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Kenneth Geers

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Latest 9 Oct 2021 | Updated Daily

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Эпизод 54(2) - Interview with Kenneth Geers

Securit13 Podcast

Alice, Victor Zhora and Kostiantyn Korsun talked with Kenneth Geers about his book Cyber war in perspective (pdf) https://goo.gl/RjPuqU, how can Ukraine to be a leader in cyber security, conflicts in Ukraine and Syria with perspective on cyber space and other questions. Kennet's twitter is @KennethGeers Intro / Outro Grapes - I dunno http://dig.ccmixter.org/files/grapes/16626 Видео-запись интервью на нашем канале https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCGYHYOm_J3zpyE5jCNzAHJg

1hr 24mins

18 Feb 2016

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Kenneth Geers: Hacking in a Foreign Language: A Network Security Guide to Russia (and Beyond) (English)

Black Hat Briefings, Japan 2005 [Audio] Presentations from the security conference

"Has your network ever been hacked, and all you have to show for your investigative efforts is an IP address belonging to an ISP in Irkutsk? Are you tired of receiving e-mails from Citibank that resolve to Muscovite IP addresses? Would you like to hack the Kremlin? Or do you think that the Kremlin has probably owned you first? Maybe you just think that Anna Kournikova is hot. If the answer to any of the above questions is yes, then you need an introduction to the Gulag Archipelago of the Internet, the Cyberia of interconnected networks, Russia.Do not let the persistent challenges of crossing international boundaries intimidate you any longer. In this briefing, we will follow several real-world scenarios back to Russia, and you will learn valuable strategies for taking your investigations and operations one big geographical step further. A brief introduction to Russia will be followed by 1,000 traceroutes over the frozen tundra described in detail, along with an explanation of the relationship between cyber and terrestrial geography. Information will be provided on Russian hacker groups and law enforcement personnel, as well as a personal interview with the top Russian cyber cop, conducted in Russian and translated for this briefing.Quick: name one significant advantage that Russian hackers have over you. They can read your language, but you cannot read theirs! Since most Westerners cannot read Russian, the secrets of Russian hacking are largely unknown to Westerners. You will receive a short primer on the Russian language, to include network security terminology, software translation tools, and cross-cultural social engineering faux-pas (this method will apply to cracking other foreign languages as well).Hacking in a Foreign Language details a four-step plan for crossing international frontiers in cyberspace. First, you must learn something about the Tribe: in this case, the chess players and the cosmonauts. Second, you must study their cyber Terrain. We will examine the open source information and then try to create our own network map using traceroutes. Third, we will look at the Techniques that the adversary employs. And fourth, we will conquer Translation. The goal is to level the playing field for those who do not speak a foreign language. This briefing paves the way for amateur and professional hackers to move beyond their lonely linguistic and cultural orbit in order to do battle on far-away Internet terrain.Kenneth Geers (CISSP, M.A. University of Washington, 1997) has worked for many years as a programmer, Web developer, translator, and analyst. The oddest job he had was working on the John F. Kennedy Assassination Review Board (don't ask). He also waited tables in Luxembourg , harvested grapes in the Middle East, climbed Mount Kilimanjaro, was bitten by a deadly spider in Zanzibar and made Trappist beer at 3 AM in the Rochefort monastery. Mr. Geers is the author of "Cyber Jihad: Computer Networks as a Battle Ground in the Middle East"; "Hacking in a Foreign Language: A Network Security Guide to Russia"; and "Sex, Lies, and Cyberspace: Behind Saudi Arabia's National Firewall". He loves his wife Jeanne, and daughters Isabelle, Sophie and Juliet."

1hr 27mins

31 Oct 2006

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Kenneth Geers: Hacking in a Foreign Language: A Network Security Guide to Russia (and Beyond)

Black Hat Briefings, Las Vegas 2005 [Video] Presentations from the security conference

Has your network ever been hacked, and all you have to show for your investigative efforts is an IP address belonging to an ISP in Irkutsk? Are you tired of receiving e-mails from Citibank that resolve to Muscovite IP addresses? Would you like to hack the Kremlin? Or do you think that the Kremlin has probably owned you first? Maybe you just think that Anna Kournikova is hot. If the answer to any of the above questions is yes, then you need an introduction to the Gulag Archipelago of the Internet, the Cyberia of interconnected networks, Russia. Do not let the persistent challenges of crossing international boundaries intimidate you any longer. In this briefing, we will follow several real-world scenarios back to Russia, and you will learn valuable strategies for taking your investigations and operations one big geographical step further. A brief introduction to Russia will be followed by 1,000 traceroutes over the frozen tundra described in detail, along with an explanation of the relationship between cyber and terrestrial geography. Information will be provided on Russian hacker groups and law enforcement personnel, as well as a personal interview with the top Russian cyber cop, conducted in Russian and translated for this briefing. Quick: name one significant advantage that Russian hackers have over you. They can read your language, but you cannot read theirs! Since most Westerners cannot read Russian, the secrets of Russian hacking are largely unknown to Westerners. You will receive a short primer on the Russian language, to include network security terminology, software translation tools, and cross-cultural social engineering faux-pas (this method will apply to cracking other foreign languages as well). Hacking in a Foreign Language details a four-step plan for crossing international frontiers in cyberspace. First, you must learn something about the Tribe: in this case, the chess players and the cosmonauts. Second, you must study their cyber Terrain. We will examine the open source information and then try to create our own network map using traceroutes. Third, we will look at the Techniques that the adversary employs. And fourth, we will conquer Translation. The goal is to level the playing field for those who do not speak a foreign language. This briefing paves the way for amateur and professional hackers to move beyond their lonely linguistic and cultural orbit in order to do battle on far-away Internet terrain. Kenneth Geers (M.A., University of Washington, 1997) is an accomplished computer security expert and Russian linguist. His career includes many years working as a translator, programmer, website developer and analyst. The oddest job he has had was working on the John F. Kennedy Assassination Review Board (don't ask). He also waited tables in Luxembourg, harvested flowers in the Middle East, climbed Mount Kilimanjaro, was bitten by a deadly bug in Zanzibar and made Trappist beer at 3 AM in the Rochefort monastery. He loves to read computer logfiles. In his free time, he plays chess and serves as a SANS mentor. He loves Russia, his wife Jeanne, and daughters Isabelle and Sophie. Kenneth drinks beer and feeds the empty cans to camels.

1hr 1min

4 Jun 2006

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Kenneth Geers: Hacking in a Foreign Language: A Network Security Guide to Russia (and Beyond)

Black Hat Briefings, Las Vegas 2005 [Audio] Presentations from the security conference

Has your network ever been hacked, and all you have to show for your investigative efforts is an IP address belonging to an ISP in Irkutsk? Are you tired of receiving e-mails from Citibank that resolve to Muscovite IP addresses? Would you like to hack the Kremlin? Or do you think that the Kremlin has probably owned you first? Maybe you just think that Anna Kournikova is hot. If the answer to any of the above questions is yes, then you need an introduction to the Gulag Archipelago of the Internet, the Cyberia of interconnected networks, Russia. Do not let the persistent challenges of crossing international boundaries intimidate you any longer. In this briefing, we will follow several real-world scenarios back to Russia, and you will learn valuable strategies for taking your investigations and operations one big geographical step further. A brief introduction to Russia will be followed by 1,000 traceroutes over the frozen tundra described in detail, along with an explanation of the relationship between cyber and terrestrial geography. Information will be provided on Russian hacker groups and law enforcement personnel, as well as a personal interview with the top Russian cyber cop, conducted in Russian and translated for this briefing. Quick: name one significant advantage that Russian hackers have over you. They can read your language, but you cannot read theirs! Since most Westerners cannot read Russian, the secrets of Russian hacking are largely unknown to Westerners. You will receive a short primer on the Russian language, to include network security terminology, software translation tools, and cross-cultural social engineering faux-pas (this method will apply to cracking other foreign languages as well). Hacking in a Foreign Language details a four-step plan for crossing international frontiers in cyberspace. First, you must learn something about the Tribe: in this case, the chess players and the cosmonauts. Second, you must study their cyber Terrain. We will examine the open source information and then try to create our own network map using traceroutes. Third, we will look at the Techniques that the adversary employs. And fourth, we will conquer Translation. The goal is to level the playing field for those who do not speak a foreign language. This briefing paves the way for amateur and professional hackers to move beyond their lonely linguistic and cultural orbit in order to do battle on far-away Internet terrain. Kenneth Geers (M.A., University of Washington, 1997) is an accomplished computer security expert and Russian linguist. His career includes many years working as a translator, programmer, website developer and analyst. The oddest job he has had was working on the John F. Kennedy Assassination Review Board (don't ask). He also waited tables in Luxembourg, harvested flowers in the Middle East, climbed Mount Kilimanjaro, was bitten by a deadly bug in Zanzibar and made Trappist beer at 3 AM in the Rochefort monastery. He loves to read computer logfiles. In his free time, he plays chess and serves as a SANS mentor. He loves Russia, his wife Jeanne, and daughters Isabelle and Sophie. Kenneth drinks beer and feeds the empty cans to camels.

1hr 1min

4 Jun 2006

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Kenneth Geers & Alexander Eisen: IPv6 World Update:Strategy & Tactics (Japanese)

Black Hat Briefings, Japan 2006 [Audio] Presentations from the security conference

"The U.S. Government has mandated that its organizations be IPv6-compliant by June 30, 2008. The Japanese government has already missed more than one IPv6 deadline. But while we can argue about specific dates for compliance and deployment, there is no question but that your organization must begin to prepare for the next generation Internet, and it should start today. This presentation is based on wide-ranging, in-depth research, including interviews with the top thinkers on the most crucial issues surrounding the sleeping giant known as IPv6. It will give you the facts you need in order to plan for what may be difficult times ahead. The tactical, down-in-the-weeds take on IPv6 will be examined in detail. This presentation will provide the Black Hat Japan audience with a myriad of technical details to inform them of the challenges that await their organizations as they attempt to keep pace not only with their government mandates, but also with economic competitors from around the world. The Black Hat audience will also learn how hackers will exploit this new technology, and how to stop black hats from taking advantage of the necessarily long-lasting, heterogeneous environment that will be required during the transition to IPv6. Believe it or not, many nation-states view IPv6 as crucial to their national security plans for the future. This presentation will make stops at the White House, Tokyo, Beijing, and Red Square, and cover in detail the most current v6 research and deployment events in East Asia. It will discuss how, if some governments get their way, most members of the Black Hat audience could well lose their last byte of anonymity on the Internet. The corporate side of Internet addressing will also be addressed: what do the Xbox, IPTV, and the number of beers I have left in my fridge at home have in common? Answer: IPv6!"

1hr 26mins

4 Jun 2006

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Kenneth Geers: Greetz from Room 101

Black Hat Briefings, USA 2007 [Video] Presentations from the security conference.

Imagine you are king for a day. Enemies are all around you, and they seem to be using the Internet to plot against you. Using real-world cyber war stories from the most tightly controlled nations on Earth, Greetz from Room 101 puts you in the shoes of a king who must defend the royal palace against cyber-equipped revolutionaries. Can a monarch buy cyber security? Are his trusty henchmen smart enough to learn network protocol analysis? Could a cyber attack lead to a real-life government overthrow? Ten case studies reveal the answers. Which countries have the Top Ten most Orwellian computer networks? Come to the talk and find out. Now imagine that your name is Winston Smith, and that you live in a place called 1984. You don't trust the government, and you don't trust the evening news. You can't send your girlfriend an email because you think that the Thought Police will get it first. Greetz from Room 101 details what Web surfing, email, blogging, and connections to the outside world are like for the half of our planet's population who enjoy little to no freedom online, in places where network security battles can mean life or death. Last but not least, the Black Hat audience will hear about the future of cyber control, and the future of cyber resistance.

1hr 5mins

9 Jan 2006

Episode artwork

Kenneth Geers: Greetz from Room 101

Black Hat Briefings, USA 2007 [Audio] Presentations from the security conference.

Imagine you are king for a day. Enemies are all around you, and they seem to be using the Internet to plot against you. Using real-world cyber war stories from the most tightly controlled nations on Earth, Greetz from Room 101 puts you in the shoes of a king who must defend the royal palace against cyber-equipped revolutionaries. Can a monarch buy cyber security? Are his trusty henchmen smart enough to learn network protocol analysis? Could a cyber attack lead to a real-life government overthrow? Ten case studies reveal the answers. Which countries have the Top Ten most Orwellian computer networks? Come to the talk and find out. Now imagine that your name is Winston Smith, and that you live in a place called 1984. You don't trust the government, and you don't trust the evening news. You can't send your girlfriend an email because you think that the Thought Police will get it first. Greetz from Room 101 details what Web surfing, email, blogging, and connections to the outside world are like for the half of our planet's population who enjoy little to no freedom online, in places where network security battles can mean life or death. Last but not least, the Black Hat audience will hear about the future of cyber control, and the future of cyber resistance.

1hr 5mins

9 Jan 2006