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Irene Tracey Podcasts

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10 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Irene Tracey. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Irene Tracey, often where they are interviewed.

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10 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Irene Tracey. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Irene Tracey, often where they are interviewed.

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This Might Hurt - Irene Tracey

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We discuss the Neuroscience of Pain perception Lukas Krone and Alex von Klemperer talk to Prof Irene Tracey of the Oxford Nuffield Clinical Neurosciences Department about her pioneering work studying chronic and acute pain through neuroimaging as well as some of her more recent projects on Aneasthetic depth. We also discuss how she approaches both being a scientist and taking on executive roles such as head of department and her life outside of science.
Jan 02 2020 · 1hr 15mins
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Irene Tracey on pain in the brain

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Pain, as we know, is highly personal. Some can cope with huge amounts, while others reel in agony over a seemingly minor injury. Though you might feel the stab of pain in your stubbed toe or sprained ankle, it is actually processed in the brain.

That is where Irene Tracey, Nuffield Professor of Anaesthetic Science at Oxford University, has been focussing her attention. Known as the Queen of Pain, she has spent the past two decades unravelling the complexities of this puzzling sensation.

She goes behind the scenes, as it were, of what happens when we feel pain - scanning the brains of her research subjects while subjecting them to a fair amount of burning, prodding and poking.

Her work is transforming our understanding, revealing how our emotions influence our experience of pain, how chronic pain develops and even when consciousness is present in the brain.

Producer: Beth Eastwood
Jul 15 2019 · 27mins
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Irene Tracey on pain in the brain

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Pain, as we know, is highly personal. Some can cope with huge amounts, while others reel in agony over a seemingly minor injury. Though you might feel the stab of pain in your stubbed toe or sprained ankle, it is actually processed in the brain.

That is where Irene Tracey, Nuffield Professor of Anaesthetic Science at Oxford University, has been focussing her attention. Known as the Queen of Pain, she has spent the past two decades unravelling the complexities of this puzzling sensation.

She goes behind the scenes, as it were, of what happens when we feel pain - scanning the brains of her research subjects while subjecting them to a fair amount of burning, prodding and poking.

Her work is transforming our understanding, revealing how our emotions influence our experience of pain, how chronic pain develops and even when consciousness is present in the brain.

Producer: Beth Eastwood
Apr 02 2019 · 28mins
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NCTalks with Irene Tracey: lessons from pain, analgesia and anesthesia

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At the FENS Forum of Neuroscience (7–11 July, Berlin, Germany), we had the pleasure of speaking with Irene Tracey, who is a Professor based at the University of Oxford (UK). Irene is also the Head of the Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences (Oxford, UK), which includes a multidisciplinary taskforce working to understand neuroscience from a basic discovery perspective all the way through to clinical problems. Irene’s research particularly focuses on using neuroimaging to understand pain.

In this NCTalks podcast recorded at the event, Lauren Pulling (Publisher) speaks to Irene to find out more about her talk at FENS, including significant breakthroughs within the field and if we could ever have one standardized measure of pain.

View more podcasts, news and exclusive interviews at www.neuro-central.com
Jul 18 2018 · 7mins
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Finding the Hurt in Pain - With Irene Tracey, Ph.D.

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In our Cerebrum article, “Finding the Hurt in Pain,” Irene Tracey, head of the Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences at the University of Oxford, writes that pain is unique to every person, and difficult to quantify and treat. Whether it is delivered as a jolt or a persistent, dull ache, pain is guaranteed to affect one’s quality of life. Our podcast examines how brain imaging is opening our eyes to the richness and complexity of the pain experience, giving us extraordinary insight into the neurochemistry, network activity, wiring, and structures relevant to producing and modulating painful experiences in all their various guises. Tracey also discusses how imaging pain is having an increasing impact in the judiciary and in resolving end-of-life issues.

Feb 13 2017 · 41mins
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Irene Tracey: Women in Science

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Irene Tracey is the co-founder and director of the Oxford Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain (FMRIB) Irene Tracey gives a passionate insight into her career and how she balances work and life. As she puts it 'A scientific career is not an easy one to choose: it’s tough and competitive'.
Dec 10 2014 · 32mins
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Irene Tracey: Women in Science

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Irene Tracey is the co-founder and director of the Oxford Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain (FMRIB) Irene Tracey gives a passionate insight into her career and how she balances work and life. As she puts it 'A scientific career is not an easy one to choose: it’s tough and competitive'.
Dec 10 2014 · 32mins
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Irene Tracey: Women in Science

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Irene Tracey gives a passionate insight into her career and how she balances work and life. As she puts it 'A scientific career is not an easy one to choose: it’s tough and competitive'. Irene Tracey is the co-founder and director of the Oxford Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain (FMRIB).
Apr 08 2014 · 32mins
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Irene Tracey on FMRI and Pain

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Professor Irene Tracey, director of the Oxford Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain, explains how MRI works and then talks about her research into people's perception of pain.
Sep 12 2008 · 44mins
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Irene Tracey on FMRI and Pain

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Professor Irene Tracey, director of the Oxford Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain, explains how MRI works and then talks about her research into people’s perception of pain.
Sep 12 2008 · 44mins