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Mary Ellen Dello Stritto

16 Podcast Episodes

Latest 4 Apr 2021 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

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[From the Archives] Ep 173: Dr. Mary Ellen Dello Stritto and Stephania Fregosi on Data and Methods in Sustainability Research

Research in Action | A podcast for faculty & higher education professionals on research design, methods, productivity & more

On this episode, guest host Dr. Mary Ellen Dello Stritto is joined by Stephania Fregosi, Sustainability Analyst at Portland Community College. In her role, Stephania completes greenhouse gas inventories, the Sustainability, Tracking, and Rating system report, does research, and provides other support for the college. She earned her Master’s Degree in Environmental Law from the Vermont Law School and her Bachelor of Arts in Environmental Studies from Oberlin College. Stephania has worked in a variety of sustainability roles including sustainability coordination, project management, environmental assessment, community development, and environmental education. She has a passion for social justice, equity, and inclusion and recently served on the Diversity & Inclusion Committee as part of the advisory board of the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education. Segment 1: Data use and Methods in Sustainability [00:00-16:47] In this first segment, Stephania discusses what data and methods she uses in her role as a sustainability analyst. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Sustainability Tracking, Assessment & Rating System (STARS) Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Economic Input-Output Life Cycle Assessment Segment 2: Analysis and Decision Making [16:48-35:38] In segment two, Stephania discusses data analysis and the role of data in her work. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: State Renewable Portfolio Standards Economic Input-Output Life Cycle Assessment Oregon Department of Environmental Quality Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Second Nature Climate Council Greenhouse Gas Protocol Sustainable Purchasing Leadership Council To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, post a comment below or contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.

35mins

14 Sep 2020

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[From the Archives] Ep 160: Dr. Mary Ellen Dello Stritto and Dr. Stephen Jenkins on Academic Advising Online

Research in Action | A podcast for faculty & higher education professionals on research design, methods, productivity & more

On this episode, guest host Dr. Mary Ellen Dello Stritto, is joined by Stephen Jenkins. Stephen is the Interim Executive Director of University Housing and Dining Services at Oregon State University. He has 18 years of experience in higher education student affairs at several institutions. Stephen recently completed his Doctorate of Education in Educational Leadership – Post-secondary Education. For his dissertation, he studied the academic advising experiences and learning of online learners. Segment 1: Academic Advising for Online Learners [00:00-11:19] In this first segment, Stephen shares about the background research on online academic advising. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Curry, R. F. (1997). Academic advising in distance education (Doctoral dissertation). The College of William and Mary in Virginia. Retrieve from https://www.learntechlib.org/p/118296/ Moore, M. G. (Ed.). (2013). Handbook of distance education (3rd ed.). New York: Routledge. Segment 2: Methodological Approach [11:20-23:19] In segment two, Stephen discusses the theoretical background and methodological approach. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Crookston, B. B. (1972). A developmental view of academic advising as teaching, Journal of College Student Personnel, 13(1), 12-17. O’Banion, T. (1994). An academic advising model. NACADA Journal, 14(2), 10-16. Smith, C. L., & Allen, J. M. (2006). Essential functions of academic advising: What students want and get. NACADA Journal 26(1), pp. 56-66. Segment 3: Overall Findings and Implications [23:20-38:50] In segment three, Stephen shares about his overall findings in his research on academic advising for online learners. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Smith, C. L., & Allen, J. M. (2006). Essential functions of academic advising: What students want and get. NACADA Journal 26(1), pp. 56-66. Moore, M. G. (Ed.). (2013). Handbook of distance education (3rd ed.). New York: Routledge. To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, post a comment below or contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.

38mins

31 Aug 2020

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[From the Archives] Ep 145: Dr. Mary Ellen Dello Stritto and Dr. Mimi Recker on Learning Analytics and Big Data

Research in Action | A podcast for faculty & higher education professionals on research design, methods, productivity & more

On this episode, guest host Dr. Mary Ellen Dello Stritto is joined by Mimi Recker, a professor in the department of Instructional Technology and Learning Sciences at Utah State University. She holds a bachelor’s degree in mathematics from the University of Pennsylvania. After a few years working as a software engineer in Silicon Valley (working on early Internet protocols), she earned her PhD from the University of California, Berkeley. Mimi worked for two years at the Georgia Institute of Technology and for four years at Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand, before finally joining Utah State University in 1998. Mimi became Department Head of Instructional Technology & Learning Sciences in 2008, serving for 7 years. Her research focuses on helping the education sector take advantage of the benefits of cyber-learning and teaching. Over the years, this line of research, funded by the National Science Foundation and the Institute for Museum and Library Services, has involved a dynamic mix of faculty, post-docs, and graduate students from Utah State University, as well as colleagues from around the world. When not working, you might find her on skis, in a kayak, on a bike, or on a cliff, exploring the natural beauty around Logan. Segment 1: Learning Sciences and Analytics [00:00-19:10] In this first segment, Mimi discusses the field of learning sciences, learning analytics in higher education, and big vs. traditional data sets. Segment 2: Analyzing Big Data [19:10-35:06] In segment two, Mimi shares statistical approaches for analyzing big data sets and her research on LMS data. To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, post a comment below or contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.

36mins

17 Aug 2020

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[From the Archives] Ep 133: Dr. Mary Ellen Dello Stritto and Dr. M. Brooke Robertshaw on Effect Sizes

Research in Action | A podcast for faculty & higher education professionals on research design, methods, productivity & more

On this episode, Dr. Mary Ellen Dello Stritto is joined by Brooke Robertshaw, PhD, an assistant professor and the assessment librarian at Oregon State University. Her current research interests revolve around the ethics of learning analytics with a particular interest in the contextual nature of quantitative methodologies. Brooke is a member of the Data Doubles team that is exploring student perspectives of learning analytics. She is passionate about quantitative literacy, social justice, and the intersection of the two. In her spare time, she enjoys whitewater and flat water kayaking, discovering ways to give voice to the voiceless of the diaspora in the Middle East, and traveling to Jordan to spend time with her dear friends there. Segment 1: The Importance of Effect Sizes [00:00-15:28] In this first segment, Brooke discusses effect sizes, how they are used, and why they are important. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: American Psychological Association (APA) Segment 2: Best Practices for Using Effect Sizes [15:29-28:41] In segment two, Brooke discusses best practices for using effect sizes and resources to learn more. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Resources on effect sizes: Coe, R. (2002, September 12-14). It’s the effect size, stupid: What effect size is and why it is important. Paper presented at Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, University of Exeter, England. Dr. M. Brooke Robertshaw’s website: stats.brookerobertshaw.com Campbellcollaboration.org esfree.usu.edu To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, post a comment below or contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.

28mins

3 Aug 2020

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[From the Archive] Ep 116: Dr. Mary Ellen Dello Stritto and Dr. Mary Kite on Validity, Sampling, and Meta-analysis

Research in Action | A podcast for faculty & higher education professionals on research design, methods, productivity & more

On this episode, Dr. Mary Ellen Dello Stritto is joined by Dr. Mary Kite. Mary Kite received her B.A., M.S., and Ph.D. from Purdue University. A social psychologist, she is currently Professor of Social Psychology at Ball State University. Strongly committed to psychology education at all levels, she is Past-President of The Society for the Teaching of Psychology (STP, APA Division 2); she has held a number of other leadership roles for STP. She also chaired the APA Presidential Task Force on Diversity Education Resources and is Past President of the Midwestern Psychological Association. She is a Fellow of APA Divisions 2, 8, 9, 35, & 44 and of the Association for Psychological Science and the Midwestern Psychological Association. She maintains an active research program in the area of stereotyping and prejudice, including co-authoring The Psychology of Prejudice and Discrimination (3e) with Bernard Whitley, Jr.; Kite and Whitley also co-authored Principles of Research in Behavioral Science (4e). Recognitions include the Charles L. Brewer Award for Distinguished Teaching in Psychology from the American Psychological Foundation (2014) and a Presidential Citation from the Society for the Teaching of Psychology (2011). She was selected as a G. Stanley Hall Lecturer for the American Psychological Association in 2009 and was named a Minority Access National Role Model in 2007. Segment 1: External Validity [00:00-08:03] In this first segment, Dr. Kite discusses the importance of external validity in experimental research. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Kite, M. E., & Whitley, Jr., B. E.(2016). The psychology of prejudice and discrimination (3rd ed.). New York: Routledge. Kite, M. E., & Whitley, Jr., B. E. (2018). Principles of research in behavioral science (4th ed.). New York: Routledge. Darley, J. M., & Latané, B. (1968). Bystander intervention in emergencies: Diffusion of responsibility. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 8, 377-383. Piliavin, I. M., Rodin, J., & Piliavin, J. A. (1969). Good Samaritanism: An underground phenomenon? Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 13, 289-299. Ebbinghaus’ research on nonsense syllables Segment 2: Sampling [08:04-18:12] In segment two, Dr. Kite discusses sampling issues in quantitative research methods. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Arnett, J. (2008). The neglected 95%: Why American psychology needs to become less American. American Psychologist, 67, 602-614. Fraley, R. C. (2007). Using the Internet for personality research. In R. W. Robins, R. C. Fraley, & R. F. Krueger (Eds.), Handbook of research methods in personality psychology (pp. 130-148). New York: Guilford. Henrich, J., Heine, S. J. & Norenzayan, A. (2010). The weirdest people in the world? Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 33, 61-135. Henry, P. J. (2008). College sophomores in the laboratory redux: Influences of a narrow data base on social psychology’s view of the nature of prejudice. Psychological Inquiry, 19, 49-71. Kraut, R., Olson, J., Banaji, M., Bruckman, A., Cohen, J., & Couper, M. (2004). Psychological research online: Report of Board of Scientific Affairs’ Advisory Group on the conduct of research on the Internet. American Psychologist, 59, 105-117. Rosenthal, R., & Rosnow, R. L. (1975). The volunteer subject. New York: Wiley. Amazon Mechanical Turk Qualitrics To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, post a comment below or contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.

31mins

20 Jul 2020

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[From the Archives] Ep 109: Dr. Mary Ellen Dello Stritto and Patrick Aldrich on Non-parametric Statistics

Research in Action | A podcast for faculty & higher education professionals on research design, methods, productivity & more

On this episode, Dr. Mary Ellen Dello Stritto is joined by Patrick Aldrich. Patrick received his bachelor’s degree in Wildlife biology and a minor in Entomology from the University of California, Davis. After graduation, he spent 5 years in various field biology positions, studying a wide array subjects from Bowerbird mating systems in Australia to integrated pest management of ground squirrels in Northern California. He subsequently decided to return to school to pursue a PhD at the University of Hawaii, Manoa, where he studied the spatio-temporal variation of pollination networks in Hawaiian tropical dry forests. Following his graduate work, he was the project director for a project that used spatial analyses to study the random correspondence of fingerprint patterns. Through his work, he has acquired extensive experience in biostatistics. He is currently the data manager and statistician for the Oregon Quality Rating and Improvement System for early childhood and other projects at The Research Institute at Western Oregon University. He continues to apply parametric, non-parametric and likelihood methodologies to analyze various datasets associated with early childhood and educational research. Segment 1: Parametric vs. Non-parametric statistical tests [00:00-18:52] In this first segment, Patrick discusses the differences between parametric and non-parametric statistical tests and the best practices for using non-parametric tests. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: RIA # 91: Dr. Mary Ellen Dello Stritto and Dr. William D. Marelich on the Applied Quantitative Perspective Segment 2: Using non-parametric tests [18:53-33:31] In segment two, Patrick discusses how he uses non-parametric statistical tests in his research and how other researchers have used them. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Anderson, M. J. (2001). A new method for non-parametric multivariate analysis. Austral Ecology 26, 32-46. Oregon’s Quality Rating Improvement System (QRIS) Mann-Whitney U test Additional resources on non-parametric statistics: Wasserman, Larry (2007). All of nonparametric statistics. New York: Springer. Conover, W. J. (1999). Practical nonparametric statistics (3rd ed.). New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Siegel, S. & Castellan Jr., N. J. (1989). Nonparametric statistics for the behavioral sciences (2nd ed.). McGraw-Hill. To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, post a comment below or contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.

33mins

6 Jul 2020

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[From the Archives] Ep 91: Dr. Mary Ellen Dello Stritto and Dr. William Marelich on the Applied Quantitative Perspective

Research in Action | A podcast for faculty & higher education professionals on research design, methods, productivity & more

n this episode, Dr. Mary Ellen Dello Stritto is joined by Dr. William D. Marelich, a Professor of Psychology at California State University, Fullerton, and consulting statistician for Health Risk Reduction Projects, Integrative Substance Abuse Programs, Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles. His research interests and publications address decision-making strategies in health settings, patient/provider interactions, HIV/AIDS, and statistical/methodological approaches in experimental and applied research. Dr. Marelich is coauthor of the book “The Social Psychology of Health: Essays and Readings” and is an Editorial Board Member of the International Journal of Adolescence and Youth. He also has an interest in Sports Psychology with applications to baseball. Segment 1: Applied Quantitative Perspective [00:00-10:43] In this first segment, William discusses the applied quantitative perspective in research. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Marelich, W. D., & Erger, J. S. (Eds.). (2004). The social psychology of health: Essays and readings. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications. International Journal of Adolescence and Youth Segment 2: Key Quantitative Concepts [10:44-19:38] In segment two, William offers his perspective on key statistical concepts to understand for reading research reports and publications. Segment 3: On the Statistical Horizon [19:39-28:35] In segment three, William discusses statistical software and the concepts of p-hacking and p-curves. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: R (free statistical software) IBM SPSS  SAS Articles related to p-Curve and p-Hacking: Cumming, G. (2016). A primer on p-Hacking. MethodSpace. Retrieved from https://www.methodspace.com/primer-p-hacking/ Bruns S. B., & Ioannidis, J. P. A. (2016). p-Curve and p-Hacking in observational research. PLoS ONE 11(2): e0149144. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0149144 To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, post a comment below or contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Ecampus or Oregon State University.

28mins

22 Jun 2020

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Ep 185: Dr. Mary Ellen Dello Stritto and Dr. Kathleen Preston on Item Response Theory

Research in Action | A podcast for faculty & higher education professionals on research design, methods, productivity & more

On this episode, Dr. Mary Ellen Dello Stritto is joined by Dr. Kathleen Preston, an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at California State University, Fullerton. Dr. Preston teaches several statistics courses including introductory, advanced, and multivariate statistics, as well as psychometrics, and structural equation modeling. She earned her Ph.D. in 2011 in quantitative psychology from UCLA. Her research interests are in using Item Response Theory, specifically the nominal response model, to develop and refine psychological measurement tools. Dr. Preston is co-director of the Fullerton Longitudinal Study where she applies advanced statistical techniques to long-term longitudinal data. Dr. Preston is considered an expert in statistical analysis using R programming and she has recently published a textbook on analyzing multivariate statistics using R. She has given numerous invited statistical presentations and workshops at national and regional conferences, universities, and federal government agencies. Segment 1: Psychometrics and Item Response Theory [00:00-20:11] In this first segment, Kathleen discusses psychometrics, and how she got interested in quantitative psychology; she explains item response theory and the nominal response model and their applications. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Item Response Theory Nominal Response Model Segment 2: Analysis of the Fullerton Longitudinal Study [20:12 -37:44] In segment two, Kathleen discusses the Fullerton Longitudinal Study, the benefits and drawbacks of the study and the statistical methods she employs in her research. In this segment the following resources are mentioned: Fullerton Longitudinal Study Some of Kathleen's publications on the nominal response model and the Fullerton Longitudinal Study: Preston, K., Parral, S., Gottfried, A.W, Oliver, P., Gottfried, A. E., Ibrahim, S. & Delany, D. (2015). Applying the Nominal Response Model Within a Longitudinal Framework to Construct the Positive Family Relationships Scale. Educational and Psychological Measurement, 75, 901-930. Preston, K. S. J., Gottfried, A. W., Park, J. J., Manapat, P. D., Gottfried, A. E., & Oliver, P. H. (2018). Simultaneous Linking of Cross-Informant and Longitudinal Data Involving Positive Family Relationships. Educational and Psychological Measurement, 78(3), 409–429. To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, post a comment below or contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.

37mins

17 Feb 2020

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Ep 180: Dr. Mary Ellen Dello Stritto and Dane Skinner on Forecasting and Data Dashboards

Research in Action | A podcast for faculty & higher education professionals on research design, methods, productivity & more

On this episode, Mary Ellen is joined by Dane Skinner, a Research Analyst for Ecampus at Oregon State University. Prior to this position, Dane worked as a Data Scientist for the Oregon State Lottery. He completed his Masters in Math and Masters in Statistics at Oregon State University in 2016. When he's not working through data problems, he enjoys spending time with family, running through the trails of the MacDonald Forest, and building furniture. Segment 1: Forecasting with Data [00:00-15:31] In this first segment, Dane discusses data analysis for the Oregon Lottery and OSU Ecampus. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Time Series Analysis: http://www.statsoft.com/textbook/time-series-analysis Segment 2: Data Dashboards & Decision Making [15:32-29:05] In segment two, Dane discusses the advantages and disadvantages of data dashboards. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Shiny Storyboard: https://rmarkdown.rstudio.com/flexdashboard/layouts.html#storyboard Example: https://beta.rstudioconnect.com/jjallaire/htmlwidgets-showcase-storyboard/htmlwidgets-showcase-storyboard.html Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-4:15]: Dane’s Background and Professional Pathway To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, post a comment below or contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.

29mins

18 Nov 2019

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Ep 173: Dr. Mary Ellen Dello Stritto and Stephania Fregosi on Data and Methods in Sustainability Research

Research in Action | A podcast for faculty & higher education professionals on research design, methods, productivity & more

On this episode, guest host Dr. Mary Ellen Dello Stritto is joined by Stephania Fregosi, Sustainability Analyst at Portland Community College. In her role, Stephania completes greenhouse gas inventories, the Sustainability, Tracking, and Rating system report, does research, and provides other support for the college. She earned her Master’s Degree in Environmental Law from the Vermont Law School and her Bachelor of Arts in Environmental Studies from Oberlin College. Stephania has worked in a variety of sustainability roles including sustainability coordination, project management, environmental assessment, community development, and environmental education. She has a passion for social justice, equity, and inclusion and recently served on the Diversity & Inclusion Committee as part of the advisory board of the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education. Segment 1: Data use and Methods in Sustainability [00:00-16:47] In this first segment, Stephania discusses what data and methods she uses in her role as a sustainability analyst. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Sustainability Tracking, Assessment & Rating System (STARS) Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Economic Input-Output Life Cycle Assessment Segment 2: Analysis and Decision Making [16:48-35:38] In segment two, Stephania discusses data analysis and the role of data in her work. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: State Renewable Portfolio Standards Economic Input-Output Life Cycle Assessment Oregon Department of Environmental Quality Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Second Nature Climate Council Greenhouse Gas Protocol Sustainable Purchasing Leadership Council Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-04:49]: Stephania's Educational Background and Professional Pathway To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.

35mins

30 Sep 2019

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