OwlTail

Cover image of Richard Thompson

Richard Thompson

62 Podcast Episodes

Latest 25 Mar 2023 | Updated Daily

Episode artwork

Richard Thompson Ford - Author of “Dress Codes” - Stanford Prof. of Law - Expert on Civil Rights - Antidiscrimination Law

The Creative Process · Arts, Culture and Society

Richard Thompson Ford is the George E. Osborne Professor of Law at Stanford Law School. His scholarship combines social criticism and legal analysis, and he writes for both popular readers and for academic and legal specialists. He's written for the Washington Post, San Francisco Chronicle, Christian Science Monitor, and other publications. He’s a regular contributor for Slate and has appeared on the Rachel Maddow Show, The Colbert Report, and other programs.His most recent book is Dress Codes: How the Laws of Fashion Made History. His books The Race Card: How Bluffing About Bias Makes Race Relations Worse and Rights Gone Wrong: How Law Corrupts the Struggle for Equality have been selected by the New York Times as Notable Books of the Year. In 2012, On Being a Black Lawyer called him one of the most influential black lawyers in the nation."We present ourselves and our bodies every day in public, and the way we do that is profoundly important. It's the way we establish a sense of self in a social domain. And clothing is the most direct way that's accomplished, and so of course it has political significance, and that's why it's always been regulated. Something that's trivial and superficial doesn't inspire a lot of rules and laws, but in fact, in our society up to the present day, there are lots of rules and laws around what people can wear. So those statements that are made can have profound significance at an almost subconscious level.That's why people were worried when African Americans [started dressing] in refined clothing because it suggested - against the dominant ideology of the time of white supremacy - that African Americans were refined and sophisticated. That's what that clothing suggests. When women [began wearing] masculine clothing, it suggested that those women could assert masculine privileges and masculine liberties because that's what that clothing suggested. It suggested that the women were not only refined, but also sober, practical, industrious - all of the things that women were denied in that context, and that made it a threat to the existing social order. And this is still true today."http://richardtford.law.stanford.eduwww.creativeprocess.infowww.oneplanetpodcast.org

53mins

28 Sep 2022

Episode artwork

Richard Thompson Ford - Author of “Dress Codes” - Stanford Prof. of Law - Expert on Civil Rights - Antidiscrimination Law

Books & Writers · The Creative Process

Richard Thompson Ford is the George E. Osborne Professor of Law at Stanford Law School. His scholarship combines social criticism and legal analysis, and he writes for both popular readers and for academic and legal specialists. He's written for the Washington Post, San Francisco Chronicle, Christian Science Monitor, and other publications. He’s a regular contributor for Slate and has appeared on the Rachel Maddow Show, The Colbert Report, and other programs.His most recent book is Dress Codes: How the Laws of Fashion Made History. His books The Race Card: How Bluffing About Bias Makes Race Relations Worse and Rights Gone Wrong: How Law Corrupts the Struggle for Equality have been selected by the New York Times as Notable Books of the Year. In 2012, On Being a Black Lawyer called him one of the most influential black lawyers in the nation."We present ourselves and our bodies every day in public, and the way we do that is profoundly important. It's the way we establish a sense of self in a social domain. And clothing is the most direct way that's accomplished, and so of course it has political significance, and that's why it's always been regulated. Something that's trivial and superficial doesn't inspire a lot of rules and laws, but in fact, in our society up to the present day, there are lots of rules and laws around what people can wear. So those statements that are made can have profound significance at an almost subconscious level.That's why people were worried when African Americans [started dressing] in refined clothing because it suggested - against the dominant ideology of the time of white supremacy - that African Americans were refined and sophisticated. That's what that clothing suggests. When women [began wearing] masculine clothing, it suggested that those women could assert masculine privileges and masculine liberties because that's what that clothing suggested. It suggested that the women were not only refined, but also sober, practical, industrious - all of the things that women were denied in that context, and that made it a threat to the existing social order. And this is still true today."http://richardtford.law.stanford.eduwww.creativeprocess.infowww.oneplanetpodcast.org

53mins

28 Sep 2022

Similar People

Episode artwork

S2 Ep14: I Never Thought It Would Happen - Richard Thompson

I Never Thought It Would Happen

Ace singer, songwriter and guitarist Richard Thompson is alongside Chris this episode to discuss the fine art of songwriting and making music. From his first album in 1968, aged 19, with Fairport Convention, then through 6 decades of a solo career, Richard's music making has always been fascinating, adventurous and critically acclaimed. From the first record he owned to playing festivals to the locations that inspire him to write, this is an insightful, inspiring episode.

41mins

23 Jun 2022

Episode artwork

60. RICHARD THOMPSON - Pushing The Physical and Mental Barriers in Discovering Your Ultimate Potential

The Bodies Built Better podcast

Today I chat with Ultraman World Champion and World Record holder Richard Thompson. A man of incredible endurance and described as "one of the greatest ultra-endurance athletes of all time”, Richard is not afraid to push past his limits and strip back everything he thinks he knows about the sport and himself, to achieve success. Richard shares how he got started in triathlons, his journey to Ultraman and the work and incredible team it takes to achieve this incredible task of completing an Ultraman in under 20hours. Richard shares how vulnerability is playing a major role in becoming an even better athlete, sharing the mindset shifts needed when addressing self doubt, lack of motivation and ultimately, failure. We also talk about his coaching business T:Zero Multisport coaching and how he and his team apply everything he has learned over the last 20 years to help athletes achieve their dreams in competing in triathlons and Ultramans all over the world. Such a wonderful and insightful conversation with an incredible person who is seeking his own untapped potential. What is an Ultraman: An Ultraman competition comprises of 321.6 mile journey (517.5km) and involves a 6.2 miles swim (10km), 263 miles of cycling (423 km) and 52. 4 miles (84 km) of ultra marathoning. Where to find Richard: Instagram: @richardthompsontri Website: Kanguru Sub20 Challenge Coaching: T:Zero Multisport If you enjoyed this episode of The Bodies Built Better Podcast please hit SUBSCRIBE and share it with your friends. Head over to The bodes built better podcast page  - https://jackietann.com/the-bodies-built-better-podcast/ Follow @jackietann_rmt and @bodiesbuiltbetter on Instagram Got questions, comments, or feedback? Get in touch via the above social media handles. --- Send in a voice message: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/bodiesbuiltbetter/message

1hr 25mins

4 Jun 2022

Most Popular

Episode artwork

Richard Thompson, ep. 166

Basic Folk

Help produce Basic Folk by contributing at https://basicfolk.com/donate/Richard Thompson's memoir, Beeswing: Losing My Way and Finding My Voice 1967 - 1975 (now out in paperback) is a page-turner of a read about a legend at the dawn of British folk rock. Thompson details his early days with Fairport Convention, one of the most influential folk bands of all time. He writes how they strived to be different and sought out then-unknown songwriters like Joni Mitchell and Leonard Cohen while adapting a modern sound for traditional British folk songs, some that were over 500 years old. He recounts tragedy when the band suffered a huge loss: the 1969 car accident that killed their drummer, Martin Lamble and Richard Thompson's girlfriend of just two weeks, Jeannie Franklyn. He writes about their first experiences in America: rolling around Los Angeles with the likes of John Bonham and Janis Joplin and their triumphant debut at The Philadelphia Folk Festival. RT was game to get into anything I threw at him: talk about experiencing such excruciating grief at a young age, what British fortitude means to him, did he ever really get to know his parents, being outwardly calm and inwardly chaotic. There's a chapter in the book where he details some session work he did in between the time he left Fairport Convention in 1971 and his solo work and work with his then-wife, Linda Thompson. I had a blast looking up all these albums on YouTube, especially Lal and Mike Waterson's Bright Phoebus from 1972. Very fun music and fun that RT is playing on it! I highly recommend his memoir and hold out my hopes that there may be a part two in his future. I think there is much left to write: his days after the very public breakup with Linda, establishing himself as a solo act and then coming back to work with his extended family in the group Thompson in 2014 on the album Family. Richard's got a busy summer ahead of him with a couple of cruises and the tenth anniversary of his writing camp, Frets and Refrains. I'm grateful he was able to make some time for us on Basic Folk!Advertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brands

55mins

26 May 2022

Episode artwork

Ep. 191 - RICHARD THOMPSON ("Shoot Out the Lights")

Songcraft: Spotlight on Songwriters

SUMMARY:Our guest is Richard Thompson, a  three-time Grammy nominee who has earned lifetime achievement honors from the Americana Music Association and the BBC Awards. Named one of the top 20 guitarists of all time by Rolling Stone magazine, Thompson is a highly revered musician and songwriter whose music has been covered by Elvis Costello, Robert Plant, REM, Emmylou Harris, and many others. Algonquin Books recently released the paperback version of Richard’s memoir Beeswing: Losing My Way and Finding My Voice, 1967-1975.  PART ONE:Paul and Scott talk about which music books they love, and one that Scott really hates. PART TWO:The guys chat about their friends at Pearl Snap Studios.PART THREE:Our in-depth conversation with Richard Thompson.ABOUT RICHARD THOMPSON:Our guest on this episode of Songcraft is three-time Grammy nominee and Ivor Novello award winner Richard Thompson. Named as one of the top 20 guitarists of all time by Rolling Stone magazine, Thompson began his career as one of the architects of the British Folk Rock movement with his band Fairport Convention in the late 1960s. The 1970s and early ‘80s brought a series of critically-acclaimed duo albums by Richard and his then-wife Linda Thompson. Two of those releases—I Want to See the Bright Lights Tonight and Shoot Out the Lights—were named among Rolling Stone’s 500 Greatest Albums of All Time. Returning to a solo career after the musical and marital partnership concluded, Thompson has released more than 20 solo studio albums and film soundtracks, and has earned lifetime achievement honors from the Americana Music Association and the BBC Awards. He was bestowed with an Order of the British Empire by Queen Elizabeth II at Buckingham Palace, and his song “1952 Vincent Black Lightning” was named by Time magazine on its list of the 100 Greatest Songs Since 1923.” As influential a songwriter as he is a guitarist, Richard’s music has been covered by Elvis Costello, Robert Plant, Don Henley, REM, Sleater-Kenny, David Byrne, Linda Ronstadt, The Five Blind Boys of Alabama, Emmylou Harris, Bonnie Raitt, Los Lobos, The Del McCoury Band, David Gilmour, Alison Krauss, Patty Loveless, Shawn Colvin & Loudon Wainwright III, among others. Algonquin Books recently released the paperback version of Richard’s memoir Beeswing: Losing My Way and Finding My Voice, 1967-1975. 

1hr 25mins

26 Apr 2022

Episode artwork

Best Of: Comic Jerrod Carmichael / Musician Richard Thompson

Fresh Air

Comic, actor and writer Jerrod Carmichael goes deeper into the secrets he reveals in his new HBO comedy special, Rothaniel — secrets about his real name, his family tree, and his sexual orientation. Carmichael's new special is directed by Bo Burnham. A previous one was directed by Spike Lee.Also, songwriter, singer and guitarist Richard Thompson, talks about his formative years. He co-founded the band Fairport Convention, which created a new genre – a hybrid of traditional music of the British isles and rock. His memoir, Beeswing, is out in paperback.

48mins

23 Apr 2022

Episode artwork

Fairport Convention Band Co-Founder Richard Thompson

Fresh Air

The British singer, songwriter and guitarist talks about his formative years, and about pioneering a new musical genre that blended rock with traditional music of the British isles. Thompson's new memoir is Beeswing.

45mins

20 Apr 2022

Episode artwork

The Harm of Microplastics in the Environment and Fighting for Fewer Single-Use Plastic with Richard Thompson

Finding Genius Podcast

How can the cast number of microplastics seeping into the environment be mitigated? Through possible legislation and better product design, it is still possible to turn the situation around. Listen up to learn: How microplastics are classified How product design can help stop the production of microplastics What stands in the way of legislation to alleviate the problem Richard Thompson, a Professor and Director of the Marine Institute at Plymouth University, shares his work combatting the effects of microplastics in the environment. Though recent efforts have made incremental progress, microplastics and the degradation of plastic remain significant problems. For example, even the microbeads of plastic in wash-off cosmetics take a tremendous toll on the environment.  However, there is still hope with a more conscious product design process in concert with governmental intervention. Still, there is much work to do to get government agencies to step in and intervene to produce more beneficial policies. Visit https://www.plymouth.ac.uk/research/marine-litter for more information. Episode also available on Apple Podcast: http://apple.co/30PvU9C

42mins

22 Mar 2022

Episode artwork

Operation Growth with Brandi Richard Thompson

The Wine & Chisme Podcast

Wine: Jose Wine Caves 2015 Mourvedre BIO:Brandi is the Founder of the Operation Growth Institute, a Global Transformational Learning Center where people can accept, heal, grow, and transform into the next iteration of their personal and professional best. For over twenty years, Brandi has honed her skill as a strategist, wellness expert, and coach. She helps clients identify their own solutions and specializes in coaching clients through her signature 12 steps to realize transformational growth. She examines how the barriers of generational baggage, fatherlessness, sexual trauma, single mother/fatherhood, racial identity and bias, and failure keep her clients from living their best life and helps her clients determine the next step. Brandi is a natural coach who has mentored and guided young leaders, honing her skills by providing personal and professional strategic support while leading young professional teams. She is also a certified Holistic Health Counselor by the International Board of African Thinkers, Priest and Healers, a certified Fatherless Daughters Advocate, and a student of the MMS coaching method. Brandi has studied with the Aspen Institute, Kellogg Foundation, Zuckerberg Institute, Iyanla Vanzant and the God Squad, Queen Afua, and Dr. Llaila Afrika. She studied for the International Coaching Federation accreditation with Dr. Cherie Carter-Scott.Website: https://brandirichardthompson.com/InstagramFacebook LinkedIn

59mins

2 Feb 2022

Loading