2: External Relations What is the effect of the Brexit process on the UK’s ability to conclude trade agreements? What are the potential frameworks within which these might be developed? Chair: Geoffrey Edwards (POLIS) Markus Gehring (University of Cambridge) Georges Baur (Liechtenstein Institute, Formerly EFTA) Session 3: Goods and Services What is the effect of present and proposed arrangements on the free movement of goods and services? How far are the UK and EU markets to be segmented and how will this affect trading across borders, notably that in Northern Ireland? Chair: Stephen Weatherill (University of Oxford) Laurence Gormley (University of Groningen) Gareth Davies (Vrije University, Amsterdam) Session 4: Competition Law How will the substantive rules and procedures on competition law and state aids be affected by the Brexit process in the short and medium term? Chair: Albertina Albors-Llorens (University of Cambridge) Oke Odudu (University of Cambridge) Tim Ward (Monckton Chambers)

32mins

14 Mar 2019

Rank #14

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'Session 1: Free Movement of Persons and Establishment' - Eleanor Spaventa: CELS Brexit Symposium

On 14 March 2019 the Centre for European Legal Studies (CELS) hosted a symposium to discuss the potential implications of Brexit. The aim of this event was to provide informed commentary on issues within the ongoing Brexit process (whatever they may be). Programme: Session 1: Free Movement of Persons and Establishment What are the consequences of the Brexit process for the immediate and future rights of EU citizens within the UK and UK citizens travelling to or working within the EU. This would cover both the right to work, the right to be self-employed, and the rights of those not in employment. Chair: John Bell Martin Steinfeld (University of Cambridge) Eleanor Spaventa (Bocconi University, Italy) Session 2: External Relations What is the effect of the Brexit process on the UK’s ability to conclude trade agreements? What are the potential frameworks within which these might be developed? Chair: Geoffrey Edwards (POLIS) Markus Gehring (University of Cambridge) Georges Baur (Liechtenstein Institute, Formerly EFTA) Session 3: Goods and Services What is the effect of present and proposed arrangements on the free movement of goods and services? How far are the UK and EU markets to be segmented and how will this affect trading across borders, notably that in Northern Ireland? Chair: Stephen Weatherill (University of Oxford) Laurence Gormley (University of Groningen) Gareth Davies (Vrije University, Amsterdam) Session 4: Competition Law How will the substantive rules and procedures on competition law and state aids be affected by the Brexit process in the short and medium term? Chair: Albertina Albors-Llorens (University of Cambridge) Oke Odudu (University of Cambridge) Tim Ward (Monckton Chambers)

27mins

15 Mar 2019

Rank #15

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Post-Brexit Options for the UK: New Legal Analysis

On 16 November 2018 the SRI (Strategic Research Initiative) and the CBR, the Centre for Business Research, University of Cambridge, held a conference at Peterhouse College in Cambridge on Brexit with the aim of encouraging interdisciplinary discussion amongst academics and further research on the implications of the UK leaving the EU for public policy.

57mins

22 Nov 2018

Rank #16

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'Making Markets Work: New Challenges for EU Competition Law': The 2019 Mackenzie-Stuart Lecture

The Centre for European Legal Studies (CELS) hosts an annual public lecture in honour of Lord Mackenzie-Stuart, the first British Judge to be President of the Court of Justice. Among the eminent scholars of European legal studies invited to give the lecture are Professor Joseph Weiler, former Judge David Edwards of the European Court of Justice, and Advocate-General Francis Jacobs of the European Court of Justice. The texts of the Mackenzie-Stuart Lectures are published in the Cambridge Yearbook of European Legal Studies. The 2019 Mackenzie-Stuart Lecture was delivered by Commissioner Margrethe Vestager, European Commission, under the title 'Making Markets Work: New Challenges for EU Competition Law' on 4 February 2019.More information about this lecture, including photographs from the event, is available from the Centre for European Legal Studies website at: https://www.cels.law.cam.ac.uk/mackenzie-stuart-lectures

35mins

6 Feb 2019

Rank #17

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'Session 4: Competition Law' - Tim Ward: CELS Brexit Symposium

On 14 March 2019 the Centre for European Legal Studies (CELS) hosted a symposium to discuss the potential implications of Brexit. The aim of this event was to provide informed commentary on issues within the ongoing Brexit process (whatever they may be). Programme: Session 1: Free Movement of Persons and Establishment What are the consequences of the Brexit process for the immediate and future rights of EU citizens within the UK and UK citizens travelling to or working within the EU. This would cover both the right to work, the right to be self-employed, and the rights of those not in employment. Chair: John Bell Martin Steinfeld (University of Cambridge) Eleanor Spaventa (Bocconi University, Italy) Session 2: External Relations What is the effect of the Brexit process on the UK’s ability to conclude trade agreements? What are the potential frameworks within which these might be developed? Chair: Geoffrey Edwards (POLIS) Markus Gehring (University of Cambridge) Georges Baur (Liechtenstein Institute, Formerly EFTA) Session 3: Goods and Services What is the effect of present and proposed arrangements on the free movement of goods and services? How far are the UK and EU markets to be segmented and how will this affect trading across borders, notably that in Northern Ireland? Chair: Stephen Weatherill (University of Oxford) Laurence Gormley (University of Groningen) Gareth Davies (Vrije University, Amsterdam) Session 4: Competition Law How will the substantive rules and procedures on competition law and state aids be affected by the Brexit process in the short and medium term? Chair: Albertina Albors-Llorens (University of Cambridge) Oke Odudu (University of Cambridge) Tim Ward (Monckton Chambers)

18mins

14 Mar 2019

Rank #18

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'Session 3: Goods and Services' - Gareth Davies: CELS Brexit Symposium

On 14 March 2019 the Centre for European Legal Studies (CELS) hosted a symposium to discuss the potential implications of Brexit. The aim of this event was to provide informed commentary on issues within the ongoing Brexit process (whatever they may be). Programme: Session 1: Free Movement of Persons and Establishment What are the consequences of the Brexit process for the immediate and future rights of EU citizens within the UK and UK citizens travelling to or working within the EU. This would cover both the right to work, the right to be self-employed, and the rights of those not in employment. Chair: John Bell Martin Steinfeld (University of Cambridge) Eleanor Spaventa (Bocconi University, Italy) Session 2: External Relations What is the effect of the Brexit process on the UK’s ability to conclude trade agreements? What are the potential frameworks within which these might be developed? Chair: Geoffrey Edwards (POLIS) Markus Gehring (University of Cambridge) Georges Baur (Liechtenstein Institute, Formerly EFTA) Session 3: Goods and Services What is the effect of present and proposed arrangements on the free movement of goods and services? How far are the UK and EU markets to be segmented and how will this affect trading across borders, notably that in Northern Ireland? Chair: Stephen Weatherill (University of Oxford) Laurence Gormley (University of Groningen) Gareth Davies (Vrije University, Amsterdam) Session 4: Competition Law How will the substantive rules and procedures on competition law and state aids be affected by the Brexit process in the short and medium term? Chair: Albertina Albors-Llorens (University of Cambridge) Oke Odudu (University of Cambridge) Tim Ward (Monckton Chambers)

23mins

14 Mar 2019

Rank #19

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'Government by decree - Covid-19 and the Constitution': The 2020 Cambridge Freshfields Lecture

On 27 October 2020 Lord Sumption delivered the 2020 Cambridge Freshfields Lecture entitled "Government by decree - Covid-19 and the Constitution".The disputes over Brexit last year saw an attempt to make the executive, not Parliament, the prime source of authority in the Constitution. The coronavirus crisis has provoked another attempt to marginalise Parliament, this time with the willing acquiescence of the House of Commons. Is this to be our future?Lord Sumption is an author, historian and lawyer of note. He was appointed directly from the practising Bar to the Supreme Court, and served as a Supreme Court Justice from 2012-18. In 2019, he delivered the BBC Reith Lectures, "Law and the Decline of Politics", and is now a regular commentator in the media. He continues to sit as a Non-Permanent Judge of the Hong Kong Court of Final Appeal. Alongside his career as a lawyer, he has also produced a substantial and highly-regarded narrative history of the Hundred Years' War between England and France (with volume V still to come).More information about this lecture, including a transcript, is available from the Private Law Centre website:https://www.privatelaw.law.cam.ac.uk/events/CambridgeFreshfieldsLecture

1hr 16mins

28 Oct 2020

Rank #20