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Paul Brislen

12 Podcast Episodes

Latest 28 Aug 2021 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

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Paul Brislen: Facebook have made major blunder over Australian news ban

Early Edition with Kate Hawkesby

Facebook may have made a major blunder by including emergency services in its ban on Australian news content.It's banned Australian users from sharing news content as the Australian Government proposes making tech companies pay news media for the content.Police, emergency, weather and health agencies, and retailers like Harvey Norman, have also been caught up in the ban.Tech and PR expert Paul Brislen told Kate Hawkesby Facebook is trying to convince the public it's in the right and it's failing."Catching the Fire Service in the middle of summer in Australia - that's a terrible move."That won't do anything to help their case at all. That just completely shot them in the foot." He says, by contrast, Google has agreed to pay and it's costing them very little to do so."The agreement they got with Nine Meida - $30 million a year - that's small change for Google, probably less than it would cost in lawyers' fees."LISTEN ABOVE

3mins

18 Feb 2021

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Paul Brislen: Facebook and Twitter taking action against Donald Trump

Holiday Breakfast

Facebook will ban President Donald Trump's account from posting for at least the remainder of his term in office and perhaps "indefinitely," CEO Mark Zuckerberg said in a blog post. "We believe the risks of allowing the President to continue to use our service during this period are simply too great," Zuckerberg wrote in the post. "Therefore, we are extending the block we have placed on his Facebook and Instagram accounts indefinitely and for at least the next two weeks until the peaceful transition of power is complete."The decision marks a major escalation by Facebook as it and other platforms have come under intense pressure from advocacy groups and prominent figures to ban Trump following his inflammatory rhetoric encouraging insurrection.Facebook and Twitter took the extraordinary step on Wednesday of temporarily locking President Donald Trump's account on their platforms after his supporters stormed the Capitol building to protest the election.If the latest restrictions hold, Facebook could be the first major platform to remove Trump permanently.Facebook's move now raises expectations for Twitter, known for being the president's preferred social media platform, to follow suit. Twitter has confirmed that Trump deleted several tweets in order to regain his tweeting privileges sometime on Thursday, though the company declined to say when precisely he would be able to tweet again.Twitter also said that "future violations... will result in permanent suspension of the @realDonaldTrump account.""There's this element of all the companies hand-wringing until one of them takes a step, and then in a few minutes, everyone does it," said Adam Sharp, Twitter's former head of news, government and elections. "Nobody wants to be the first, and they just take turns on who is going to be the first one to go that time around. Then they all 'Thelma and Louise' it and make the call."The underlying problem facing most tech platforms, he said, is that the gravity of Trump's misconduct goes far beyond the companies' efforts to build standardized systems for punishing misbehavior.In his blog post Thursday, Zuckerberg said Facebook had determined that Trump's recent posts were "likely" intended to escalate the violence rather than the opposite.Trump has shown he "intends to use his remaining time in office to undermine the peaceful and lawful transition of power to his elected successor, Joe Biden," Zuckerberg wrote.Facebook has already described the events surrounding Trump's posts this week as an emergency. Now, Zuckerberg has finally revealed where Facebook will draw the line for Trump — at nothing less than a deadly assault on Congress.text by Brian Fung, CNN

4mins

7 Jan 2021

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Paul Brislen: Survey reveals Kiwis' growing comfort-level with location-tracking

The Mike Hosking Breakfast

There's good news for the Ministry of Health as it prepares to integrate Apple and Google's automated contact tracing solution to its NZ Covid Tracer App.A new survey has found that more than two-third of Kiwis now believe their phone's location data - which keeps a record of all your movements, if enabled - can be used positively by government agencies to improve public services and emergency responses.And some 50 per cent say they have become more willing to share location data.Tech commentator Paul Brislen told Mike Hosking that Kiwis are getting used to location data being shared. He says that users need more education on what location data means and how it is used. "It's a good technology if you use it and you are aware of it, so it's really about informed consent." LISTEN ABOVE

2mins

26 Nov 2020

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Paul Brislen: What will happen to Trump's Twitter account after he leaves the White House?

Early Edition with Kate Hawkesby

Donald Trump's inflammatory Twitter account could end up being permanently removed.The US President won't be protected by the social media site's world leader exemption after Joe Biden's inauguration day.The social media site won't remove world leaders' accounts, as it claims everything they tweet is in the public's interest.Tech Commentator Paul Brislen told Kate Hawkesby Trump seems to genuinely believe the factual inaccuracies he's spouting."When he strays into this territory of coming out with outright lies, that's clearly grounds for blocking."I don't think he's likely to stop. I think he'll probably get three warnings and get chucked out on his ear."Already his posts after the election have been tagged with disclaimers the information may be unreliable.Brislen says we're relying on private companies to decide what's acceptable."I just don't think that's good enough. I think we need to have a much firmer view of what's allowed in our social media the way we do in our professional media."LISTEN ABOVE

3mins

8 Nov 2020

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Paul Brislen: Cyber hackers might be holding NZX hostage

Simon Barnett & James Daniels Afternoons

Cyber hackers might be holding New Zealand's stock exchange hostage.NZX has had to halt trading for the third day in a row after its website crashed because of offshore cyber attacks.A tech commentator predicts someone's holding it to ransom - by denying access to the website.Paul Brislen told Phil Gifford and Simon Barnett this is a common sort of attack worldwide.LISTEN ABOVE

7mins

27 Aug 2020

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Paul Brislen: Overall Spark Sport succeeded with RWC

Simon Barnett & James Daniels Afternoons

A technology commentator says despite the well-documented issues, Spark Sport succeeded with its Rugby World Cup service. The Rugby World Cup bronze final between New Zealand and Wales will be broadcast free to air with a one-hour delay on TVNZ1.The match was previously scheduled to stream solely on Spark Sport.Paul Brislen told Simon and Phil that while there were many streaming issues, overall Spark Sport delivered most of the games to the vast majority of viewers without major problems.LISTEN ABOVE

5mins

29 Oct 2019

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Paul Brislen: Why Twitter isn't the real social media problem platform

Early Edition with Kate Hawkesby

Twitter's boss is in Wellington today to meet with Jacinda Ardern, but a commentator's labelling the meeting 'second-best'.Jack Dorsey is continuing talks he started with the PM in Paris, where Twitter was among the first to sign the 'Christchurch Call' guidelines for countering online extremism.But tech commentator Paul Brislen told Kate Hawkesby Twitter's not the root of the problem."It doesn't quite get into quite the same realms of promoting content, getting paid to share vile and extremist content in quite the same way that Facebook does, and Facebook is the real problem here." He says Twitter was one of the big platforms which received little bad publicity in the wake of the mosque attacks."Twitter is equally as responsible for sharing content but has very little actual role in controlling any of the content that is shared. This is an opportunity for them to try and paint themselves as the good guys."

3mins

8 Sep 2019

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Paul Brislen: Why the Ministry of Culture breach is so serious

The Weekend Collective

A nightmare situation for hundreds of young people whose private details may have been compromised.Information around 300 young people gave to the Ministry of Culture and Heritage has been exposed because its web security wasn't up to scratch.It includes passports, birth certificates and drivers' licences, which had been used when those affected had applied to be part of Tuia 250 commemorations, marking 250 years since the Captain Cook landing.They information was not secure on the initiative's website due to a coding mistake.Tech commentator Paul Brislen told the Weekend Collective it's a big deal for those impacted."These are things that we use to identify ourselves for all kinds of service, so that's why this is such a serious breach."He says that when an organisation is asking for information, they have to be held responsible for it."Clearly, someone wasn't doing that in this case. I'd like to see the outcome of the inquiry into this find just who is being held responsible." Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern is Minister of Culture and Heritage, and admitted disappointment in what had happened. "The breach – which happened as a result of an information management issue - means that identity documents, and other personal information, were able to be accessed via the Tuia 250 website," Ardern said."This is very disappointing, and Manatū Taonga will be commissioning an external review to determine how this occurred. It is too early for me to comment further."

6mins

25 Aug 2019

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Paul Brislen: Why the Ministry of Culture breach is so serious

Politics Central

A nightmare situation for hundreds of young people whose private details may have been compromised.Information around 300 young people gave to the Ministry of Culture and Heritage has been exposed because its web security wasn't up to scratch.It includes passports, birth certificates and drivers' licences, which had been used when those affected had applied to be part of Tuia 250 commemorations, marking 250 years since the Captain Cook landing.They information was not secure on the initiative's website due to a coding mistake.Tech commentator Paul Brislen told the Weekend Collective it's a big deal for those impacted."These are things that we use to identify ourselves for all kinds of service, so that's why this is such a serious breach."He says that when an organisation is asking for information, they have to be held responsible for it."Clearly, someone wasn't doing that in this case. I'd like to see the outcome of the inquiry into this find just who is being held responsible." Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern is Minister of Culture and Heritage, and admitted disappointment in what had happened. "The breach – which happened as a result of an information management issue - means that identity documents, and other personal information, were able to be accessed via the Tuia 250 website," Ardern said."This is very disappointing, and Manatū Taonga will be commissioning an external review to determine how this occurred. It is too early for me to comment further."

6mins

25 Aug 2019

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Paul Brislen: Why the Ministry of Culture breach is so serious

The Weekend Collective

A nightmare situation for hundreds of young people whose private details may have been compromised.Information around 300 young people gave to the Ministry of Culture and Heritage has been exposed because its web security wasn't up to scratch.It includes passports, birth certificates and drivers' licences, which had been used when those affected had applied to be part of Tuia 250 commemorations, marking 250 years since the Captain Cook landing.They information was not secure on the initiative's website due to a coding mistake.Tech commentator Paul Brislen told the Weekend Collective it's a big deal for those impacted."These are things that we use to identify ourselves for all kinds of service, so that's why this is such a serious breach."He says that when an organisation is asking for information, they have to be held responsible for it."Clearly, someone wasn't doing that in this case. I'd like to see the outcome of the inquiry into this find just who is being held responsible." Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern is Minister of Culture and Heritage, and admitted disappointment in what had happened. "The breach – which happened as a result of an information management issue - means that identity documents, and other personal information, were able to be accessed via the Tuia 250 website," Ardern said."This is very disappointing, and Manatū Taonga will be commissioning an external review to determine how this occurred. It is too early for me to comment further."

6mins

25 Aug 2019

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