OwlTail

Cover image of Heather Davis

Heather Davis

30 Podcast Episodes

Latest 24 Sep 2022 | Updated Daily

Episode artwork

Heather Davis, "Plastic Matter" (Duke UP, 2022)

New Books in Science, Technology, and Society

Plastic is ubiquitous. It is in the Arctic, in the depths of the Mariana Trench, and in the high mountaintops of the Pyrenees. It is in the air we breathe and the water we drink. Nanoplastics penetrate our cell walls. Plastic is not just any material—it is emblematic of life in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. In Plastic Matter (Duke UP, 2022), Heather Davis traces plastic’s relations to geology, media, biology, and race to show how matter itself has come to be understood as pliable, disposable, and consumable. The invention and widespread use of plastic, Davis contends, reveals the dominance of the Western orientation to matter and its assumption that matter exists to be endlessly manipulated and controlled by humans. Plastic’s materiality and pliability reinforces these expectations of what matter should be and do. Davis charts these relations to matter by mapping the queer multispecies relationships between humans and plastic-eating bacteria and analyzing photography that documents the racialized environmental violence of plastic production. In so doing, Davis provokes readers to reexamine their relationships to matter and life in light of plastic’s saturation.Adam Bobeck is a PhD candidate in Cultural Anthropology at the University of Leipzig. His PhD is entitled “Object-Oriented Azadari: Shi’i Muslim Rituals and Ontology”. For more about his work, see www.adambobeck.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/science-technology-and-society

1hr 2mins

31 May 2022

Episode artwork

Heather Davis, "Plastic Matter" (Duke UP, 2022)

New Books Network

Plastic is ubiquitous. It is in the Arctic, in the depths of the Mariana Trench, and in the high mountaintops of the Pyrenees. It is in the air we breathe and the water we drink. Nanoplastics penetrate our cell walls. Plastic is not just any material—it is emblematic of life in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. In Plastic Matter (Duke UP, 2022), Heather Davis traces plastic’s relations to geology, media, biology, and race to show how matter itself has come to be understood as pliable, disposable, and consumable. The invention and widespread use of plastic, Davis contends, reveals the dominance of the Western orientation to matter and its assumption that matter exists to be endlessly manipulated and controlled by humans. Plastic’s materiality and pliability reinforces these expectations of what matter should be and do. Davis charts these relations to matter by mapping the queer multispecies relationships between humans and plastic-eating bacteria and analyzing photography that documents the racialized environmental violence of plastic production. In so doing, Davis provokes readers to reexamine their relationships to matter and life in light of plastic’s saturation.Adam Bobeck is a PhD candidate in Cultural Anthropology at the University of Leipzig. His PhD is entitled “Object-Oriented Azadari: Shi’i Muslim Rituals and Ontology”. For more about his work, see www.adambobeck.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

1hr 2mins

31 May 2022

Similar People

Episode artwork

Heather Davis, "Plastic Matter" (Duke UP, 2022)

New Books in Geography

Plastic is ubiquitous. It is in the Arctic, in the depths of the Mariana Trench, and in the high mountaintops of the Pyrenees. It is in the air we breathe and the water we drink. Nanoplastics penetrate our cell walls. Plastic is not just any material—it is emblematic of life in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. In Plastic Matter (Duke UP, 2022), Heather Davis traces plastic’s relations to geology, media, biology, and race to show how matter itself has come to be understood as pliable, disposable, and consumable. The invention and widespread use of plastic, Davis contends, reveals the dominance of the Western orientation to matter and its assumption that matter exists to be endlessly manipulated and controlled by humans. Plastic’s materiality and pliability reinforces these expectations of what matter should be and do. Davis charts these relations to matter by mapping the queer multispecies relationships between humans and plastic-eating bacteria and analyzing photography that documents the racialized environmental violence of plastic production. In so doing, Davis provokes readers to reexamine their relationships to matter and life in light of plastic’s saturation.Adam Bobeck is a PhD candidate in Cultural Anthropology at the University of Leipzig. His PhD is entitled “Object-Oriented Azadari: Shi’i Muslim Rituals and Ontology”. For more about his work, see www.adambobeck.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/geography

1hr 2mins

31 May 2022

Episode artwork

Heather Davis, "Plastic Matter" (Duke UP, 2022)

New Books in Critical Theory

Plastic is ubiquitous. It is in the Arctic, in the depths of the Mariana Trench, and in the high mountaintops of the Pyrenees. It is in the air we breathe and the water we drink. Nanoplastics penetrate our cell walls. Plastic is not just any material—it is emblematic of life in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. In Plastic Matter (Duke UP, 2022), Heather Davis traces plastic’s relations to geology, media, biology, and race to show how matter itself has come to be understood as pliable, disposable, and consumable. The invention and widespread use of plastic, Davis contends, reveals the dominance of the Western orientation to matter and its assumption that matter exists to be endlessly manipulated and controlled by humans. Plastic’s materiality and pliability reinforces these expectations of what matter should be and do. Davis charts these relations to matter by mapping the queer multispecies relationships between humans and plastic-eating bacteria and analyzing photography that documents the racialized environmental violence of plastic production. In so doing, Davis provokes readers to reexamine their relationships to matter and life in light of plastic’s saturation.Adam Bobeck is a PhD candidate in Cultural Anthropology at the University of Leipzig. His PhD is entitled “Object-Oriented Azadari: Shi’i Muslim Rituals and Ontology”. For more about his work, see www.adambobeck.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/critical-theory

1hr 2mins

31 May 2022

Most Popular

Episode artwork

Heather Davis, "Plastic Matter" (Duke UP, 2022)

New Books in Biology and Evolution

Plastic is ubiquitous. It is in the Arctic, in the depths of the Mariana Trench, and in the high mountaintops of the Pyrenees. It is in the air we breathe and the water we drink. Nanoplastics penetrate our cell walls. Plastic is not just any material—it is emblematic of life in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. In Plastic Matter (Duke UP, 2022), Heather Davis traces plastic’s relations to geology, media, biology, and race to show how matter itself has come to be understood as pliable, disposable, and consumable. The invention and widespread use of plastic, Davis contends, reveals the dominance of the Western orientation to matter and its assumption that matter exists to be endlessly manipulated and controlled by humans. Plastic’s materiality and pliability reinforces these expectations of what matter should be and do. Davis charts these relations to matter by mapping the queer multispecies relationships between humans and plastic-eating bacteria and analyzing photography that documents the racialized environmental violence of plastic production. In so doing, Davis provokes readers to reexamine their relationships to matter and life in light of plastic’s saturation.Adam Bobeck is a PhD candidate in Cultural Anthropology at the University of Leipzig. His PhD is entitled “Object-Oriented Azadari: Shi’i Muslim Rituals and Ontology”. For more about his work, see www.adambobeck.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

1hr 2mins

31 May 2022

Episode artwork

Heather Davis, "Plastic Matter" (Duke UP, 2022)

New Books in LGBTQ+ Studies

Plastic is ubiquitous. It is in the Arctic, in the depths of the Mariana Trench, and in the high mountaintops of the Pyrenees. It is in the air we breathe and the water we drink. Nanoplastics penetrate our cell walls. Plastic is not just any material—it is emblematic of life in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. In Plastic Matter (Duke UP, 2022), Heather Davis traces plastic’s relations to geology, media, biology, and race to show how matter itself has come to be understood as pliable, disposable, and consumable. The invention and widespread use of plastic, Davis contends, reveals the dominance of the Western orientation to matter and its assumption that matter exists to be endlessly manipulated and controlled by humans. Plastic’s materiality and pliability reinforces these expectations of what matter should be and do. Davis charts these relations to matter by mapping the queer multispecies relationships between humans and plastic-eating bacteria and analyzing photography that documents the racialized environmental violence of plastic production. In so doing, Davis provokes readers to reexamine their relationships to matter and life in light of plastic’s saturation.Adam Bobeck is a PhD candidate in Cultural Anthropology at the University of Leipzig. His PhD is entitled “Object-Oriented Azadari: Shi’i Muslim Rituals and Ontology”. For more about his work, see www.adambobeck.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/lgbtq-studies

1hr 2mins

31 May 2022

Episode artwork

Heather Davis, "Plastic Matter" (Duke UP, 2022)

New Books in Environmental Studies

Plastic is ubiquitous. It is in the Arctic, in the depths of the Mariana Trench, and in the high mountaintops of the Pyrenees. It is in the air we breathe and the water we drink. Nanoplastics penetrate our cell walls. Plastic is not just any material—it is emblematic of life in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. In Plastic Matter (Duke UP, 2022), Heather Davis traces plastic’s relations to geology, media, biology, and race to show how matter itself has come to be understood as pliable, disposable, and consumable. The invention and widespread use of plastic, Davis contends, reveals the dominance of the Western orientation to matter and its assumption that matter exists to be endlessly manipulated and controlled by humans. Plastic’s materiality and pliability reinforces these expectations of what matter should be and do. Davis charts these relations to matter by mapping the queer multispecies relationships between humans and plastic-eating bacteria and analyzing photography that documents the racialized environmental violence of plastic production. In so doing, Davis provokes readers to reexamine their relationships to matter and life in light of plastic’s saturation.Adam Bobeck is a PhD candidate in Cultural Anthropology at the University of Leipzig. His PhD is entitled “Object-Oriented Azadari: Shi’i Muslim Rituals and Ontology”. For more about his work, see www.adambobeck.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/environmental-studies

1hr 2mins

31 May 2022

Episode artwork

Ep. 206: Experts Discuss - Will Hybrid Work Ruin the Workplace? with Charlotte Myland, Heather Davis, and Natalie Richardson of Slalom

Workplace Innovator Podcast | Enhancing Your Employee Experience | Facility Management | CRE | Digital Workplace Technology

Charlotte Myland is Global Senior Director of Organizational Effectiveness, Natalie Richardson, M.ED. is Lead of the HabLab Future of Work Laboratory and Heather Davis, PHR, SHRM-CP, CDE is Senior Organizational Effectiveness Consultant at Slalom, a global consulting firm that focuses on strategy, technology, and business transformation. In April 2022, Mike Petrusky hosted a live webinar called “Experts Discuss - Will Hybrid Work Ruin the Workplace?” where his guests shared their vision of the future of work based on Slalom’s Future of Work report, HabLab experiments, and what they’re seeing from clients. The panel explored why a human-centered philosophy is an imperative for the future of work, how to experiment with the habits and habitats of your organization and what ways you can “build better tomorrows for all” to support people and places. Check out these audio highlights and then download the full hour-long video with audience Q&A! Connect with Natalie on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/natalierichardson10/ Connect with Charlotte on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/charlottemyland/ Connect with Heather on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/heatheredavis/ Learn more about Slalom: https://www.slalom.com/ Watch the full one-hour video recording with Q&A: https://www.iofficecorp.com/experts-discuss-will-hybrid-work-ruin-the-workplace Discover free resources and explore past interviews at: https://www.workplaceinnovator.com/ Connect with Mike on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mikepetrusky/ Share your thoughts with Mike via email: podcast@iOFFICECORP.com

24mins

3 May 2022

Episode artwork

Find Your Happy Triggers with Author Heather Davis

Moms Who Create

Today I’m talking to the author Heather Davis. Heather is a mother of 8 children, including 6 children adopted through the foster system. She learned the value of teaching her children through stories, and she now writes stories for a new generation. Her books really are incredible. They allow all children to feel seen, included and confident in who they are. I know by the end of our chat, you’re going to have a huge smile on your face. Enjoy today’s episode.Heather Davishttps://heathershelpfulstories.com/https://instagram.com/heathershelpfulstorieshttps://facebook.com/icansleepwhenthewindblowsInstacart - Groceries delivered in as little as 1 hour. Free delivery on your first order over $35.Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you.Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/Momswhocreate)

37mins

11 Apr 2022

Episode artwork

#83: Get Unstuck: Shame with Heather Davis Nelson

Grace In Real Life podcast

What’s the #1 way to get unstuck from shame? How are shame, conviction, and guilt different? And what are the two main default responses to shame, and how do you get unstuck? Today we are talking about shame, and y’all shame is a place so many of us have stayed stuck.  We can feel shame about anything and everything. We can feel shame about: The choices in our past like having an abortion, committing adultery, or having sex before marriage, what our body looks like (or doesn’t), our parenting: what we allow, what we don’t, what rules we enforce, how much sugar is consumed, and how much screen-time we allow, and about 1,000,001 other things like our housekeeping or how many unanswered emails are glaring at us from our in-box or that we haven’t had a quiet time in a week; we feel like all these “lapses” point to how we don’t have it all together in a world that demands that we do. But what does God say about shame? Grace says shame is not yours to carry. Grace says Jesus nailed your sins to the cross and you bear them no more. Grace says God doesn’t need an unblemished canvas to create a masterpiece. Grace says shame doesn’t exist in the light of God’s complete, overwhelming, and eternal presence. In this episode, Heather: reminds us that God’s words are words of love and we can trust the Spirit to convict us; we don’t need to go looking for shame. offers one next step you can take when you feel stuck in the shame of your past, and shares freedom to all of us mamas who feel shame about every choice we make.   Key Quotes “Shame is pervasive to identity and becomes interconnected with how you view yourself.” - Author Heather Davis Nelson “Shames loves darkness and isolation. Anytime we begin to talk about it, its power begins to go away.” - Author Heather Davis Nelson “Setting the lies of shame against the truth of scripture begins to change our hearts and minds.” - Author Heather Davis Nelson “We’re doing the best we can, and tomorrow is a new day.” - Author Heather Davis Nelson “So what does it look like to start off tomorrow thinking, ‘I’ve got new mercies today?’” - Author Heather Davis Nelson “It’s about tuning out the crowd and cacophony of noises and tuning into the Spirit’s voice.” - Author Heather Davis Nelson “God’s words are words of love, and if there are specific things, He’ll convict me of that. I don’t have to live out of this vague sense of ‘not good enough.’” - Author Heather Davis Nelson “You can’t be afraid of making mistakes when you come to the canvas.” - Author Heather Davis Nelson “The shame you’re dealing with is not from God. The way to fight it is to shine light.” - Author Heather Davis Nelson Mentioned in the Podcast The FCC requires that I tell you that I'm an Amazon Affiliate, which means I earn a bit of commission on each sale. But don't worry there's no added cost to you! Episode #81: Get Unstuck: Your identity in Christ with Jen Babakhan Episode #82: Get Unstuck: Your thought life with Lauren Gaines Bible Study Fellowship Association of Biblical Counselors American Association of Christian Counselors Global Counseling Network Unashamed: Healing Our Brokenness and Finding Freedom from Shame by Heather Davis Nelson Grace says shame is not yours to carry How Comparison Leads to Shame, Fear, and a Faulty View of God How do I know if I’m doing enough? (And other questions I’m asking myself) What God says about your messy past How to stop beating yourself up after you make a mistake About Heather Davis Nelson Heather (Davis) Nelson grew up in Greenville, South Carolina, where she returned in 2017 with her husband, Seth, who's a dean at Erskine Seminary, and her twin daughters who are in 5th grade.  She ventured to the Chicagoland area for undergraduate studies in education at Wheaton College, and then to Philadelphia for graduate school at Westminster Theology Seminary, where she earned her M.A. in Biblical Counseling in 2007.  For more than a decade, Heather has counseled women, couples, and families through a variety of life’s struggles, including depression, anxiety, recovery from abuse, marital and family conflict, cross-cultural missions debriefing, and identity + calling.  Heather is also the author of Unashamed: Healing Our Brokenness and Finding Freedom from Shame  and Domestic Abuse: Help For Victims  She enjoys family bike rides on the Swamp Rabbit Trail, coffee, reading, writing, and exploring the revitalized downtown of Greenville.    Here’s how to connect with Heather Twitter Facebook Website Here’s how to connect with Jill Website GraceInRealLifePodcast.com  Instagram Facebook group Facebook page Subscribe to Jill’s weekly “the good + the grace” email 

50mins

21 Sep 2021

Loading