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Branko Milanovic

27 Podcast Episodes

Latest 24 Sep 2022 | Updated Daily

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Discussion | Branko Milanovic – Left vs. Right Views on Neoliberalism

konflikt Podcast

Economist Branko Milanovic is a leading expert on global income distribution. Erik talked to him to discuss economic transformations, border policy, and left- vs right-wing approaches to global inequality. konflikt + abonnieren: https://konfliktmag.de/mitgliedschaften/konflikt-plus/ konflikt unterstützen: https://konfliktmag.de/unterstuetzen/ Postliberal kaufen: https://antaios.de/gesamtverzeichnis-antaios/reihe-kaplaken/124066/postliberal +++++++++++++ konflikt Magazin Telegram: t.me/konfliktmagazin +++++++++++++ Website: konfliktmag.de E-Mail: redaktion@konfliktmag.de +++++++++++++ Twitter: twitter.com/konfliktmag Facebook: www.facebook.com/konfliktmag +++++++++++++ DLive: dlive.tv/konfliktmag Podcast: konfliktmagazin.podbean.com +++++++++++++ Image: Niccolò Caranti (CC BY-SA 4.0), has been edited. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Branko_Milanović_-_Festival_Economia_2018.jpg

1hr 12mins

14 Apr 2022

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“AN INCREDIBLE EXPLOSION OF INEQUALITY” – with Renowned Economist, Branko Milanovic

EQUALS: Reimagining Our Economy

We are witnessing a COVID-19 driven explosion in inequality. This week, Oxfam released its annual report, Inequality Kills, showing that the pandemic is killing at least 1 person every 4 seconds, while the ten richest men have doubled their fortunes during this same pandemic. This is the biggest single increase in billionaire wealth in recorded history. Max and Nadia talk to Branko Milanovic, world-renowned authority on inequality, to find out why.Branko is a Senior Scholar at City University of New York’s Stone Center on Socio-economic Inequality and Centennial Professor at London School of Economics' International Inequalities Institute (III). He was the Lead Economist in the World Bank’s Research Department for almost 20 years, before leaving to write his book on global income inequality, Worlds Apart (2005). He has since authored three more award-winning books – The Haves and the Have-nots (2011), Global Inequality (2016) and Capitalism, Alone  (2019).Please do share the episode on your social media.If you’re joining us on EQUALS for the first time, tune in to our earlier interviews – from talking with the award-winning journalist Gary Younge on what we can learn from Martin Luther King Jr to fight inequality, to best-selling author Anand Giridharadas on whether we need billionaires, Zambian music artist PilAto on the power of music, thinker Ece Temelkuran on beating fascism, climate activist Hindou Ibrahim on nature, and the Managing Director of the International Monetary Fund Kristalina Georgieva on what comes after the pandemic. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

21mins

21 Jan 2022

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Weekends: Capitalism Alone w/ Branko Milanovic

Jacobin Radio

Economist Branko Milanovic joins Weekends to discuss the public's declining faith in capitalism, whether viable alternatives exist, how the system generates inequality, and whether social democracy can still play a role in ameliorating it. Weekends features free-flowing and humorous commentary on current events and political strategy. This is the podcast version of the show from August 20, 2021.Verso book club: https://www.versobooks.com/bookclubMusic provided by Zonkey: https://linktr.ee/zonkeyPatreon: https://www.patreon.com/jacobinmag Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

1hr 59mins

23 Aug 2021

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Branko Milanovic Capitalism, Democracy and the Future of Mankind

Room for Discussion

Branko Milanovic is one of the leading experts on income inequality and poverty. Formerly a lead economist at the research department of the World Bank, he now teaches at the City University of New York and London School of Economics, amongst others. He is perhaps most well known for publishing the ‘hottest’ chart in economics, the famous elephant curve, which describes how globalization has affected the global income distribution over the last 30 years. The basic message is that whilst between-country inequality has decreased, within-country inequality has increased. This research had a big impact on our understanding of inequality and it remains crucial to answering the pressing questions of how we can reduce inequality and what trends we can expect in the coming years.He has written multiple books on globalization and its consequences. In his most recent book ‘Capitalism, alone’, he argues that capitalism is the only mode of production existent in the world right now and explores the different types of capitalism, as well as the relationship between capitalism and democracy. What type of capitalism is most beneficial for humans? Are these two modes of capitalism at war with each other, or are they going to be? And what does this all mean for the future of democracy? These are some of the biggest questions one could ask and with Mr. Milanovic, we’ll try at the very least to get a better idea of how we could begin to answer them.

1hr 10mins

1 Aug 2021

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S1, E4 Branko Milanovic – Capitalism Alone: The Future of the System that Rules the World

Cutting Edge Issues in Development Thinking & Practice

Guest lecturer, Branko Milanovic joins us from New York to talk to us about "The Future of the System that Rules the World". The lecture is part of the LSE ID Cutting Edge Issues in Development Thinking & Practice series.

55mins

29 Jul 2021

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Branko Milanovic on COVID-19 and inequality in capitalist systems | The Hindu In Focus Podcast

In Focus by The Hindu

As the world stumbles through a second year of the COVID-19 pandemic, it is clear that both its catastrophic toll on human life and the severe socioeconomic dislocation it has caused matter equally. Yet it is also becoming clear that there is a growing inequality associated with governments and private citizens’ responses to the pandemic – whether in terms of access to vaccines or public policy measures to support the most vulnerable sections.In this context, the work of Professor Branko Milanovic of the Stone Center on Socio Economic Inequality at the City University of New York, and former lead economist in the World Bank’s Research Department for almost 20 years, matters ever more today, especially his study of the relationship between inequality and different forms of capitalism across the world. On this episode of the In Focus podcast, he shares his perspective on this subject, including on its relevance to India, with The Hindu's Associate Editor Narayan Lakshman.

24mins

17 Jun 2021

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Branko Milanovic on the Dangers of Income Inequality

Global Governance Podcast

Today, we are pleased to welcome a thinker and scholar who is a master at communicating the complex in a simple and relatable way. Branko Milanovic served as lead economist in the World Bank's research department for twenty years and has had teaching appointments at the University of Maryland, Johns Hopkins and currently is a Visiting President Professor at City University of New York. Branko and I will discuss the state of income inequality today, the impact of COVID-19, universal basic income and more.For more information about this episode and the Global Governance Forum visit GlobalGovernanceForum.org

45mins

15 Feb 2021

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Bonuspodcast: Branko Milanovic om den sejrende kapitalisme

Radio Information

Kære lytter, Da jeg voksede op i 1970’erne, var jeg helt sikker på, at de rigeste lande også var de frieste lande. At de lande, hvor man kørte i de største biler, havde adgang til den nye teknologi og kunne gå i det mest mondæne tøj, også var de lande, hvor man havde frihed til at sige det, man mente og selv kunne være med til at bestemme, hvem der skulle være landets politiske ledere. Rigdom og frihed hang sammen. Sådan tænkte Branko Milanovic også, selvom han voksede op i en helt anden del af verden på et andet tidspunkt. Han voksede op i det kommunistiske Jugoslavien i 1960’erne og tænkte, at der var rigdom og frihed i det kapitalistiske Vesten. Men måske er det ikke sådan længere: Kina bliver en større og større økonomisk stormagt samtidig med at det bliver en mere og mere autoritær stat. Det rejser en masse spørgsmål om sammenhængen mellem kapitalisme og demokrati, velstand og frihed i verden. Og heldigvis er økonomen Branko Milanovic en enestående kapacitet, som har studeret data, lavet overbevisende ulighedsundersøgelser og netop har skrevet en ny bog om en verden, hvor kapitalismen er den eneste mulige samfundsform. Og han besvarer alle mine spørgsmål på en måde, så jeg kom meget klogere fra samtalen: »Kapitalismen har vundet globalt, fordi den har skabt den indre etik hos den enkelte om, at du har ret og pligt til at realisere dit begær efter velstand. Kultur og økonomi hænger på den måde sammen. Det er jo en succes. Men det betyder også, at de samfund, som kan levere økonomiske fremskridt for deres borgere, opnår opbakning i deres befolkninger. Og det, kan vi se nu, er ikke nødvendigvis demokratiske samfund.« God fornøjelse med denne langsomme samtale med en ven af huset, Branko Milanovic. Rune Lykkeberg

45mins

7 Feb 2021

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Branko Milanovic om den sejrende kapitalisme

Langsomme samtaler med Rune Lykkeberg

Kære lytter, Da jeg voksede op i 1970’erne, var jeg helt sikker på, at de rigeste lande også var de frieste lande. At de lande, hvor man kørte i de største biler, havde adgang til den nye teknologi og kunne gå i det mest mondæne tøj, også var de lande, hvor man havde frihed til at sige det, man mente og selv kunne være med til at bestemme, hvem der skulle være landets politiske ledere. Rigdom og frihed hang sammen. Sådan tænkte Branko Milanovic også, selvom han voksede op i en helt anden del af verden på et andet tidspunkt. Han voksede op i det kommunistiske Jugoslavien i 1960’erne og tænkte, at der var rigdom og frihed i det kapitalistiske Vesten. Men måske er det ikke sådan længere: Kina bliver en større og større økonomisk stormagt samtidig med at det bliver en mere og mere autoritær stat. Det rejser en masse spørgsmål om sammenhængen mellem kapitalisme og demokrati, velstand og frihed i verden. Og heldigvis er økonomen Branko Milanovic en enestående kapacitet, som har studeret data, lavet overbevisende ulighedsundersøgelser og netop har skrevet en ny bog om en verden, hvor kapitalismen er den eneste mulige samfundsform. Og han besvarer alle mine spørgsmål på en måde, så jeg kom meget klogere fra samtalen: »Kapitalismen har vundet globalt, fordi den har skabt den indre etik hos den enkelte om, at du har ret og pligt til at realisere dit begær efter velstand. Kultur og økonomi hænger på den måde sammen. Det er jo en succes. Men det betyder også, at de samfund, som kan levere økonomiske fremskridt for deres borgere, opnår opbakning i deres befolkninger. Og det, kan vi se nu, er ikke nødvendigvis demokratiske samfund.« God fornøjelse med denne langsomme samtale med en ven af huset, Branko Milanovic. Rune Lykkeberg

45mins

4 Feb 2021

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43. The moral price of capitalism – Branko Milanovic

Mind the Shift

Branko Milanovic is probably the world’s foremost researcher on inequality. His ”elephant graph” became famous some years ago because it highlighted what many intuitively knew: During the two decades up until the financial crisis, incomes in Asia went up a lot, as did the incomes of the richest percent in the West. Squeezed in the middle was the middle class in the West, whose incomes stood still. ”It highlighted the plutocracy and the contradictions of globalization”, says Milanovic. He points out that the connection between wealth and political power is stronger in the western world than many realize. The US is the most dramatic example. ”Issues that matter to the upper middle class are much more frequently discussed in parliaments than issues important to people who are poor.” Will the pandemic exacerbate or diminish inequality? ”It’s complicated.” Some rich countries have had big drops in GDP, China has fared well, while India has fared poorly. Also within countries you see contradictory movements. Affluent people have been able to continue working from home, but on the other hand government transfers to the less affluent have more than compensated for their losses. ”It’s too early to draw any conclusions.” The rise of Asia means there is a rebalancing of the world happening. The relative wealth of Asia is catching up to where it was before the industrial revolution. Now it is Africa that is at the center stage of development. Africa needs sustained growth of around 7 percent a year for two generations to achieve any substantial catch-up. ”Without convergence of African incomes we will have two big negative effects: large migration will continue and global inequality will increase.” Milanovic is personally in favor of migration as a means of diminishing global imbalances, in the same way that capital is allowed to move. But the resistance among people in the receiving countries is real. Therefore he suggests a kind of sub-citizenship for immigrants that would allow for circular migration. ”My fear is that if we accept the reluctance to allow migrants in we will get ’fortress Europe’. The middle way is to make it possible to migrate to Europe and make money but not to have an open way to citizenship and permanent residence. But workers’ rights must be the same for all.” What about the many protests we see in the streets across the globe? Are they an indication that there is a growing popular resentment against the system? ”The resentment is there. But they are not questioning the way capitalism is organized. They are questioning some of its side effects: inequality, unfairness, environmental damage”, says Branko Milanovic. He sees two grassroots trends that could constitute some kind of alternative to traditional capitalism: ”One is the movement of stakeholder capitalism. Then the shareholders would not be the sole factor influencing corporate decision making. The other one is the green economy. There I am more skeptical since they talk of degrowth.” ”If our value system were to be changed, so that acquisition of wealth weren’t our priority over priorities, capitalism would change.” Branko Milanovic is currently a visiting presidential professor at the City University in New York. Here is his CV.

1hr 7mins

3 Feb 2021

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