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Robin Givhan

15 Podcast Episodes

Latest 28 Jan 2023 | Updated Daily

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“Ruthless Self-Care” with Robin Givhan

Hysteria

Erin Ryan and Alyssa Mastromonaco discuss the Republican-led state attack on abortion and the “debate” about President Bidens to-be-named SCOTUS pick. Then senior critic-at-large and fashion critic at the Washington Post Robin Givhan joins to discuss the intersection of fashion and politics, how Michelle Obama changed the first lady style game, and curious case of the president’s pocket squares. Plus, Grace Parra and Kara Klenk stop by to discuss how to check in with a friend, how to ask for help, and the joys of the voice memo text. Finally, Sanity CornerFor a closed-captioned version of this episode, click here. For a transcript of this episode, please email transcripts@crooked.com and include the name of the podcast.

1hr 12mins

3 Feb 2022

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Re-Dressed: The Battle of Versailles, an interview with Robin Givhan

Dressed: The History of Fashion

This week marks the 45th anniversary of one of American fashion's greatest moments. Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Robin Givhan joins us to discuss a legendary fashion face-off between French haute couture and American design. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.comSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

55mins

4 May 2021

Similar People

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Robin Givhan on the US Capitol Siege and Vogue’s Kamala Harris Cover

The Business of Fashion Podcast

Speaking with Imran Amed, the Washington Post’s senior critic-at-large shares her thoughts on the controversially ‘familiar’ image of the vice president-elect, and explains where it sits within the wider political climate of the United States as it is due to enter a new chapter.When the cover of American Vogue’s February issue leaked on Saturday, January 9, a flurry of controversy ensued. Many took to social media to deride the image of vice president-elect Kamala Harris, lensed by Tyler Mitchell, for its casual styling, unflattering lighting and lack of gravitas. The criticism focused on the argument that the portrait lacked the stately deference they believed such a political figure — not least the first Black, South Asian female vice-president — should command.Among those to share their thoughts was Robin Givhan, The Washington Post’s senior critic-at-large who penned a column on January 11 in which she said “the cover did not give Kamala D. Harris due respect… It was a cover image that, in effect, called Harris by her first name without invitation.” Givhan, who became the first fashion writer to receive the Pulitzer Prize for Criticism in 2006, sat down with Imran Amed in the latest episode of The BoF Podcast, to further discuss the cover’s significance and the wider tumultuous landscape of US politics. Debating Harris’ portrait is about more than just a critique of the technicalities and production value of a fashion glossy. Its release comes at a time of political division and fraught race relations, just days after a violent right-wing mob stormed Washington D.C.’s Capitol building, an event incited by President Trump, who now faces a second impeachment for his involvement in the incident. “The last few years have been an exhausting, emotionally draining time,” said Givhan. “I was very surprised that [the cover] became such an issue. I was really stunned that people were so exercised about it. When you think about it, it’s [like] pain from a thousand papercuts, and this was the 1001st papercut.”The informality of the image chosen for the print cover carries greater historical significance and weight. Vogue and Anna Wintour defended it as an extension of the Biden-Harris campaign’s platform of accessibility, which Givhan described as a “legitimate” point of view. But, she said, “I think that the upset is rooted not so much in the current moment but its history. Throughout history, Black women in particular were not given the kind of respect that white women were. People had this familiarity with Black women that was not about friendship and equality but was condescending. Understanding the complicated nature of that would give one pause in presenting the first female vice president — a Black woman — in that way.”While the alternative digital cover image, which depicts Harris in a more presidential light and formal style, offers some reprieve, this print issue has significance as a cultural souvenir (“you can’t give a screengrab to your grandchildren,” said Givhan), and there is no real opportunity for a do-over. “There’s no way to make people happy,” said Givhan, adding that it’s important to instead listen to criticism and “recognise where things went astray” in allowing this misstep to happen. “You just have to do better the next time, and the time after that and the time after that.”External clips courtesy of Good Morning America and ABC7 News Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

29mins

14 Jan 2021

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Pulitzer Prize Winner Robin Givhan on Carving Out Your Niche, Growing a Thick Skin, and What Makes a Great Pitch

LEAVE YOUR MARK: Freshly Brewed Career Advice

Robin Givhan is the longtime fashion critic of The Washington Post. She covers Fashion from a business, entertainment, and cultural phenomenon point of view. She is the first and only fashion writer to ever receive the Pulitzer Prize for Criticism, an honor she received in 2006. She is also the author of The Battle of Versailles and Michelle: Her First Year as First Lady. In this episode, you will learn about Robin's journey from rookie reporter to one of the most respected journalists today, how to handle criticism, what makes a good pitch, and her biggest "PR" pet peeves.

56mins

23 Aug 2020

Most Popular

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An honest conversation about race and fashion: Pass the Mic to Henrietta Gallina & Robin Givhan

Fashion No Filter

In the final of three parts, Fashion: No Filter passes the mic to our guest editor Henrietta Gallina as we explore the role of mainstream media in the current climate. In light of the rallying cry for the fashion industry to put an end to ongoing systemic racism, Henrietta, Camille and Monica have been having some tough and candid conversations about the state of play and how they want to participate and show up in this moment. Their conclusion: Fashion: No Filter would share its platform in order to create meaningful dialogue and help foster understanding, learning and shared experiences in the most authentic way. In today’s conversation, Henrietta speaks to trailblazing fashion critic Robin Givhan who is a journalist at The Washington Post. Her work won her the Pulitzer Prize for Criticism in 2006 which is incidentally the first time the award was given to a fashion writer. The Pulitzer Committee cited Robin’s “witty, closely observed essays that transform fashion criticism into cultural criticism”. Henrietta and Robin begin with a birdseye view on the state of the industry today and move on to cover a range of topics. Robin explains why she claims in a recent piece that the fashion system was broken long before the pandemic hit and why it needs a reboot. They also discuss the racial fallout, performative marketing and smoke and mirror optics of advertising and inclusivity, cancel culture vs accountability and the importance of equity and equal representation. Robin who exemplifies the “only one” allegory in many ways, also looks back on her prestigious career and trajectory.As in the previous episode, the interview is followed by reactions and takeaways from your hosts Monica and Camille accompanied by Henrietta followed by a quick recap of the genesis of the project.Want more? Follow:@HenriettaGallina@RobinGivhan@WashingtonPost@TheConversations.podcastArticles mentioned:‘Fashion was broken before the pandemic. A reboot could be just what it needs’ By Robin Givhan.https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/fashion-retail-business-bankrupt-stores/2020/06/12/463572b0-9c56-11ea-ac72-3841fcc9b35f_story.htmlI May Destroy You — Happy Animals (episode 7) https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000kk4c 'Unequal Impact: The Deep Links Between Inequality and Climate Change' By Beth Gardiner.https://e360.yale.edu/features/unequal-impact-the-deep-links-between-inequality-and-climate-change-- Camille Charriere | @camillecharriereFreelance Writer, Consultant, CreatorMobile: +44(0)7980714484itunes.com/fashionnofilter Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

1hr 17mins

15 Aug 2020

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On The Record: Robin Givhan

Highsnobiety Podcasts

Between all the fluff that is fashion, there is Robin Givhan. The American author and fashion critic of The Washington Post, whose cutting-edge journalism and objective reporting on the fashion industry stands out. It won her the Pulitzer Prize for criticism in 2006. She was the first ever fashion writer to receive it. Back then, the prize stated she won the award for “her witty, closely observed essays that transform fashion criticism into cultural criticism.” Givhan's writing for the Post is indeed refreshingly honest, she always cuts through the bs, and she makes the elusive world of fashion digestible for her reader. It's why I wanted to speak with Givhan about a wide range of topics around how influence is changing, especially at a time when the fashion industry, like all other sectors, is in flux. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

59mins

22 Jul 2020

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On The Record: Robin Givhan

On The Record

Between all the fluff that is fashion, there is Robin Givhan. The American author and fashion critic of The Washington Post, whose cutting-edge journalism and objective reporting on the fashion industry stands out. It won her the Pulitzer Prize for criticism in 2006. She was the first ever fashion writer to receive it. Back then, the prize stated she won the award for “her witty, closely observed essays that transform fashion criticism into cultural criticism.” Givhan's writing for the Post is indeed refreshingly honest, she always cuts through the bs, and she makes the elusive world of fashion digestible for her reader. It's why I wanted to speak with Givhan about a wide range of topics around how influence is changing, especially at a time when the fashion industry, like all other sectors, is in flux.

59mins

22 Jul 2020

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A New Line with Robin Givhan and Prabal Gurung

Washington Post Live

On Nov. 15, fashion designer Prabal Gurung sat down with Pulitzer Prize-winning fashion Critic Robin Givhan to talk about his design philosophy and why he uses the runway as a platform for advocacy.

47mins

20 Nov 2019

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Robin Givhan, Katie Vanneck-Smith, Andrew Gallix

Monocle 24: The Stack

This week on The Stack we speak to Pulitzer prize-winning Robin Givhan, fashion critic for ‘The Washington Post’. Plus: Katie Vanneck-Smith from slow news outlet ‘Tortoise’ and author Andrew Gallix on why writers are fascinated by Paris.

30mins

17 Aug 2019

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The Battle of Versailles, an interview with Robin Givhan

Dressed: The History of Fashion

This week marks the 45th anniversary of one of American fashion's greatest moments. Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Robin Givhan joins us to discuss a legendary fashion face-off between French haute couture and American design. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.comSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

52mins

27 Nov 2018

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