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James Joyce

90 Podcast Episodes

Latest 7 Dec 2022 | Updated Daily

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The Dead by James Joyce

Classic Ghost Stories

The Dead is is the last story, and the longest from James Joyce's 1914 short stories collection: Dubliners. It is longer than the rest, being more like a novella. It is considered one of the classics of Irish literature, and possibly the best literary short fiction in the English language.Dubliners is a rich and generous story and though Joyce was considered a pioneer of modernist literature, with his 1922 novel Ulysses and especially with Finnegans Wake in 1939.Joyce left Ireland in 1904 and lived abroad in Trieste, Switzerland and Paris and never really lived in Dublin again but his books and all his writing are set among the people and places he grew up amongst.See a full analysis and summary here: https://www.ghostpod.org/2022/11/05/the-dead-by-james-joyce-analysis/This audio book reading is by Tony Walker of The Classic Ghost Stories Podcast.  It was made into a film in 1987, by John Huston starring Anjelica Huston and Donal McCann. Download my narrations of some stories at my Bandcamp sitehttps://theclassicghoststoriespodcast.bandcamp.com/Visit the Website For Story Noteshttps://www.ghostpod.org/2022/11/05/the-dead-by-james-joyce-analysis/New Patreon RequestBuzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREESupport the showVisit us here: www.ghostpod.orgBuy me a coffee if you're glad I do this: https://ko-fi.com/tonywalkerIf you really want to help me, become a Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/barcudMusic by The Heartwood Institute: https://bit.ly/somecomeback

1hr 59mins

18 Nov 2022

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Ep. 122: James Joyce's ULYSSES with Frankie Gaffney

Ultraculture With Jason Louv

ULYSSES by James Joyce is not only one of the greatest novels ever written (perhaps THE greatest), but also a watershed in the development of Western consciousness. Its sprawling, Hermetic, often explicitly magical narrative explores the profound resonances of a single day, eternity in a grain of sand.  For this episode, Irish novelist Frankie Gaffney returns to discuss Ulysses and its profound cultural impact, and just in time for the one hundreth anniversary of the publication of the book. For more, check out Magick.Me, my online school for magick, meditation, and mysticism—see more at www.magick.me...!

1hr 27mins

29 Aug 2022

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Ulysses by James Joyce ~ Full Audiobook

Classic Audiobook Collection

Ulysses by James Joyce audiobook. Still one of the most radical novels of the 20th Century, James Joyce's Ulysses is considered to have ushered in the era of the modern novel. Loosely based on Homer's Odyssey, the book follows Leopold Bloom and a number of other characters through an ordinary day, twenty four hours, in Dublin, on June 16, 1904. The text is dense and difficult, but perfectly suited to an oral reading, filled with language tricks, puns and jokes, stream of consciousness, and bawdiness.--- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/matthew-jackson95/support

1hr

9 Aug 2022

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Dubliners by James Joyce ~ Full Audiobook

Classic Audiobook Collection

Dubliners by James Joyce audiobook. Masterful short stories about life in Dublin at the turn of the century, by James Joyce.--- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/matthew-jackson95/support

7hr 16mins

8 Aug 2022

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Anthony Burgess and James Joyce: Blooms of Dublin

The International Anthony Burgess Foundation Podcast

It’s June 2022 and we’re celebrating the hundredth anniversary of the publication of James Joyce’s Ulysses with a series of podcasts exploring Anthony Burgess’s love of the novel. In this episode, the Burgess Foundation's Will Carr tells the story of Blooms of Dublin, Burgess's musical adaptation of Ulysses which was first performed in Dublin in 1982 to mark the centenary of Joyce's birth. The episode contains recordings of Burgess talking about how he adapted such a complex novel into a stage musical, an interview with Frank Grimes, who played Stephen Dedalus in the production, and new recordings of several of the songs from Blooms of Dublin.The songs performed in this episode are:'Today' – a song that celebrates Bloomsday, 16 June 1904, the day on which the novel takes place. This takes place on a Dublin street. Leopold Bloom, a baritone, sings a relaxed ballad in which he anticipates meeting someone new on this otherwise ordinary day. Owen Gilhooly sings the part of Bloom.'Four O'Clock Tea' – Leopold Bloom’s wife is Molly Bloom, a professional soprano singer. While Bloom is out in the street, she is waking up in bed, and her song ‘Four O’Clock Tea’ anticipates meeting her lover that afternoon, Blazes Boylan. Bloom surprises her halfway through with her breakfast on a tray, and is furious to learn that Boylan will be visiting. Rachel Croash sings the part of Molly.'Paris is a Lamp Lit for Lovers' – Stephen Dedalus, who is visiting a brothel with Bloom, describes his adventures in Paris, and the music moves from a gentle ballad to a lively cancan, and back again. The part of Stephen is sung by Philip O’Connor.'Final Scene' – an extract from the 17-minute finale of Blooms of Dublin, sung by Molly Bloom as she reprises many of the numbers of the play and mixes them with new material in a musical recreation of Joyce's famous virtuoso monologue that ends the novel. Once again, Rachel Croash takes the part of Molly.The piano on all of these songs is played by David Jones. The musical director is Richard Strivens and the sound engineer is Sam Gee.-------For more information on Anthony Burgess and to find out how you can support our work, visit the Burgess Foundation online.Don't forget to leave us a review and subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

32mins

15 Jun 2022

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Anthony Burgess and James Joyce: Burgess Goes to Dublin

The International Anthony Burgess Foundation Podcast

It’s June 2022 and we’re celebrating the hundredth anniversary of the publication of James Joyce’s Ulysses with a series of podcasts exploring Anthony Burgess’s love of the novel. In this episode, Andrew Biswell of the Burgess Foundation looks at Burgess’s formative visits to Dublin, and how his passion for Joyce’s work led to his television documentary, Silence, Exile and Cunning.Find out how Burgess first discovered the work of James Joyce, how it chimed with his own experiences as a lapsed Catholic, and how he ended up visiting the ruins of Leopold Bloom's home in Dublin. You can also hear Burgess read from A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, and hear Burgess's thoughts on Joyce and Dublin in archive recordings.This episode was written and narrated by Andrew BiswellFor more on Anthony Burgess and to find out how you can support the work of the Burgess Foundation, visit out website.If you have enjoyed this episode, don't forget to leave us a review and subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

20mins

8 Jun 2022

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James Joyce in Russian Literature - Episode No. 45

Feeling Bookish Podcast

Roman talks with José Vergara about Joyce's influence on Soviet and post-Soviet Russian literature. We talk literary heritage, the dangers of translating Ulysses under Stalin, the birth of Social Realism (and its ugly stepsister, Capitalist Primitivism), the schizophrenic nature of the late Soviet period, émigré writing, and Joyce's continued influence on contemporary Russian writers. A fascinating talk that sheds much light on both Joyce and Russian lit.Writers discussed include: Yury Olesha, Vladimir Nabokov, Andrei Bitov, Sasha Sokolov, and Mikhail Shishkin (cameos of sorts by Victor Pelevin and William Gaddis). José's book, "All future plunges to the past : James Joyce in Russian literature," was published by Cornell University Press in 2021. https://www.cornellpress.cornell.edu/book/9781501759901/all-future-plunges-to-the-past/

1hr 27mins

1 Jun 2022

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Dubliners, by James Joyce. Part III.

Great Audiobooks

Dubliners is a collection of 15 short stories by James Joyce, first published in 1914. They form a naturalistic depiction of Irish middle class life in and around Dublin in the early years of the 20th century. The stories were written when Irish nationalism was at its peak and a search for a national identity and purpose was raging; at a crossroads of history and culture, Ireland was jolted by various converging ideas and influences. They centre on Joyce's idea of an epiphany: a moment where a character experiences self-understanding or illumination.Many of the characters in Dubliners later appear in minor roles in Joyce's novel Ulysses. The initial stories in the collection are narrated by child protagonists, and as the stories continue, they deal with the lives and concerns of progressively older people. This is in line with Joyce's tripartite division of the collection into childhood, adolescence, maturity, and public life. (From Wikipedia).Advertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brandsPrivacy & Opt-Out: https://redcircle.com/privacy

2hr 18mins

26 May 2022

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Dubliners, by James Joyce. Part II.

Great Audiobooks

Dubliners is a collection of 15 short stories by James Joyce, first published in 1914. They form a naturalistic depiction of Irish middle class life in and around Dublin in the early years of the 20th century. The stories were written when Irish nationalism was at its peak and a search for a national identity and purpose was raging; at a crossroads of history and culture, Ireland was jolted by various converging ideas and influences. They centre on Joyce's idea of an epiphany: a moment where a character experiences self-understanding or illumination.Many of the characters in Dubliners later appear in minor roles in Joyce's novel Ulysses. The initial stories in the collection are narrated by child protagonists, and as the stories continue, they deal with the lives and concerns of progressively older people. This is in line with Joyce's tripartite division of the collection into childhood, adolescence, maturity, and public life. (From Wikipedia).Advertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brandsPrivacy & Opt-Out: https://redcircle.com/privacy

1hr 57mins

26 May 2022

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Dubliners, by James Joyce. Part I.

Great Audiobooks

Dubliners is a collection of 15 short stories by James Joyce, first published in 1914. They form a naturalistic depiction of Irish middle class life in and around Dublin in the early years of the 20th century. The stories were written when Irish nationalism was at its peak and a search for a national identity and purpose was raging; at a crossroads of history and culture, Ireland was jolted by various converging ideas and influences. They centre on Joyce's idea of an epiphany: a moment where a character experiences self-understanding or illumination.Many of the characters in Dubliners later appear in minor roles in Joyce's novel Ulysses. The initial stories in the collection are narrated by child protagonists, and as the stories continue, they deal with the lives and concerns of progressively older people. This is in line with Joyce's tripartite division of the collection into childhood, adolescence, maturity, and public life. (From Wikipedia).Advertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brandsPrivacy & Opt-Out: https://redcircle.com/privacy

2hr 23mins

26 May 2022

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