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The best podcast episodes on global issues affecting everyone. Covering topics such as the #metoo movement, climate change, the impact of technology and some of the biggest global issues facing us right now. For anyone interested in learning more about the world, and some of the issues we're facing, pick an episode below and start listening! Add episodes you're interested into your queue below!

Read more

The best podcast episodes on global issues affecting everyone. Covering topics such as the #metoo movement, climate change, the impact of technology and some of the biggest global issues facing us right now. For anyone interested in learning more about the world, and some of the issues we're facing, pick an episode below and start listening! Add episodes you're interested into your queue below!

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Ray Kurzweil on what the future holds next

The TED Interview

Join Chris for a very special conversation with legendary inventor and computer scientist Ray Kurzweil, recorded live onstage at TED2018. Listen in to hear what the man who makes a living from predicting the future arc of technology thinks is coming our way next – including the specific prediction of when he thinks technology will finally gain human levels of language understanding. Find the transcript at: go.ted.com/interviewkurzweil

38mins

4 Dec 2018

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10.4- Historical Materialism

Revolutions

The history of all hitherto existing society is the history of class struggles? Come see us: Intelligent Speech Conference

33mins

10 Jun 2019

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War and Humanity

The Reith Lectures

Is war an essential part of being human? Are we destined to fight? That is the central question that historian Professor Margaret Macmillan addresses in five lectures recorded in the UK, Lebanon and in Canada. In her series, called The Mark of Cain, she will explore the tangled history of war and society and our complicated feelings towards it and towards those who fight.She begins by asking when wars first broke out. Did they start with the appearance of homo sapiens, or when human beings first organised themselves into larger groupings such as tribes, clans, or nations? She assesses how wars bring about change in society and, conversely, how social and political change influences how wars start and are fought. And she discusses that dark paradox of war: that it can bring benefits and progress. The programme is recorded before an audience at the BBC Radio Theatre in London and includes a question and answer session chaired by Anita Anand. Margaret MacMillan is emeritus professor of international history at Oxford University and professor of history at the University of Toronto. She says: "We like to think of war as an aberration, as the breakdown of the normal state of peace. This is comforting but wrong. War is deeply woven into the history of human society. Wherever we look in the past, no matter where or how far back we go, groups of people have organised themselves to protect their own territory or ways of life and, often, to attack those of others. Over the centuries we have deplored the results and struggled to tame war, even abolish it, while we have also venerated the warrior and talked of the nobility and grandeur of war. We all, as human beings, have something to say about war."Producer: Jim FrankEditor: Hugh Levinson.

42mins

26 Jun 2018

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Global Philosopher: Should there be any limits to free speech?

The Public Philosopher

Sixty people from around the world join Professor Michael Sandel in a digital studio at Harvard to discuss free speech. Free speech is a cornerstone of democracy and freedom of expression is regarded as a fundamental human right. But even in democracies there are disputes about the limits to free speech. And most countries have laws restricting free speech, such as libel laws, or laws controlling forms of pornography. But should limits be placed on free speech? Should people be allowed to say and write whatever they like, even if it is untrue and is deeply offensive to vulnerable individuals or groups? Professor Sandel unpicks the philosophy of free speech.Audience producer: Louise Coletta Producer: David Edmonds Executive Producer: Emma Rippon

41mins

6 Feb 2018

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Ep. 2 Glenn Greenwald On “Defending My Enemy”

So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast

In discussions about free speech issues, you’ll often hear people say something to the effect of, “I disapprove of what you say, but I’ll defend to the death your right to say it.” The quote is typically misattributed to the French Enlightenment thinker Voltaire. But proper crediting aside, the sentiment it expresses accurately reflects how many free speech advocates go about their work—including Glenn Greenwald. Greenwald is best known as one of the journalists who coordinated the 2013 National Security Agency revelations from whistleblower Edward Snowden. But before he became an award-winning journalist, he was a lawyer. And not just any lawyer: a First Amendment lawyer who, as a gay man of Jewish descent, defended the First Amendment rights of Neo-Nazis and white supremacists. This episode kicks off a two-part series on the topic of “defending my enemy” that will explore why people who vehemently oppose certain ideas nonetheless staunchly defend the right of others to express them. Follow us on Twitter: twitter.com/freespeechtalk Like us on Facebook: facebook.com/sotospeakpodcast Email us: sotospeak@thefire.org

35mins

19 May 2016

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Is the world getting better or worse? A look at the numbers | Steven Pinker

TED Talks Daily

Was 2017 really the "worst year ever," as some would have us believe? In his analysis of recent data on homicide, war, poverty, pollution and more, psychologist Steven Pinker finds that we're doing better now in every one of them when compared with 30 years ago. But progress isn't inevitable, and it doesn't mean everything gets better for everyone all the time, Pinker says. Instead, progress is problem-solving, and we should look at things like climate change and nuclear war as problems to be solved, not apocalypses in waiting. "We will never have a perfect world, and it would be dangerous to seek one," he says. "But there's no limit to the betterments we can attain if we continue to apply knowledge to enhance human flourishing."

18mins

17 Nov 2018

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A Founder of Facebook Says It’s Time to Break It Up

The Daily

Chris Hughes, a Facebook co-founder and Mark Zuckerberg’s college roommate, has written an Op-Ed in The New York Times saying that Mr. Zuckerberg has become too powerful and that Facebook should be broken up. Our colleague sits down with him to talk about why he’s speaking out. Guest: Kevin Roose, a technology writer for The Times who interviewed Mr. Hughes. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: “It’s been 15 years since I co-founded Facebook at Harvard, and I haven’t worked at the company in a decade,” Mr. Hughes writes in his Op-Ed. “But I feel a sense of anger and responsibility.”

10 May 2019

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What if we ended the injustice of bail? | Robin Steinberg

TED Talks Daily

On any given night, more than 450,000 people in the United States are locked up in jail simply because they don't have enough money to pay bail. The sums in question are often around $500: easy for some to pay, impossible for others. This has real human consequences -- people lose jobs, homes and lives, and it drives racial disparities in the legal system. Robin Steinberg has a bold idea to change this. In this powerful talk, she outlines the plan for The Bail Project -- an unprecedented national revolving bail fund to fight mass incarceration. (This ambitious idea is part of the Audacious Project, TED's initiative to inspire and fund global change.)

14mins

23 Nov 2018

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How to let go of being a "good" person -- and become a better person | Dolly Chugh

TED Talks Daily

What if your attachment to being a "good" person is holding you back from actually becoming a better person? In this accessible talk, social psychologist Dolly Chugh explains the puzzling psychology of ethical behavior -- like why it's hard to spot your biases and acknowledge mistakes -- and shows how the path to becoming better starts with owning your mistakes. "In every other part of our lives, we give ourselves room to grow -- except in this one, where it matters most," Chugh says.

11mins

1 Nov 2018

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The lies our culture tells us about what matters -- and a better way to live | David Brooks

TED Talks Daily

Our society is in the midst of a social crisis, says op-ed columnist and author David Brooks: we're trapped in a valley of isolation and fragmentation. How do we find our way out? Based on his travels across the United States -- and his meetings with a range of exceptional people known as "weavers" -- Brooks lays out his vision for a cultural revolution that empowers us all to lead lives of greater meaning, purpose and joy.

14mins

5 Jun 2019

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