OwlTail

Cover image of Jim Clifford

Jim Clifford

9 Podcast Episodes

Latest 28 Aug 2021 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

Episode artwork

Episode 4: Marathon Swimming: The Inner Experience with Jim Clifford

All Things Contemplative

“My mind was racing with a thousand thoughts. I was not sure how I would deal with the long, dark hours to come but I soon noticed that each hand pull stirred up the bioluminescence in the water and broke up the darkness below. After I mentally adjusted to the dark space below me, I turned my focus to the night sky and the universe on display in the stars. I had rarely seen a night sky so bright and so full of stars…I got lost in the stars for several hours and the time passed as if I was time traveling…I realized that the whole ocean below me had lit up with its own show of bioluminescence…below me as deep as I could see, there were star-like dots of light, mimicking the night sky. I felt like I was floating in space, suspended between the sky and the sea. It was humbling and at the same time, felt primal on a level that is hard to articulate…it was the ultimate experience…time melted away in the largeness of it all.” (Jim Clifford, Catalina Channel night swim)Jim Clifford, attorney, farmer, and senior citizen shares how he trains his body and mind, the psychology of open water swimming including "the zone", how he manages his mind during the many continuous hours involved, his experience of two contemplative values silence and solitude when swimming alone for hours at a time, and transcendence in nature.https://openwaterswimming.com/2015/11/jim-clifford-thrice-as-nicehttps://www.clifforddebelius.comJane Goodall https://awaken.com/2020/05/mystical-experience-of-jane-goodall-ph-d/All Things Contemplative Blog 

40mins

23 Oct 2020

Episode artwork

PKD #19: Our first guest: Jim Clifford!

Pablo, Kristen & Dave

In Minneapolis and hereabouts Jim Clifford is best known as the bass player for The Wallets, a gone-but-not-forgotten band that was HUGE here in the eighties. He also happens to be one of mine and Kristen's dearest friends. But he's truly a man of wide travel, learning, and experience, and a great storyteller to boot. An hour is not enough time to even scratch the surface with Jim, but it's a start. Intro music is Listen To The Kid, a song Jim co-wrote for his New York band, Marbles, and outro music is a piano piece he wrote and performs called Bikes.

1hr 19mins

29 Jun 2020

Similar People

Episode artwork

Jim Clifford, “West Ham and the River Lea: A Social and Environmental History of London’s Industrialized Marshlands, 1839-1914” (UBC Press, 2017)

New Books in Science & Technology

In West Ham and the River Lea: A Social and Environmental History of London’s Industrialized Marshlands, 1839-1914 (University of British Columbia Press, 2017), Jim Clifford brings together histories of water and river systems, urban history, environmental history, and labor history. Using archival materials with a particular focus on Ordnance Survey...

1hr 15mins

24 Aug 2018

Episode artwork

Jim Clifford, “West Ham and the River Lea: A Social and Environmental History of London’s Industrialized Marshlands, 1839-1914” (UBC Press, 2017)

New Books in Peoples & Places

In West Ham and the River Lea: A Social and Environmental History of London’s Industrialized Marshlands, 1839-1914 (University of British Columbia Press, 2017), Jim Clifford brings together histories of water and river systems, urban history, environmental history, and labor history. Using archival materials with a particular focus on Ordnance Survey...

1hr 15mins

24 Aug 2018

Most Popular

Episode artwork

Jim Clifford, “West Ham and the River Lea: A Social and Environmental History of London’s Industrialized Marshlands, 1839-1914” (UBC Press, 2017)

New Books in Politics & Society

In West Ham and the River Lea: A Social and Environmental History of London’s Industrialized Marshlands, 1839-1914 (University of British Columbia Press, 2017), Jim Clifford brings together histories of water and river systems, urban history, environmental history, and labor history. Using archival materials with a particular focus on Ordnance Survey...

1hr 15mins

24 Aug 2018

Episode artwork

Jim Clifford, “West Ham and the River Lea: A Social and Environmental History of London’s Industrialized Marshlands, 1839-1914” (UBC Press, 2017)

New Books in British Studies

In West Ham and the River Lea: A Social and Environmental History of London’s Industrialized Marshlands, 1839-1914 (University of British Columbia Press, 2017), Jim Clifford brings together histories of water and river systems, urban history, environmental history, and labor history. Using archival materials with a particular focus on Ordnance Survey maps and historical GIS (geographical information systems), he explores Greater London’s second important river, the Lea, using it as a lens through which to track industrialization in the 19th and early 20th century. He shows how the River Lea made West Ham an attractive area for industrial development, drawing manufacturing and chemical plants to the area. Workers followed, and over the course the second half of the 19th century the area grew rapidly in population, so that West Ham became one of Britain’s largest industrial centers. At the same time, the River Lea and the marshlands through which it flowed were transformed by pollution and development, ultimately generating important political responses by the early 20th century.Jim Clifford is an Associate Professor of Environmental History at the University of Saskatchewan. His research focuses on the history of Britain and the British world during the long 19th century, with particular focus on the industrialization of Greater London and its relationships to global commodities. In addition to this work, he is developing a broader historical GIS project to track the distant environmental effects of commodity chains, which you can view here. David Fouser is an adjunct faculty member at Santa Monica College, Chapman University, and American Jewish University. He completed his Ph.D. in 2016 at the University of California, Irvine, and studies the cultural and environmental history of wheat, flour, and bread in Britain and the British Empire. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/british-studies

1hr 16mins

24 Aug 2018

Episode artwork

Jim Clifford, “West Ham and the River Lea: A Social and Environmental History of London’s Industrialized Marshlands, 1839-1914” (UBC Press, 2017)

New Books in Environmental Studies

In West Ham and the River Lea: A Social and Environmental History of London’s Industrialized Marshlands, 1839-1914 (University of British Columbia Press, 2017), Jim Clifford brings together histories of water and river systems, urban history, environmental history, and labor history. Using archival materials with a particular focus on Ordnance Survey maps and historical GIS (geographical information systems), he explores Greater London’s second important river, the Lea, using it as a lens through which to track industrialization in the 19th and early 20th century. He shows how the River Lea made West Ham an attractive area for industrial development, drawing manufacturing and chemical plants to the area. Workers followed, and over the course the second half of the 19th century the area grew rapidly in population, so that West Ham became one of Britain’s largest industrial centers. At the same time, the River Lea and the marshlands through which it flowed were transformed by pollution and development, ultimately generating important political responses by the early 20th century.Jim Clifford is an Associate Professor of Environmental History at the University of Saskatchewan. His research focuses on the history of Britain and the British world during the long 19th century, with particular focus on the industrialization of Greater London and its relationships to global commodities. In addition to this work, he is developing a broader historical GIS project to track the distant environmental effects of commodity chains, which you can view here. David Fouser is an adjunct faculty member at Santa Monica College, Chapman University, and American Jewish University. He completed his Ph.D. in 2016 at the University of California, Irvine, and studies the cultural and environmental history of wheat, flour, and bread in Britain and the British Empire. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/environmental-studies

1hr 16mins

24 Aug 2018

Episode artwork

Jim Clifford, “West Ham and the River Lea: A Social and Environmental History of London’s Industrialized Marshlands, 1839-1914” (UBC Press, 2017)

New Books in History

In West Ham and the River Lea: A Social and Environmental History of London’s Industrialized Marshlands, 1839-1914 (University of British Columbia Press, 2017), Jim Clifford brings together histories of water and river systems, urban history, environmental history, and labor history. Using archival materials with a particular focus on Ordnance Survey maps and historical GIS (geographical information systems), he explores Greater London’s second important river, the Lea, using it as a lens through which to track industrialization in the 19th and early 20th century. He shows how the River Lea made West Ham an attractive area for industrial development, drawing manufacturing and chemical plants to the area. Workers followed, and over the course the second half of the 19th century the area grew rapidly in population, so that West Ham became one of Britain’s largest industrial centers. At the same time, the River Lea and the marshlands through which it flowed were transformed by pollution and development, ultimately generating important political responses by the early 20th century.Jim Clifford is an Associate Professor of Environmental History at the University of Saskatchewan. His research focuses on the history of Britain and the British world during the long 19th century, with particular focus on the industrialization of Greater London and its relationships to global commodities. In addition to this work, he is developing a broader historical GIS project to track the distant environmental effects of commodity chains, which you can view here. David Fouser is an adjunct faculty member at Santa Monica College, Chapman University, and American Jewish University. He completed his Ph.D. in 2016 at the University of California, Irvine, and studies the cultural and environmental history of wheat, flour, and bread in Britain and the British Empire. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

1hr 17mins

24 Aug 2018

Episode artwork

Jim Clifford, “West Ham and the River Lea: A Social and Environmental History of London’s Industrialized Marshlands, 1839-1914” (UBC Press, 2017)

New Books in Geography

In West Ham and the River Lea: A Social and Environmental History of London’s Industrialized Marshlands, 1839-1914 (University of British Columbia Press, 2017), Jim Clifford brings together histories of water and river systems, urban history, environmental history, and labor history. Using archival materials with a particular focus on Ordnance Survey maps and historical GIS (geographical information systems), he explores Greater London’s second important river, the Lea, using it as a lens through which to track industrialization in the 19th and early 20th century. He shows how the River Lea made West Ham an attractive area for industrial development, drawing manufacturing and chemical plants to the area. Workers followed, and over the course the second half of the 19th century the area grew rapidly in population, so that West Ham became one of Britain’s largest industrial centers. At the same time, the River Lea and the marshlands through which it flowed were transformed by pollution and development, ultimately generating important political responses by the early 20th century.Jim Clifford is an Associate Professor of Environmental History at the University of Saskatchewan. His research focuses on the history of Britain and the British world during the long 19th century, with particular focus on the industrialization of Greater London and its relationships to global commodities. In addition to this work, he is developing a broader historical GIS project to track the distant environmental effects of commodity chains, which you can view here. David Fouser is an adjunct faculty member at Santa Monica College, Chapman University, and American Jewish University. He completed his Ph.D. in 2016 at the University of California, Irvine, and studies the cultural and environmental history of wheat, flour, and bread in Britain and the British Empire. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/geography

1hr 16mins

24 Aug 2018