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Steve Holroyd Podcasts

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6 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Steve Holroyd. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Steve Holroyd, often where they are interviewed.

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6 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Steve Holroyd. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Steve Holroyd, often where they are interviewed.

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Steve Holroyd: The History Of Pro Box Lacrosse In North America (Pro Lacrosse Talk Podcast #74)

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In this episode of the Pro Lacrosse Talk podcast, Steve Holroyd of CrosseCheck.com joins to discuss the history of pro box lacrosse including the first game played at Madison Square Garden in 1932, first U.S. pro box lacrosse leagues in the National Lacrosse Association (NLA) and original National Lacrosse League (NLL), and how the Eagle Pro Box Lacrosse League / Major Indoor Lacrosse League (MILL) succeeded where other leagues failed. 

We also discuss how the MILL eventually became the NLL we know today, how box lacrosse continues to grow in popularity and how Commissioner Nick Sakiewicz has the league set up for successful future expansion.

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The Pro Lacrosse Talk podcast is the first and only lacrosse podcast covering all four professional lacrosse leagues (MLL, NLL, PLL, WPLL). Each week throughout the season we'll recap the games, provide analysis on the teams and feature exclusive postgame and off-the-field interviews with pro lacrosse players and coaches. Suit up and give us a listen!

Follow us on Twitter and Instagram @prolacrossetalk.

Pro Lacrosse Talk is proud to partner with Stitcher Premium. Try 1 month of Stitcher Premium for free by using the code "LACROSSE" today!

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Mar 19 2020 · 46mins
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149: “America’s” Soccer League – With Steve Holroyd

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Society for American Soccer History board director Steve Holroyd returns to help us decipher the last decade of the enigmatic second incarnation of the American Soccer League (1933-1983) – the longest-lasting “professional” soccer circuit in US history prior to today’s MLS.

A smaller-scaled reboot of the original ASL (1921-33) that, for a time, rivaled the fledgling sport of pro football in terms of fan interest – “ASL II” began its more-modest life playing in the urban centers of the Eastern Seaboard during the height of the Great Depression. 

For much of its 50-year existence, the ASL was a relatively loose but heartily competitive amalgam of ethnically-identified clubs concentrated primarily in the immigrant-heavy neighborhoods of the industrial Northeast.  Teams came and went with regularity – and changing identities or even folding in the middle of a season was not uncommon.

As the “big league” NASL gained popularity in the early 1970s, the American Soccer League began to expand its geographic footprint and more professionally emulate its younger cousin.  By 1972, the league had mostly abolished its ethnic team names (out: Newark Ukrainian Sitch, New York Greeks; in: New Jersey Brewers, New York Apollo), and league president Eugene Chyzowych began steering the ASL to a more pronounced embrace of American players, while aggressively pursuing national expansion.

The league even hired former Boston Celtics basketball legend Bob Cousy as commissioner in a bid to raise the ASL’s national PR profile.  Freely admitting he knew little about soccer, Cousy nevertheless elevated the league’s ambitions – adding franchises to the West Coast by 1976 and relocating league headquarters to media-friendly Manhattan.

Still, “America’s Soccer League” was mostly relegated to de facto second division status vs. the bigger-budgeted NASL; it was not uncommon for ASL teams to lose top players to the freer-spending NASL – though a number of aging marquee players like Eusebio, Rildo, and Phil Parkes found the reverse path just as remunerative.

Ultimately, the ASL’s major league aspirations were financially unsustainable (just like the NASL’s), and the league collapsed after the 1983 season – ushering in a dark period for the pro game that lasted until the launch of Major League Soccer in 1996.    

Thank you VisitArizona.com for sponsoring this week’s episode!

Feb 03 2020 · 1hr 52mins
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S3E5: Steve Holroyd (Hall of Fame, Upcoming MLS CBA, Bethlehem Steel)

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We return after a summer break with Steve Holroyd to discuss a number of non-goalkeeping events, specifically the 2019 Y’all of Fame class, the upcoming MLS CBA, and a mini-documentary PBS put out on the Bethlehem Steel. While Holroyd is not technically a goalkeeper, he provides a point of view as a historian and labor lawyer that many can’t match. So getting Steve in really fits the “everybody” in “everybody soccer”, although we’ll get back to goalkeeping in the next episodes.
Aug 28 2019 · 1hr 2mins
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109: The NASL Players’ Strike of 1979 – With Steve Holroyd

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Professional union labor lawyer and Society for American Soccer History sports historian Steve Holroyd returns to the podcast to go deep into one of the more curious rabbit holes in North American Soccer League history.

In early 1977, Ed Garvey, a labor lawyer and head of the newly-formed National Football League Players Association (NFLPA), recruited Washington Diplomats midfielder John Kerr to help gauge interest among his teammates and those of other clubs in forming a similar organization for the suddenly ascendant ten-year-old NASL. 

By the end of that summer, player representatives from all 18 league clubs agreed in principle to create the North American Soccer League Players Association (NASLPA), and on August 29th, 1977 – the day after the New York Cosmos’ dramatic Soccer Bowl victory over the Seattle Sounders in Pele’s US swan song – officially sought recognition by NASL owners to become the players’ collective bargaining entity.

Commissioner Phil Woosnam and league ownership quickly refused, fearing a threat to the still-fragile circuit’s integrity by a group run by a union of the NFL, with whom NASL owners already had a tenuous (and in the cases of Ft. Lauderdale’s Robbie and Dallas’ Hunt families, common ownership) relationship.     

With no progress towards recognition of the union either during the subsequent off-season or the next year, members of the NASLPA finally voted 252-113 to strike against ownership – announcing its intention to do so on April 13, 1979, one day before the league’s second weekend slate of regular season games.

What transpired next was five unprecedented days of confusion (would foreign imports risk deportation by playing during an American player work stoppage?); desperation (coaches Eddie McCreadie [Memphis] and Ron Newman [Ft. Lauderdale] donning uniforms to help their strike-depleted teams); naiveté (unwitting fans seeking Rochester Lancer “player” autographs during last-minute replacement tryouts); and ultimately, miscalculated futility – as player resolve waned almost immediately, especially among the association’s non-US residents, who actually made up the majority of the membership.

The players’ point had been made, however, and by mid-1984 – through a long series of subsequent court rulings – the NASLPA finally prevailed in its mission to collectively represent players at the bargaining table with league ownership.

Ironically, by then, it didn’t matter – the NASL folded in March of 1985.

We love our sponsors – Streaker Sports, 503 Sports, OldSchoolShirts.com, SportsHistoryCollectibles.com, and Audible – and you will too!

Apr 22 2019 · 1hr 49mins
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092: “Retro” Pro Lacrosse History – With Steve Holroyd & Dave Coleman

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We celebrate the (labor dispute-delayed) opening weekend of the National Lacrosse League’s 2018-19 season – as well as the return of the iconic Philadelphia Wings franchise – with two of pro box lacrosse’s most ardent fans and chief chroniclers.  

Metro Philly natives Steve Holroyd and Dave Coleman are the engines behind the historical treasure trove known as RetroLax.com, which digs deep into the history of the pro indoor game in North America – and features a wealth of hard-to-find stories and rare game footage from circuits like the original six-team National Lacrosse League of 1974-75, the one-year National Lacrosse Association of 1968, and, of course, the precedents to today’s NLL – 1987’s Eagle Pro Box Lacrosse and 1988-97’s Major Indoor Lacrosse League.

Holroyd and Coleman join host Tim Hanlon to discuss the origins of their interest in the game; their commitment to definitively “filling in” the surprisingly substantial and lengthy backstory of professional lacrosse in North America; what they’ve learned and who’ve they met along the way; and their thoughts on where the pro game is headed – as the NLL re-enters Philadelphia and expands into San Diego, and the outdoor Major League Lacrosse gets ready to battle the new Paul Rabil-founded, private equity-backed Premier Lacrosse League this coming spring.

Check out our great sponsors for all your last-minute “forgotten sports” gift-giving needs: SportsHistoryCollectibles.com, OldSchoolShirts.com, 503 Sports, and Audible!

Dec 17 2018 · 1hr 27mins
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episode eight - steve holroyd (soccer historian)

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Dec 01 2018 · 42mins