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David Baltimore

7 Podcast Episodes

Latest 28 Aug 2021 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

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101 | David Baltimore on the Mysteries of Viruses

Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

I recently saw an estimate that if you took all the novel coronaviruses in the world (the actual viruses, not patients), you could fit them into a bucket no more than a couple of liters in volume. A huge impact has been wrought by a very small amount of stuff. The world of viruses is vast and complicated, and we’re still learning some of its basic features. Today’s guest David Baltimore won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for the discovery that genetic information in viruses could flow from RNA to DNA, establishing an exception to the Central Dogma of Biology. He is the author of the Baltimore Classification scheme for viruses, and has done important research in the role of viruses in diseases from AIDS to cancer. We talk about what viruses are, how they work, and the status of the novel coronavirus we are currently battling. David also has some strong opinions about public health and how we should be preparing for future outbreaks.Support Mindscape on Patreon.David Baltimore received his Ph.D. in molecular biology from the Rockefeller Institute. He is currently the Robert Andrews Millikan Professor of Biology at Caltech. At age 37 he was awarded the Nobel Prize, which he shared with Howard Temin and Renato Dulbecco. He has served as the President of both Rockefeller University and Caltech, as well as President of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Founding Director of the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research. Among his other awards are the National Medal of Science and the Warren Alpert Foundation Prize.Caltech Web PageNobel Prize pageWikipediaAhead of the Curve: David Baltimore’s Life in Science, by Shane Crotty“Introduction to Viruses” videoSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

1hr 14mins

15 Jun 2020

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Ep. 5: Breaking the Code, with Nobel Laureate David Baltimore

Conversations with Mike Milken

In this episode, Mike speaks with David Baltimore, a Nobel laureate, member of the FasterCures board, In this episode, Mike speaks with David Baltimore, a Nobel laureate, member of the FasterCures board, and the current president emeritus; Robert Andrews Millikan professor of biology at the California Institute of Technology.Based on his extensive research into genetics and virology, Baltimore describes the different challenges posed by COVID-19, and how it compares to the progress made on previous public health crises, including HIV, polio, and influenza. While the future is uncertain, he takes comfort in knowing there has never been a larger international effort to fight an infection: “that, alone, makes me optimistic.”

13mins

7 Apr 2020

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David Baltimore (Caltech): Introduction to Viruses and Discovering Reverse Transcriptase (with English subtitles)

iBiology: Subtitled versions

David Baltimore outlines the sequence of events that led to the Nobel Prize-winning discovery of reverse transcriptase, an enzyme that converts a sequence in an RNA molecule into a sequence in a DNA molecule.https://www.ibiology.org/human-disease/reverse-transcriptase/Dr. David Baltimore introduces the different types of viruses, and defines how viruses are classified depending on their genetic material. Using HIV as an example, Baltimore explains what constitutes an equilibrium versus a non-equilibrium virus, and shows how the discovery of the reverse transcriptase helped scientist understand viruses.Baltimore also outlines the sequence of events that led to the Nobel Prize-winning discovery of reverse transcriptase, an enzyme that converts a sequence in an RNA molecule into a sequence in a DNA molecule. As Baltimore explains, the discovery of reverse transcriptase has revolutionized modern molecular biology, and it has aided in the understanding of viruses like HIV, and the genetic basis of cancer.     Speaker Biography: After serving as President of the California Institute of Technology for nine years, in 2006 David Baltimore was appointed President Emeritus and the Robert Andrews Millikan Professor of Biology. Born in New York City, he received his B.A. in Chemistry from Swarthmore College in 1960 and a Ph.D. in 1964 from Rockefeller University, where he returned to serve as President from 1990-91 and faculty member until 1994. For almost 30 years, Baltimore was a faculty member at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. While his early work was on poliovirus, in 1970 he identified the enzyme reverse transcriptase in tumor virus particles, thus providing strong evidence for a process of RNA to DNA conversion, the existence of which had been hypothesized some years earlier. Baltimore and Howard Temin (with Renato Dulbecco, for related research) shared the 1975 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their discovery, which provided the key to understanding the life-cycle of HIV. In the following years, he has contributed widely to the understanding of cancer, AIDS and the molecular basis of the immune response. In addition to receiving the Nobel Prize, Baltimore's numerous honors include the 1999 National Medal of Science, election to the National Academy of Sciences in 1974, the Royal Society of London, and the French Academy of Sciences. Learn more about Baltimore’s research at his lab website: http://www.bbe.caltech.edu/content/david-baltimore

29mins

21 Dec 2018

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David Baltimore (CalTech): microRNAs Create Regulatory Tension in Mammalian Blood Cells (with English subtitles)

iBiology: Subtitled versions

What is the involvement of microRNAs in the inflammatory response? In this seminar, David Baltimore shows how miRNAs are involved in the precise tuning of the inflammatory response.https://www.ibiology.org/immunology/micrornas-and-inflammatory-responseTalk Overview:What is the involvement of microRNAs in the inflammatory response? In this seminar, Dr. David Baltimore shows that the expression of three microRNAs (miR-132, miR-146, and miR-155) increase upon activation of the inflammatory pathway. Baltimore characterizes these microRNAs and shows how they are involved in the precise tuning of the inflammatory response.Speaker Biography: After serving as President of the California Institute of Technology for nine years, in 2006 David Baltimore was appointed President Emeritus and the Robert Andrews Millikan Professor of Biology. Born in New York City, he received his B.A. in Chemistry from Swarthmore College in 1960 and a Ph.D. in 1964 from Rockefeller University, where he returned to serve as President from 1990-91 and faculty member until 1994. For almost 30 years, Baltimore was a faculty member at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. While his early work was on poliovirus, in 1970 he identified the enzyme reverse transcriptase in tumor virus particles, thus providing strong evidence for a process of RNA to DNA conversion, the existence of which had been hypothesized some years earlier. Baltimore and Howard Temin (with Renato Dulbecco, for related research) shared the 1975 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their discovery, which provided the key to understanding the life-cycle of HIV. In the following years, he has contributed widely to the understanding of cancer, AIDS and the molecular basis of the immune response. In addition to receiving the Nobel Prize, Baltimore's numerous honors include the 1999 National Medal of Science, election to the National Academy of Sciences in 1974, the Royal Society of London, and the French Academy of Sciences. Learn more about Baltimore’s research at his lab website: http://www.bbe.caltech.edu/content/david-baltimore

27mins

20 Dec 2018

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Dr. David Baltimore

The Inner Scientist

In this episode Dr. David Baltimore discusses the discovery of the first reverse transcriptase in 1970, which led to his Nobel Prize in Physiology in 1975. He also talks about transitioning his lab's research on animal viruses to cancer biology and immunology, with major discoveries in each area. Important career guidance to young researchers is also provided.

1hr 51mins

13 Aug 2018

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David Baltimore - Winner of the 2017 Sir Michael Stoker Award (Series 1 Episode 8)

CVR podcast Contagious Thinking

In the last episode of our current series Jack, Yasmin and Andrew are joined by renowned virologist and Nobel laureate Professor David Baltimore, the 2017 winner of the CVR's Sir Michael Stoker Award, to discuss his career. David and his lab have been involved in key developments in virology such as discovering reverse transcriptase (and therefore retroviruses) and making the first infectious clone of an RNA virus.If you like this podcast check out some of our previous content about viruses including HIV over at cvrblogs.myportfolio.com.Music: The Zeppelin by Blue Dot Sessions (freemusicarchive.org/music/Blue_Dot…_Zeppelin_1908)

21mins

26 Jul 2018

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First Rounder: David Baltimore

First Rounders

David Baltimore, president emeritus of the California Institute of Technology, discusses his parents moving him from New York City to Great Neck, Long Island, as a child; his initial interest in animal virology; and getting that Nobel call from Sweden.See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

1hr 6mins

19 Jul 2016