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James VI Podcasts

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21 of The Best Podcast Episodes for James VI. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about James VI, often where they are interviewed.

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21 of The Best Podcast Episodes for James VI. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about James VI, often where they are interviewed.

Updated daily with the latest episodes

Best weekly hand curated episodes for learning

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August 20 - A proxy wedding for King James VI in Denmark

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On this day in Tudor history, 20th August 1589, twenty-three-year-old King James VI of Scotland married fourteen-year-old Anne of Denmark by proxy at Kronborg Castle, Helsingør, Denmark. James had chosen Anne of Denmark as his bride after praying and meditating over portraits of her and Catherine of Navarre, and Anne was very excited about marrying him. Unfortunately, married bliss didn't last long. Find out more about the proxy wedding, Anne's eventful voyage, their real wedding and their married life, in today's talk from Claire Ridgway, founder of the Tudor Society. You can see this podcast as a video at the following link:https://youtu.be/EwyDv-9mtDY Also on this day in Tudor history, 20th August 1588, there was a thanksgiving service at St Paul's to thank God for his divine intervention when England defeated the Spanish Armada. It was thought that God had sent his Protestant Wind to save England from Catholic Spain. Find out more in last year’s video - https://youtu.be/wwCKaBRmA_4
Aug 19 2020 · 6mins
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Ep.12 - Timothy Peters - George III And The Porphyria Myth Diagnostic Implications For James VI

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Considerable doubt has been cast on the claim that King George III suffered from acute porphyria. The alternate diagnosis of recurrent acute mania is much more in keeping with his clinical features, but historians and their adherents still claim that suggestive features of acute porphyria in some of his ancestors, notably King James VI/I, support a diagnosis of porphyria in George III.

Assessment of his detailed and complex clinical history and features using the computerised diagnostic aid SimulConsult provides no support for porphyria in James but indicates a quite unexpected diagnosis that may help to explain the King’s medical condition and psychological behaviour.

Speaker: Professor Timothy Peters (University of Birmingham)
Jun 10 2020 · 33mins

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Ep.12 - Timothy Peters - George III And The Porphyria Myth Diagnostic Implications For James VI

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Read more
Considerable doubt has been cast on the claim that King George III suffered from acute porphyria. The alternate diagnosis of recurrent acute mania is much more in keeping with his clinical features, but historians and their adherents still claim that suggestive features of acute porphyria in some of his ancestors, notably King James VI/I, support a diagnosis of porphyria in George III.

Assessment of his detailed and complex clinical history and features using the computerised diagnostic aid SimulConsult provides no support for porphyria in James but indicates a quite unexpected diagnosis that may help to explain the King’s medical condition and psychological behaviour.

Speaker: Professor Timothy Peters (University of Birmingham)
Jun 10 2020 · 33mins
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Tudor Minute May 7: James VI/I arrives in London

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Today in 1603 James I arrived in London, nine days after the funeral of Elizabeth I. From 1601 onwards, as it became clear that James was going to be Elizabeth’s successor, many of her court kept up a secret correspondence with James. As the Queen was dying in 1603, her chief minister, Robert Cecil, sent James a draft proclamation of his accession in early March. Elizabeth died on 24 March, and James was proclaimed king in London later on that day.
May 07 2020 · 1min
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Broken Promises! Homeschooling the Gunpowder Plot and James VI and I

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Who knew that Broken Promises have a history?! Well they do and it's FASCINATING, and James and Sam explore the wonderful of history of saying you're going to do ONE THING and then doing SOMETHING ELSE instead. SO ANNOYING. And they focus in particular on the promises that James VI and I made to Catholics, how he broke them...and how those broken promises led to Guy Fawkes stashing 36 barrels of gunpowder under the Houses of Parliament...the Gunpowder Plot!

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 28 2020 · 25mins
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Broken Promises! Homeschooling the Gunpowder Plot and James VI and I

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Who knew that Broken Promises have a history?! Well they do and it's FASCINATING, and James and Sam explore the wonderful of history of saying you're going to do ONE THING and then doing SOMETHING ELSE instead. SO ANNOYING. And they focus in particular on the promises that James VI and I made to Catholics, how he broke them...and how those broken promises led to Guy Fawkes stashing 36 barrels of gunpowder under the Houses of Parliament...the Gunpowder Plot!

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 28 2020 · 25mins
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Slobbering! Homeschooling James VI and I!

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This fifteenth (yes, FIFTEENTH!) episode in the special series of Histories of the Unexpected Homeschooling explores SLOBBERING and JAMES VI AND I! The Unexpected History of SLOBBERING is all about disease and insanity and the history of teething (rubbing rabbit brains into the gums of infants). James and Sam explore the fascinating history of the James VI and I through the subject of slobbering, inspired by Anthony Weldon's famous description of this Stuart monarch. Learn about James's experience as king of Scotland, his learning and writing, his penchant for favourites, royal finances, his relationship with parliament and the divine right of kings!

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 22 2020 · 24mins
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Slobbering! Homeschooling James VI and I!

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This fifteenth (yes, FIFTEENTH!) episode in the special series of Histories of the Unexpected Homeschooling explores SLOBBERING and JAMES VI AND I! The Unexpected History of SLOBBERING is all about disease and insanity and the history of teething (rubbing rabbit brains into the gums of infants). James and Sam explore the fascinating history of the James VI and I through the subject of slobbering, inspired by Anthony Weldon's famous description of this Stuart monarch. Learn about James's experience as king of Scotland, his learning and writing, his penchant for favourites, royal finances, his relationship with parliament and the divine right of kings!

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 22 2020 · 24mins
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King James VI and I

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 This week, we learn about the Scottish, English, witch-hunting, God-fearing King James VI and I. Buckle up, it's a wild ride.

Jan 20 2020 · 54mins
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Ep70: Interview with James Loxley on the Rise of James VI/I

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When James VI of Scotland became James I of England, he did so as the son of Mary Queen of Scots, and brought with him a tumultous history and risk for civil war. In an example of the King’s extraordinary gift at diplomacy and unification, he also brought into England his ability to stabilize conflict and unite warring parties around his position as King. 

At 39 years old, when William Shakespeare was at the height of his career as a playwright in London, the new King would officially patronize Shakespeare’s company, and include the bard, the Burbages, and The Lord Chamberlain’s Men in his campaign to win the heart of England and unify the three nations. 

Here to help us explore the story of what it was like for William Shakespeare when Elizabeth died and King James came to the throne, as well as the religious reformations that defined the cultures of these nations, and divided the Scottish Kirk from the Church of England ideologically, is our special guest Dr. James Loxley. 

James Loxley is Professor of Early Modern Literature in the department of English Literature at Edinburgh. He has written widely on renaissance poetry and drama, with a particular focus on Ben Jonson and Andrew Marvell, and on the literature, politics and culture of the civil war period. His current research focuses on a collaborative project digitally mapping Edinburgh's literary cityscape, and a cultural history of the relations between England and Scotland in the early seventeenth century.

We are delighted to have him visit with us today to share with us the moment in Shakespeare’s life when he found himself finally under the official patronage of the English monarchy.

Aug 19 2019 · 28mins
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