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Alexander Nemerov

12 Podcast Episodes

Latest 13 Aug 2022 | Updated Daily

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Look at the beauty of the world as if you were looking at art - Interview with Alexander Nemerov @Stanford University

EVOLVE

What is the most beautiful thing you have ever seen? (Interview in English) What can we learn from art? How has it shaped us as humanity and how has our society shaped art? In today's episode, I talk with Professor Alexander Nemerov. He's a professor at Stanford University in Arts and Humanities. Some friends of mine who were also studying at Stanford University then, were so excited to attend his lecture that I've been looking forward to this conversation for a long time. Alexander is professor with passion and full of heart. It was very touching to listen to his theses and ideas and also to be able to talk to him about art and mindfulness. More about Alexander Nemerov: https://art.stanford.edu/people/alexander-nemerov Book recommendation:  The Magic Mountain by Thomas Mann Remembrance of Things Past by Marcel Proust  - - - - Was können wir von Kunst lernen? Wie hat es uns als Menschheit geprägt und wie hat unsere Gesellschaft die Kunst geprägt? In der heutigen Folge unterhalte ich mich mit Professor Alexander Nemerov. Er ist Professor an der Stanford University für Arts and Humanities. Einige Freunde von mir, die damals auch an der Stanford University studierten, waren so begeistert von seiner Vorlesung, dass ich mich sehr lange auf dieses Gespräch gefreut habe. Alexander ist Professor mit Leidenschaft und mit vollem Herzen dabei. Es war sehr berührend seinen Thesen und Ideen zuhören zu dürfen und auch mit ihm über Kunst und Achtsamkeit sprechen zu können. Du erfährst in dieser Folge: Warum dein beruflicher Titel nichts über dich als Person aussagt Wie du deine Ängste überwinden kannst Warum du unbedingt nach den schönen Momenten des Lebens Ausschau halten und sie mit ganzem Herzen erleben solltest  Ich freue mich sehr auf deine Gedanken zur Folge auf Instagram unter @jasminchiarabauer und über deine Bewertung auf iTunes! 💌Deine Jasmin ℹMehr Infos zu mir unter: www.jasminchiarabauer.de Instagram: @jasminchiarabauer Facebook LinkedIn — Jasmin-Chiara Bauer EVOLVE www.jasminchiarabauer.de

53mins

20 Oct 2021

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‘Fierce Poise: Helen Frankenthaler And 1950s New York’: Alexander Nemerov Explores Artist’s Life During Transformative Decade

Book Public

Alexander Nemerov brings us the story of pioneering artist Helen Frankenthaler and a look into New York’s 1950s art scene.

35mins

20 Aug 2021

Similar People

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Alexander Nemerov, "Fierce Poise: Helen Frankenthaler and 1950s New York" (Penguin Press, 2021)

New Books in Art

At the dawn of the 1950s, a promising and dedicated young painter named Helen Frankenthaler, fresh out of college, moved back home to New York City to make her name. By the decade's end, she had succeeded in establishing herself as an important American artist of the postwar period. In the years in between, she made some of the most daring, head-turning paintings of her day and also came into her own as a woman: traveling the world, falling in and out of love, and engaging in an ongoing artistic education. She also experienced anew—and left her mark on—the city in which she had been raised in privilege as the daughter of a judge, even as she left the security of that world to pursue her artistic ambitions.Brought to vivid life by acclaimed art historian Alexander Nemerov, these defining moments—from her first awed encounter with Jackson Pollock's drip paintings to her first solo gallery show to her tumultuous breakup with eminent art critic Clement Greenberg—comprise a portrait as bold and distinctive as the painter herself. Inspired by Pollock and the other male titans of abstract expressionism but committed to charting her own course, Frankenthaler was an artist whose talent was matched only by her unapologetic determination to distinguish herself in a man's world. Fierce Poise: Helen Frankenthaler and 1950s New York (Penguin Press, 2021) is an exhilarating ride through New York's 1950s art scene and a brilliant portrait of a young artist through the moments that shaped her.Allison Leigh is Assistant Professor of Art History and the SLEMCO/LEQSF Regents Endowed Professor in Art & Architecture at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. Her research explores masculinity in European and Russian art of the eighteenth through the early twentieth centuries. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/art

1hr

14 Jun 2021

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Alexander Nemerov, "Fierce Poise: Helen Frankenthaler and 1950s New York" (Penguin Press, 2021)

New Books in Biography

At the dawn of the 1950s, a promising and dedicated young painter named Helen Frankenthaler, fresh out of college, moved back home to New York City to make her name. By the decade's end, she had succeeded in establishing herself as an important American artist of the postwar period. In the years in between, she made some of the most daring, head-turning paintings of her day and also came into her own as a woman: traveling the world, falling in and out of love, and engaging in an ongoing artistic education. She also experienced anew—and left her mark on—the city in which she had been raised in privilege as the daughter of a judge, even as she left the security of that world to pursue her artistic ambitions.Brought to vivid life by acclaimed art historian Alexander Nemerov, these defining moments—from her first awed encounter with Jackson Pollock's drip paintings to her first solo gallery show to her tumultuous breakup with eminent art critic Clement Greenberg—comprise a portrait as bold and distinctive as the painter herself. Inspired by Pollock and the other male titans of abstract expressionism but committed to charting her own course, Frankenthaler was an artist whose talent was matched only by her unapologetic determination to distinguish herself in a man's world. Fierce Poise: Helen Frankenthaler and 1950s New York (Penguin Press, 2021) is an exhilarating ride through New York's 1950s art scene and a brilliant portrait of a young artist through the moments that shaped her.Allison Leigh is Assistant Professor of Art History and the SLEMCO/LEQSF Regents Endowed Professor in Art & Architecture at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. Her research explores masculinity in European and Russian art of the eighteenth through the early twentieth centuries. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/biography

1hr

14 Jun 2021

Most Popular

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Alexander Nemerov, "Fierce Poise: Helen Frankenthaler and 1950s New York" (Penguin Press, 2021)

New Books in Gender

At the dawn of the 1950s, a promising and dedicated young painter named Helen Frankenthaler, fresh out of college, moved back home to New York City to make her name. By the decade's end, she had succeeded in establishing herself as an important American artist of the postwar period. In the years in between, she made some of the most daring, head-turning paintings of her day and also came into her own as a woman: traveling the world, falling in and out of love, and engaging in an ongoing artistic education. She also experienced anew—and left her mark on—the city in which she had been raised in privilege as the daughter of a judge, even as she left the security of that world to pursue her artistic ambitions.Brought to vivid life by acclaimed art historian Alexander Nemerov, these defining moments—from her first awed encounter with Jackson Pollock's drip paintings to her first solo gallery show to her tumultuous breakup with eminent art critic Clement Greenberg—comprise a portrait as bold and distinctive as the painter herself. Inspired by Pollock and the other male titans of abstract expressionism but committed to charting her own course, Frankenthaler was an artist whose talent was matched only by her unapologetic determination to distinguish herself in a man's world. Fierce Poise: Helen Frankenthaler and 1950s New York (Penguin Press, 2021) is an exhilarating ride through New York's 1950s art scene and a brilliant portrait of a young artist through the moments that shaped her.Allison Leigh is Assistant Professor of Art History and the SLEMCO/LEQSF Regents Endowed Professor in Art & Architecture at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. Her research explores masculinity in European and Russian art of the eighteenth through the early twentieth centuries. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/gender-studies

1hr

14 Jun 2021

Episode artwork

Alexander Nemerov, "Fierce Poise: Helen Frankenthaler and 1950s New York" (Penguin Press, 2021)

New Books in Women's History

At the dawn of the 1950s, a promising and dedicated young painter named Helen Frankenthaler, fresh out of college, moved back home to New York City to make her name. By the decade's end, she had succeeded in establishing herself as an important American artist of the postwar period. In the years in between, she made some of the most daring, head-turning paintings of her day and also came into her own as a woman: traveling the world, falling in and out of love, and engaging in an ongoing artistic education. She also experienced anew—and left her mark on—the city in which she had been raised in privilege as the daughter of a judge, even as she left the security of that world to pursue her artistic ambitions.Brought to vivid life by acclaimed art historian Alexander Nemerov, these defining moments—from her first awed encounter with Jackson Pollock's drip paintings to her first solo gallery show to her tumultuous breakup with eminent art critic Clement Greenberg—comprise a portrait as bold and distinctive as the painter herself. Inspired by Pollock and the other male titans of abstract expressionism but committed to charting her own course, Frankenthaler was an artist whose talent was matched only by her unapologetic determination to distinguish herself in a man's world. Fierce Poise: Helen Frankenthaler and 1950s New York (Penguin Press, 2021) is an exhilarating ride through New York's 1950s art scene and a brilliant portrait of a young artist through the moments that shaped her.Allison Leigh is Assistant Professor of Art History and the SLEMCO/LEQSF Regents Endowed Professor in Art & Architecture at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. Her research explores masculinity in European and Russian art of the eighteenth through the early twentieth centuries. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

1hr

14 Jun 2021

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FIERCE POISE by Alexander Nemerov, read by Alison Fraser

Behind the Mic with AudioFile Magazine

Narrator Alison Fraser’s ability to deliver character voices and accents is on display in this biography of mid-twentieth-century painter Helen Frankenthaler. Host Jo Reed and AudioFile’s Alan Minskoff talk about this audiobook by Alexander Nemerov, which is at once an appreciation of a major figure and a close look at the avant-garde scene of 1950s New York City. Fraser narrates with skill, capturing the times with excellent imitations, most notably Frankenthaler’s airy upper-class sounding speech. Read the full review of the audiobook on AudioFile’s website. Published by Penguin Audio.Find more audiobook recommendations at audiofilemagazine.comSupport for AudioFile's Behind the Mic comes from PENGUIN RANDOM HOUSE AUDIO, dedicated to producing top-quality fiction and nonfiction audiobooks written and read by the best in the business. Visit penguinrandomhouseaudio.com/audiofile now to start listening. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

7mins

13 May 2021

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Alexander Nemerov, FIERCE POISE

Moms Don’t Have Time to Read Books™️

"There is no other reason to write about art unless you have strong feelings about it. That's a given." Stanford University Art History Professor Alexander Nemerov and Zibby discuss how he came to write his latest book, Fierce Poise: Helen Frankenthaler and 1950s New York, the book's creative structure, and his advice for anyone looking to write about art.Purchase your copy on Amazon or Bookshop Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

22mins

24 Mar 2021

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#3 How to look at life and why (with Alexander Nemerov)

Ein Pod Kaffee

Alexander Nemerov is the Chair of the Department of Art and Art History at Stanford University. Throughout our recording, it became apparent that a lot of his work is analyzing fiction and poetry alongside visual art. His nuanced language drew pictures of life that visualized his beliefs and experiences. It was a beautiful, at times maybe even overwhelming talk due to the abundance of thoughts to ponder upon, leaving us thankful and excited. We talked to him about his eventful path of life and the influences of his famous father and aunt, how not knowing can be a guidestar for life and about the beauty of ordinary moments and what to take from them. And of course about art. The book he talks about in the podcast: George Elliot - Middle March Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/einpodkaffee)

48mins

8 Apr 2020

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Alexander Nemerov and Clifford Ross on Helen Frankenthaler - 8/23/19

The Parrish Art Museum Podcast

August 23rd, 2019 Introduced by Alicia G. Longwell, Ph.D. The Lewis B. and Dorothy Cullman Chief Curator, this  conversation brings together art historian Alexander Nemerov, who is working on a new book about Frankenthaler, and multi-media artist Clifford Ross. Nemerov is the Carl and Marilyn Thoma Provostial Professor in the Arts and Humanities as well as Chair of the Department of Art and Art History at Stanford University. Ross is a multi-media artist whose work has been widely exhibited in galleries, museums, and public spaces in the United States and abroad and is the Chairman of the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation. Our Friday Night programs at the Parrish are made possible, in part, by presenting sponsor Bank of America, with additional support provided by The Corcoran Group and Sandy and Stephen Perlbinder.

59mins

3 Sep 2019

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