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Human Cell Atlas Podcasts

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5 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Human Cell Atlas. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Human Cell Atlas, often where they are interviewed.

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5 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Human Cell Atlas. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Human Cell Atlas, often where they are interviewed.

Updated daily with the latest episodes

Testing for asymptomatic coronavirus carriers, Human Cell Atlas, and invasive parakeets

BBC Inside Science
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You can’t build up a picture of Covid-19’s spread throughout the UK without testing those who might have it and those who might have already had it. Britain currently is only testing people who are hospitalised, some healthcare workers and a handful of exceptions. The upshot is that we don't have reliable numbers on how many people in the community have, or have had, Covid-19. Even self-reporting doesn’t pick up those who carry the virus, but do not show any symptoms.
Professor Mike Bonsall is part of a team at Oxford University running a new project that seeks to change that. They want to estimate how common the coronavirus causing disease is in the UK, using a new diagnostic tool called nanopore sequencing. If you want to take part, have not had any symptoms and live in the Oxford area - https://covidstudy.zoo.ox.ac.uk/

You probably think you know your body like the back of your hand, but given that it’s made up of an average of about 37 trillion cells, some sort of guide book might be helpful. This is what the Human Cell Atlas, an international project, is doing. By providing a map of human cell types, aims to help researchers fight diseases, from cancer to covid19.
Although every cell in our bodies has the same genetic code – the same DNA; the differences between, for example, muscles cells, brain cells, and fat cells – come down to which bits of the DNA each cell uses - which genes are switched on and off. This gives cell types their different characteristics. The Atlas not only helps scientists understand the precise nature of each cell type but also how they interact with other cells in the body.

There are a lot of myths surrounding the source of the rose-necked parakeets in south east England. The introduction of these noisy green alien invaders have been attributed to Jimi Hendrix, George Michael and even Humphrey Bogart. But where did they really come from?

Presenter - Marnie Chesterton
Producer - Fiona Roberts

Apr 09 2020

28mins

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Futureproof Extra: The Human Cell Atlas

Futureproof Extra
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Feb 19 2019

9mins

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Ant Undertakers and the Human Cell Atlas

The eLife Podcast
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In this episode, we hear about disease control in insects, placental development, post-traumatic stress disorder, the mission to create a human cell atlas and how crickets amplify their song... Get the references and the transcripts for this programme from the Naked Scientists website

Feb 26 2018

32mins

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This podcast discusses an international project to map all cell types and states in the human body.

Aug 02 2017

17mins

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HFC Ban; Human Cell Atlas; Origin of Hunting with Dogs

BBC Inside Science
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Biologists are to begin a 10 year international project to map the multitude of different kinds of cell in the human body. The average adult is built of 37 trillion cells and if you look in a text book, it will say there are about 200 distinct varieties of cells. But this is a grand underestimate. There could in fact be 10,000. The Human Cell Atlas project aims to identify every type and subtype of cell in every tissue of the body - a massive endeavour which, the cell mappers argue, will have profound benefits for medicine.

Adam Rutherford also talks to zoological archaeologist Angela Perri whose research is aimed at discovering when our ancestors first started to use dogs as 'hunting' technology. Her work involves joining hunts with dogs in the modern day as well as traditional archaeological field work.

He also explores the science behind exploding smart phone batteries and the new international climate agreement to rid the world of hydrofluorocarbons.

Oct 20 2016

30mins

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