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Tammy Duckworth

29 Podcast Episodes

Latest 6 Nov 2021 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

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Disability Rights in the Workplace | Tammy Duckworth & Michael Pollan

The Daily Show With Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

Senator Tammy Duckworth talks about disability rights, Michael Kosta quizzes people about current events, and author Michael Pollan discusses "This Is Your Mind on Plants.” Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

45mins

22 Oct 2021

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Sen. Tammy Duckworth calls for a 'real, cold-hard facts look' at US' failed 20-year war in Afghanistan

Global Security

Twenty years ago today, less than a month after 9/11, then-President George W. Bush addressed the nation to announce the US-led invasion of Afghanistan."Good afternoon. On my orders, the United States military has begun strikes against al-Qaeda terrorist training camps and military installations of the Taliban regime in Afghanistan," Bush said.Related: 'Why don’t you have mercy?': Afghanistan’s Hazara people increasingly face eviction, violence under Taliban ruleFast forward two decades, and this year in August, Afghanistan fell to the Taliban again, followed by an address to the nation by President Joe Biden announcing the end of the war."Our mission in Afghanistan has taking many missteps, made many missteps, over the past two decades," said Biden. "I'm now the fourth American president to preside over war in Afghanistan. Two Democrats and two Republicans. I will not pass this responsibility onto a fifth president."Related: The Afghan government and the US lost popular support over corruption in Afghanistan, investigator general saysNow, Illinois Democratic Senator Tammy Duckworth, herself a veteran, has called for a commission to study the past 20 years of US involvement in Afghanistan. She joined The World's host Marco Werman from Washington to explain what it entails.Marco Werman: You've called your proposal, senator, the Afghanistan War Study Commission. What do you hope it will achieve?Sen. Tammy Duckworth: Well, I hope that it will achieve a comprehensive look at the various errors that have been made by all the different folks involved and gives us the lessons learned so that we don't enter into another quagmire like the one we've been in for 20 years in Afghanistan. We know that the United States will be involved in future conflicts. We need to make sure that we don't get ourselves into a situation where we spend 20 years at war in a country, only to come away and have the people who were in charge when we got there put back in charge when we leave.There have already been a series of lessons learned, reports on the Afghanistan war. How will your committee and investigation be different?Well, the key thing is that I want it to be completely nonpartisan, not bipartisan, but nonpartisan. I've served on bipartisan commissions before. I served on the Benghazi Commission, for example. That was bipartisan, but it was highly political. I want this to be a real, cold-hard facts look. I don't want anybody on a commission that was in any position of decision making or authority during those 20 years. So, not a past secretary of defense who was in charge at the time, not a previous president, not a member of Congress. This needs to be someone who can lead this commission, much like the 9/11 Commission, and bring us the lessons learned, whether it is the legislative branch failing to reauthorize a new authorization for use of military force or presidents choosing to do a troop surge or the corruption, trying to do nation building with the military as opposed to nation building with the State Department. All of the things that led us to where we are today. What we really need to do is make sure that we do this in a systematic way. I think the 9/11 Commission is a great example of the kind of work that can be done. And it must produce actionable recommendations. Like what? What would you see as an actionable recommendation?Well, I think, if you look at contracting, a significant portion of what happened is corruption within the Afghanistan government, within their national security forces. We know about the ghost soldiers in that we paid for the salaries of many, many thousands of so-called Afghan national security forces who never existed, and in fact, were on the books only, and their commanders collected that money. That corruption piece is really important. We certainly need to do an actionable recommendation for Congress [that] would be any type of authorization for use of military force must sunset after three years or must sunset after five years. You must have a new look at a new debate, instead of keeping an old one that lasts 20 years. So, there are things that can be done. You were on the committee that investigated the disaster at the US embassy in Benghazi, Libya, in 2012. That turned out to be a deeply politicized committee. What did you learn from that?Not to make it bipartisan. Make it nonpartisan. Don't let the politicians get involved. And if you watch the Benghazi Commission and watch my questioning, you'll see that I tried really hard to keep my questions and my focus solely on, what are the lessons learned that we never have an ambassador get killed in that way, so that we never have an embassy that's not listening to the intelligence community or is overriding what military leaders are saying, "hey, we should be doing this." It was my experience on the Benghazi Committee that led me to say, "Hey, what this needs is complete independence." I don't want it to be bipartisan, I want it to be nonpartisan, and I don't want anybody that had any skin in the game in terms of they were part of the decision-making process to be part of this of this analysis. It needs to be a cold, hard, independent look, with real actionable recommendations coming out of it. That's how we can best serve the American people with this commission. Senator, when do you think the committee would present its findings? And are you worried that if it takes a few years, a report on what went wrong from 2001 to 2021 might not be must-read material anymore?Well, I think it will be must-read materials. I mean, I'm still looking at lessons learned from the Civil War. You know, when I was an ROTC cadet, they took us to Gettysburg and we reenacted all of the battles and talked about the lessons learned from Gettysburg. In a 21st century army, we were learning about Gettysburg. I think lessons learned here will be relevant for many, many more decades into our nation's future. But what I do want to come out of it is, in addition to the long-term results, I think there will be many-short term findings that we can find out right away. For example, one of the things that we're hearing is that, I've known this, but it's the State Department that calls for the evacuation of civilians on the ground. what's called the noncombatant evacuation operations. The decision to start that is not the DOD [Department of Defense]. It's actually the State Department. So, there are some things that are more short-term lessons learned that we can get the results of in the next months or the first six months, the first 12 months of this commission. Some things are going to take many years for us to get the results for. But I think we're going to see findings and results coming out all along the way, even as the commission continues to work.Finally, you've been a senator since 2017. Prior to that, we must remember you were deployed to Iraq. That was 2004. And then later that year, your Blackhawk helicopter came under attack from an insurgent rocket, a horrific attack that left you a double amputee. How much did your own experience energize a desire to not leave any stones unturned from the last 20 years of war in Afghanistan?My personal experience is the core of who I am. I should have died on that day in Iraq, and my buddies didn't give up on me. And those same buddies later on returned and did more deployments. And that was really at the heart of why I wanted this commission, because our troops, over the last 20 years, many of them have had three, four, five, six, seven, I've heard of 10, 12 deployments. And every time we asked our troops to go overseas and they stand up and they salute, and they say, "Yes, sir," and they packed their rucksacks and they go. And I feel like we, who are here at home, just haven't lived up to the dedication and the sacrifices that these troops made. And one of the things that we can do is to make sure we don't make the same mistakes ever again if there are lessons can be learned. And so, yeah, my experience as a soldier does drive me now, because I feel that I owe my life to the men who saved me. And that means that now that I am in this position as a United States senator, that I'm not going to shirk that duty, so that, you know, my buddies have sons and daughters who are serving. And maybe someday one of my two girls will serve. And I want to make sure that we do right by them. And one of the things we can do is to have a cold, hard look when we make mistakes, learn those lessons and let's not make them again. This interview has been lightly edited and condensed for clarity.

7 Oct 2021

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Miscarriage Leave Update with Senator Tammy Duckworth

Money Rehab with Nicole Lapin

A few months ago, Nicole spoke about the importance of employers implementing a miscarriage leave policy after going through a miscarriage herself. In this follow-up episode, Nicole speaks with Senator Tammy Duckworth on the Support Through Loss Act, legislation providing for paid time off after the loss of pregnancy, or other challenges to starting a family. Plus, Nicole talks with her partner Joe Sanberg about their experience taking time off after their miscarriage, and how he implemented miscarriage leave at his company.If you’d like to sign Nicole’s petition urging companies to offer miscarriage leave, click here: https://www.change.org/p/businesses-companies-need-to-have-miscarriage-leaveIf you'd like to learn how to get in touch with your local representative to talk about the Support Through Loss Act, click here: https://www.house.gov/representatives/find-your-representative Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

20mins

5 Oct 2021

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Sen. Tammy Duckworth Tells Her Story

The Al Franken Podcast

Sen. Duckworth tells about growing up in Thailand, joining the Army, and being grievously wounded in combat. Gruesome, harrowing, and…very funny!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

46mins

9 May 2021

Most Popular

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Connected to Chicago with Bill Cameron (05-09-2021) Special Guest-U.S. Senator Tammy Duckworth

Connected to Chicago with Bill Cameron

U.S. Senator Tammy Duckworth joins Connected to Chicago. Download the podcast now, and listen live this Sunday at 7pm on WLS-AM 890

46mins

7 May 2021

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The Economist Asks: Tammy Duckworth

The Economist Podcasts

In 2004 Tammy Duckworth was shot down by Iraqi insurgents while she was serving in the army and lost both legs in the attack. As America withdraws troops from Afghanistan, Anne McElvoy asks the Illinois senator about the legacy of America's interventions abroad and whether President Biden is making the right decision. The first Thai-American woman in Congress says there is "enough pie for everyone" and minority groups in Congress should work together. Also, what scares her?  Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastofferSee acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

27mins

29 Apr 2021

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The Economist Asks: Tammy Duckworth

The Economist Asks

In 2004 Tammy Duckworth was shot down by Iraqi insurgents while she was serving in the army and lost both legs in the attack. As America withdraws troops from Afghanistan, Anne McElvoy asks the Illinois senator about the legacy of America's interventions abroad and whether President Biden is making the right decision. The first Thai-American woman in Congress says there is "enough pie for everyone" and minority groups in Congress should work together. Also, what scares her?  Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastofferSee acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

27mins

29 Apr 2021

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Ep. 438 — Sen. Tammy Duckworth

The Axe Files with David Axelrod

When Senator Tammy Duckworth was shot down over Iraq while serving in the US Army, she did not notice at first that her legs were mostly gone, destroyed by the blast. After countless surgeries and hours of rehab, Sen. Duckworth eventually learned to walk on prosthetics. Her new memoir, Every Day Is a Gift, recounts her injury and recovery, as well as her childhood and rise to the US Senate. Sen. Duckworth talked with David about growing up in Southeast Asia and Hawaii and the financial struggles her family experienced, the challenges facing working mothers today, and why she refused to see then-Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld during her recovery at Walter Reed Hospital.To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

45mins

12 Apr 2021

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Senator Tammy Duckworth on Her New Memoir 'Every Day Is A Gift'

KQED's Forum

Senator Tammy Duckworth lost both legs when the Blackhawk helicopter she was co-piloting was shot down in Iraq 16 years ago. In her new memoir, "Every Day Is A Gift," Duckworth recounts how her challenging childhood prepared her to deal with these devastating injuries as well as a life in politics. She's the first senator to give birth while in office and the first Asian-American senator from Illinois. We'll talk to her about her life, her work and what her political future holds. And we'll also hear about what's next on the Democrats' legislative agenda.

55mins

30 Mar 2021

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Gutsy Women (with Andra Day & Sen. Tammy Duckworth)

You and Me Both with Hillary Clinton

Hillary has always drawn inspiration from the “gutsy women” around her -- she and Chelsea even wrote a book about them. On today’s episode, we hear from two women who have defied expectations, overcome obstacles, and made some history along the way. First, Hillary speaks with Grammy-nominated singer and award-winning actor Andra Day. For the new film The United States vs. Billie Holiday, Andra immersed herself in the life of a woman who was supremely talented and fearless in shining a light on America's ugly history of lynching, even as she battled her own demons. Then Hillary talks to Tammy Duckworth, the senator from Illinois, about her new memoir, Every Day Is a Gift, about battling discrimination and picking herself up after loss, including a near fatal helicopter crash while serving in the Army National Guard. In a timely follow-up conversation, Hillary checks in with Senator Duckworth about her response to the rise in hate crimes against Asian Americans.Senator Tammy Duckworth is an Iraq War Veteran, Purple Heart recipient and former Assistant Secretary of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs who was among the first handful of Army women to fly combat missions during Operation Iraqi Freedom. She was elected to the U.S. Senate in 2016 after representing Illinois’s Eighth Congressional District in the U.S. House of Representatives for two terms. Tammy’s new memoir is titled Every Day Is a Gift.Andra Day started out her career as an R&B singer and songwriter, with her debut album Cheers to the Fall, which was nominated for Best R&B Album at the 2016 Grammys. She joined Hillary to perform during the 2016 campaign, and performed in the virtual Inaugural Parade for President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris. She portrays Billie Holiday in The United States vs. Billie Holiday for which she received the Golden Globe for Best Actress and was nominated for an Academy Award. Read a full transcript here. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

1hr

30 Mar 2021

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