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Dennis Wall

5 Podcast Episodes

Latest 28 Aug 2021 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

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S2 Episode Ten: Dennis Wall and Corwin Connor

Surviving Matters

Welcome to Season Two of Surviving Matters! My name is Holly Lynch, I live in New York City and I’m a two-time cancer survivor. Last year, I did a podcast asking other people how they’ve survived the trials in their lives. It was a very personal question; these are stories I’m very proud to have produced. But this year Covid changed everything; including our ideas of survival. So for this season I tracked down community leaders, those whose job it is to figure out how to make it work and asked them how we get through this. Episode Ten is a conversation with Corwin Connor and Dennis Wall, founders of FREE Group a comprehensive financial education 501(c)(3). Thank you and thanks for listening!

18mins

11 Nov 2020

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Autism Diagnosis and Treatment with Dennis Wall

School's In

Dennis Wall, an associate professor of pediatrics, psychiatry, and biomedical data sciences at the Stanford School of Medicine, talks about understanding different levels of autism in kids, and how to diagnose and treat them.

28mins

13 May 2019

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Autism Diagnosis and Treatment in Kids with guest Dennis Wall

Stanford Radio

School's In with Dan Schwartz and Denise Pope:"Autism Diagnosis and Treatment in Kids with guest Dennis Wall"Dennis Wall talks about understanding levels of autism in kids through diagnosis and treatment.Originally aired on SiriusXM on May 11, 2019.Recorded at Stanford Video.

28mins

13 May 2019

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Dennis Wall: The changing face of autism diagnosis and treatment

The Future of Everything presented by Stanford Engineering

The current process for diagnosing autism requires no less than 10 hours of intensive doctor-to-patient observation. It is expensive and time-consuming, says autism expert Dennis Wall, an associate professor of pediatrics and of biomedical data science at Stanford. Wall is developing new ways to tackle the problem. He says advances in machine learning, a branch of artificial intelligence focused on training computers to perform important medical tasks, stand to shake up the field. He’s developing computer models that can spot autism by watching just a few minutes of video of a child at play in their natural home environment. With these technologies, diagnosis happens in as little as four minutes. In addition, Wall says, scoring can be done by non-experts, rather than highly trained psychiatrists, lowering the costs further. He thinks such AI models could reduce bottlenecks and get kids with autism into treatment sooner, a key to maximizing the treatment’s effect. Beyond diagnosis, Wall says that digital technologies together with AI are also changing therapeutics. For example, he’s developing augmented reality applications, one for Google Glass, that can help autistic kids better recognize and learn emotional cues – anger, joy, sadness – in the faces of others, a particular challenge for those with autism. Another that goes beyond the wearable form factor to even more ubiquitous technologies – your phone – is an app that can teach social skills through fun but poignant AI-enabled games, such as charades, where imitation advances the child’s social skills as the AI engine tracks progress automatically. Join host Russ Altman and autism expert Dennis Wall for a peek into the rapidly changing world of autism diagnosis and treatment. You can listen to the Future of Everything on Sirius XM Insight Channel 121, iTunes, SoundCloud and Stanford Engineering Magazine.

28mins

3 Apr 2019

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E76 | Dennis Wall: The changing face of autism diagnosis and treatment

Stanford Radio

The Future of Everything with Russ Altman:"Dennis Wall: The changing face of autism diagnosis and treatment"AI is reshaping diagnosis of autism, making it quicker, less expensive and more accurate. As a result, interventions are coming earlier in life, a key to more effective treatment.The current process for diagnosing autism requires no less than 10 hours of intensive doctor-to-patient observation.It is expensive and time-consuming, says autism expert Dennis Wall, an associate professor of pediatrics and of biomedical data science at Stanford. Wall is developing new ways to tackle the problem.He says advances in machine learning, a branch of artificial intelligence focused on training computers to perform important medical tasks, stand to shake up the field. He’s developing computer models that can spot autism by watching just a few minutes of video of a child at play in their natural home environment.With these technologies, diagnosis happens in as little as four minutes. In addition, Wall says, scoring can be done by non-experts, rather than highly trained psychiatrists, lowering the costs further. He thinks such AI models could reduce bottlenecks and get kids with autism into treatment sooner, a key to maximizing the treatment’s effect.Beyond diagnosis, Wall says that digital technologies together with AI are also changing therapeutics. For example, he’s developing augmented reality applications, one for Google Glass, that can help autistic kids better recognize and learn emotional cues – anger, joy, sadness – in the faces of others, a particular challenge for those with autism. Another that goes beyond the wearable form factor to even more ubiquitous technologies – your phone – is an app that can teach social skills through fun but poignant AI-enabled games, such as charades, where imitation advances the child’s social skills as the AI engine tracks progress automatically.Originally aired on SiriusXM on March 23, 2019.Recorded at Stanford Video.

28mins

25 Mar 2019