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Eugenia Cheng Podcasts

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19 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Eugenia Cheng. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Eugenia Cheng, often where they are interviewed.

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19 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Eugenia Cheng. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Eugenia Cheng, often where they are interviewed.

Updated daily with the latest episodes

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Rethinking Gender With Mathematician Eugenia Cheng

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Podcast: On Point
Episode: Rethinking Gender With Mathematician Eugenia Cheng
Pub date: 2020-09-16

A mathematician turns gender into a math problem. We hear how math can help us rethink ingrained conceptions of gender. Eugenia Cheng joins Meghna Chakrabarti.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from WBUR & NPR, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.
Sep 18 2020 · 48mins
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Rethinking Gender With Mathematician Eugenia Cheng

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A mathematician turns gender into a math problem. We hear how math can help us rethink ingrained conceptions of gender. Eugenia Cheng joins Meghna Chakrabarti.

Sep 16 2020 · 48mins

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Eugenia Cheng - x + y: A Mathematician’s Manifesto for Rethinking Gender

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Dr Eugenia Cheng is Honorary Visiting Fellow at City, University of London and Scientist in Residence at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, where she teaches arts students to see the world differently through maths. A concert pianist, she also speaks French, English and Cantonese, and her mission in life is to rid the world of maths phobia. She is Math Columnist for the Wall Street Journal and the author of three books: the international best-seller How to Bake Pi: Easy Recipes for Understanding Complex Maths; the critically acclaimed The Art of Logic; and Beyond Infinity: An Expedition to the Outer Limits of Mathematics, which was shortlisted for the 2017 Royal Society Science Book Prize.

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Sep 08 2020 · 12mins
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Eugenia Cheng rethinks gender around maths

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Eugenia Cheng rethinks gender around maths

Dr Eugenia Cheng is a research mathematician who teaches maths to arts students at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She was born and educated in England and is an honorary hellow at the University of Sheffield. Eugenia holds a strong commitment to making maths accessible to all, and to this end, is the author of a number of popular maths books and articles.

Eugenia’s reflections on being a woman in the world of research mathematics make for interesting listening. She compares her experiences of teaching maths students and arts students and argues that associating certain behaviours with masculinity or femininity is unhelpful. To make the world of maths more open to all, she suggests we adopt a different way of thinking and talking – and even makes up some new words!

Her thought-provoking ideas about maths, gender, how children learn, and cooking (!) will be of interest to anyone wondering about why maths alienates some of their students.

Show notes

Taking part in the discussion are:

  • Dr Eugenia Cheng, Scientist In Residence, School of the Art Institute of Chicago
  • Gwen Tresidder, Communications Manager, NCETM
Episode chapters
  • 00:59: Eugenia’s background
  • 07:34: Teaching arts students vs teaching maths students
  • 09:08: How has teaching arts students developed Eugenia’s ideas about maths and gender?
  • 10:31: How a person’s feelings about winning or losing might be linked to whether they like maths
  • 13:13: Eugenia suppressing her femininity in order to succeed as a maths researcher
  • 14:52: How society has associated character traits with gender
  • 16:47: ‘Ingressive’ and ‘congressive’: new words for character types that are not attached to gender
  • 19:31: How might Eugenia’s ideas affect the way maths is taught?
  • 21:34: Making a safe classroom environment
  • 24:20: What sort of environment was Eugenia taught in at school?
  • 26:32: Removing the emphasis on right and wrong answers in maths
  • 29:14: How is maths like cooking?
  • 34:06: Where to find out more…

Useful links

Eugenia mentions the book: Christopher Danielson ‘Which one doesn’t belong?’ There is also an associated website.

Eugenia’s website: www.eugeniacheng.com

Eugenia also uses abstract mathematics analogies to explain the world we live in – in her TEDX talk she explains social inequality using prime factorisation!

Eugenia’s series of cooking videos ‘The Mathster Chef’ can be found at the bottom of this page

Nov 07 2019 · 34mins

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The Art Of Logic: Eugenia Cheng (2019)

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Eugenia Cheng’s mission is to rid the world of maths phobia. She holds a doctorate in pure maths from the University of Cambridge University, teaches at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, is a concert pianist, founded Liederstube (a non-profit organisation aimed at bringing classical music to a wider audience) and has written three books in which she proselytises the beauty of mathematics. They are How To Bake Pi – in which she posits that the béchamel in a lasagne resembles the number five; Beyond Infinity; and The Art of Logic – in which she links Euclid’s axiomatisation of geometry with sexual harassment. Cheng speaks and argues deftly with Tanya Evans.

Supported by Te Pūnaha Matatini.
May 31 2019 · 46mins
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Eugenia Cheng and Tim Radford on finding solace in science – books podcast

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This week, we turn away from the crowds of catastrophist headlines and dystopian fiction and discover hope in the world of science
Sep 04 2018 · 42mins
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Eugenia Cheng

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At first glance chocolate brownies, puff pastry and Battenberg cake don’t seem to have a great deal in common with theoretical maths, but Eugenia Cheng has harnessed her love of cooking in order to tackle the fear of maths so many of us share – and has published a book about it called How to Bake Pi.

Her mission is to rid the world of "maths phobia", and to this end she gave up her secure job teaching at Sheffield University to open up the world of maths to students from other disciplines as Scientist in Residence at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, which also gives her the opportunity to pursue her own research in Category Theory - the purest form of maths.

And she’s a highly accomplished pianist, performing in concert halls around the world, as well as founding Liederstube - a popular venue for lieder and art song in Chicago which has hosted performers such as Gerald Finley and Richard Wiegold.

Eugenia explains to Michael how chocolate brownies and pure maths are related; how she prefers to work in cafes and bars with pen and paper rather than on a computer, and how her intensely emotional response to music is a release from the intensely ordered world of pure mathematics. And they dismantle stereotypes about Chinese ‘tiger mothers’, girls and maths, and the idea that people who are good at maths are automatically good at music.

Eugenia chooses music from Bach’s Matthew Passion, Rachmaninov’s Second Piano Concerto – which she herself has played – and from Mahler’s Resurrection Symphony and Janacek’s opera The Makropulos Case, which take her on an emotional and philosophical journey towards a reconciliation with mortality.

Producer: Jane Greenwood
A Loftus production for BBC Radio 3
Sep 02 2018 · 35mins
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PW Radio 291: From the Archives %2D Eugenia Cheng

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Mathematician and professor Eugenia Cheng explains 'How to Bake π: An Edible Exploration of the Mathematics of Mathematics.'
Aug 17 2018 · 33mins
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055: Eugenia Cheng - Math in Unexpected Places

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Eugenia Cheng is a mathematician and concert pianist. Showcasing Math in Unexpected places is one of her passions as she believes that Math should be a fun project and NOT a Math problem.

Transitioning from a "standard academic professor career path" to a "DIY portfolio career” Eugenia is proud of building a freelance career for herself that has no blueprint.

She is Scientist In Residence at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and won tenure at the University of Sheffield, UK having previously taught at the universities of Cambridge, Chicago and Nice.

Eugenia holds a PhD in pure mathematics from the University of Cambridge. Her first popular maths book "How to Bake Pi" was featured on the Late Show with Stephen Colbert, and "Beyond Infinity" was shortlisted for the Royal Society Science Book Prize 2017.

Jan 31 2018 · 28mins
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Eugenia Cheng on the mathematics of mathematics

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Nothing annoys Eugenia Cheng more than the suggestion that there is no creativity in mathematics. Doing mathematics is not about being a human calculator, she says. She doesn't spend her time multiplying big numbers in her head. She sits in hotel bars drawing (mainly arrows) with a fine quill pen, thinking about how ideas from different areas of mathematics relate to one another and hoping to reveal a unifying, underlying logic to the whole of mathematics. Her area of research, Category Theory, makes algebra seem superficial. And if that makes your head hurt a little, don't worry. Feeling confused is an essential part of doing mathematics. 'You can't make progress without it' Eugenia says. Jim asks Eugenia what drove her to such a high level of abstraction and learns more about her mission to rid the world of maths phobia, by baking.
Producer: Anna Buckley

Photo credit: Paul Crisanti, PhotoGetGo.
Jan 23 2018 · 27mins
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