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44 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Ron Howard. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Ron Howard, often where they are interviewed.

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44 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Ron Howard. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Ron Howard, often where they are interviewed.

Updated daily with the latest episodes

The Craft of the Director with Ron Howard Part 2 (Ep. 259)

The Director's Cut - A DGA Podcast
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Director Ron Howard engages in an in-depth conversation with Jeremy Kagan about his filmography and the lessons he's learned over his career. The two discussed how blocking can improve a scene that lacks vigor, technical and craft-oriented concerns of A Beautiful Mind, and Apollo 13, and why Mr. Howard hates shooting endings.

Jun 12 2020

50mins

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Bradford Young, ASC- PART 2: Arrival, directors Denis Villeneuve, Ron Howard, and Ava DuVernay, Solo: A Star Wars Story, When They See Us, working on long form episodic vs. movies

The Cinematography Podcast
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The Cinematography Podcast Episode 78: Bradford Young, PART 2

Bradford Young continues our conversation from his busy household. One lesson he's learned is that the cinematographer's job is to make the director happy. Bradford was drawn to the science fiction film Arrival because it had an intimacy and a perspective about who we are that many sci-fi movies lack. Arrival takes us on a journey of discovery while keeping the human experience at the center of the film, with the camera following Louise, played by Amy Adams, the entire time. At first, Bradford found it difficult to find the visual language of the story, since it was so much about decoding the aliens' language. But his collaboration with Denis Villeneuve and the rest of the team makes Arrival feel cohesive and engaging. When Bradford was approached to shoot Solo: A Star Wars Story, he knew it would be a power move for his career, although it was uniquely challenging to work with four cameras plus huge action sequences and special effects. He also had to adjust to the turmoil of Lucasfilm's decision to fire directors Phil Lord and Chris Miller, who were replaced by director Ron Howard in the middle of the Solo shoot. But Bradford felt fortunate to be able to continue shooting Solo and to work with a seasoned and respected director like Ron Howard. Bradford was happy to work with director Ava DuVernay again on When They See Us, which was his first episodic series. He and DuVernay wanted to bring weight and care with their approach to the story of the Central Park Five, using minimal lighting, composed photographic shots and anamorphic lenses. For Bradford, When They See Us was a hard story to tell and they told it the best way they could. He feels that while films are powerful, they are also fleeting- sometimes it takes longer to tell and inform a story, and the injustices done to Korey Wise, Kevin Richardson, Raymond Santana, Antron McCray and Yusef Salaam was better served as a series.

Find Bradford Young https://luxartists.net/bradford-young/

You can stream When They See Us right now on Netflix. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VHbOt2M8md0

You can find Selma streaming on Amazon, Vudu, or iTunes. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x6t7vVTxaic

Bradford Young was featured in the May 2020 issue of American Cinematographer. https://ascmag.com/magazine-issues/may-2020

Find out even more about this episode, with extensive show notes and links: http://camnoir.com/ep78/

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Website: www.camnoir.com
Facebook: @cinepod
Instagram: @thecinepod
Twitter: @ShortEndz

Jun 11 2020

1hr 16mins

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The Craft of The Director with Ron Howard Part 1 (Ep. 258)

The Director's Cut - A DGA Podcast
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Director Ron Howard engages in an in-depth conversation with Jeremy Kagan about his filmography and the lessons he's learned over his career. The two discussed building relationships with collaborators, when he knows he's got the right shot, and directing difficult scenes in movies like Cocoon.

May 29 2020

41mins

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Ep 100. Ron Howard

Off Camera with Sam Jones
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When a 16-year old Ron Howard was hanging out on set with Henry Fonda (as one does), Fonda gave the young actor a bit of advice: If he loved acting, he should focus on theater, but, "If you love movies, become a director.” Ron Howard loved movies.

The Oklahoma-born son of two actors, his earliest memories are of memorizing dialog from his dad’s summer stock plays as a 3-year old. Walking unaware into an MGM kids’ casting call in 1959, Howard senior mentioned he had a son who was a fine actor. They called young Ronny in, had him do a scene, and asked his dad if he could do anything else. "I really don’t know if he can." Ron Howard entered our living rooms a year later as Opie in The Andy Griffith Show, and didn’t leave for the next 25 years when Happy Days ended in 1984. That’s when we really saw what else he could do.

He started directing in 1977 by convincing producer Roger Corman to let him helm Grand Theft Auto (Howard agreed to act in Corman’s Eat My Dust! in exchange). Next came Night Shift, and then, at a point where most directors are still paying off film school debt, he delivered Splash, Cocoon and Parenthood. They were all charming, funny, well reviewed and commercially successful; and yet we still hadn’t seen the extent of what he could do as a director.

What Howard excels at is telling stories that tell us something about ourselves; real tales of real people – albeit writ large – whose lives and worlds double as themes he wants to explore: family, teamwork, hubris and adversity, to name a few. Another particular genius is his ability to translate those worlds visually, forging a direct connection from our eyeballs to our gut or heart, as the story demands. Consider a tale that takes place largely inside the head of a brilliant but unstable mathematician. In its review of A Beautiful Mind, The New York Times called his technique “as simple as it is inspired,” adding, “Mr. Howard has found an accessible cinematic way to present this insight: Schizophrenia does not announce itself as such to those it afflicts. Mr. Howard leads us into its infernal reality without posting a sign on the door.” The film, an unexpected success, earned him an Academy Award for Best Director.

When he took us into Formula One racing with Rush, a lot of people went along reluctantly, only to be surprised at how one tight shot of a violently vibrating tire could make their heart race as fast as the motor shaking it. That shot signaled danger more effectively than any deadly crash. Variety thought so, too. “To witness this level of storytelling skill (applied to a subject only a fraction of the public inherently finds interesting) is to marvel at not only what cinema can do when image, sound and score are so artfully combined to suggest vicarious experience, but also to realize how far Howard has come since his directorial debut.”

He was able to make equally dramatic cinema from two men sitting across from each other, talking. “You expect something dry, historical and probably contrived. But you get a delicious contest of wits, brilliant acting and a surprisingly gripping narrative,” said the Washington Post about Frost/Nixon. “Howard's cinematic treatment deftly exploits very conventional narrative techniques without one ever being quite aware of them.”

But of course the film that feels closest to his core as a filmmaker is Apollo 13. It has it all: exploration, heroism, history and the compelling factor of being true. Noting that the subject matter demanded Howard’s reverential treatment, the Los Angeles Times called it his most impressive film to date in a 1995 review. “Howard's willingness to be straight ahead with his directing, the film's derring-do aspects have the advantage of showing the men simply being heroic as opposed to acting like heroes.”

If some critics have made cynical dismissals of a perceived gee-whiz, all-American, hero-worshipping aesthetic, Howard makes no apologies. “I’m drawn toward celebratory stories. I feel that they are every bit as valid and useful as the darker, cautionary tales. And my favorite thing is when the celebration is not up front and in your face, but something that evolves. It’s something you can understand, that flawed characters can be a part of moments that are worthy of celebration and respect.” That’s sounding pretty good to us these days.

Howard’s work continues to follow his fascinations, from the depths (In the Heart of the Sea) to music (Made in America, The Beatles: Eight Days a week) to boxing (Cinderella Man). We explore along with him again in National Geographic’s first-ever scripted series Genius. His new anthology drama chronicles the world’s most brilliant innovators, kicking off with the famous physicist Albert Einstein. In it, and all of his work, Howard approaches his subjects with eye of a historian, a fan, a geek, and a loving adherent to detail.

So, how to summarize the life's work of someone whose 63-year career spans two Golden Ages of Television and some of the most acclaimed and successful movies of every genre? Fortunately we don’t have to; it’s still very much in progress.

May 21 2020

1hr 8mins

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2020.18 Roll Over Beethoven (Indianapolis) -- Chuck Gunderson, The Beatles, Ron Howard, Brian Grazer, Charlie O. Finley

When They Was Fab: Electric Arguments About the Beatles
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Chuck Gunderson (Some Fun Tonight) joins the show over two weeks for a look at the Beatles tours of North America.     This week: 1964.       We briefly revisit Ron Howard's "Eight Days a Week", and the first US visit before the main attraction:  August-September 1964.      Unlike a modern tour, Brian scheduled 32 shows in 26 venues in 24 cities over just 33 days, with long plane rides the norm rather than the exception.

May 04 2020

47mins

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Introduction to Ron Howard

From First To Last Podcast
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FFTL returns and Season Five has arrived! In this weeks episode, Craig and Geoff discuss Ron Howard's journey to film making, his career as a director and the films he almost made. They discuss what they're most looking forward to about his filmography and so much more. 

Follow Us;

www.fftlpodcast.com
Insta: @fftlpodcast
FB: @fftlpodcast
Twitter: @fftlpodcast

Apr 20 2020

2hr

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Chasing Amy Minute 57: Ron Howard Voice “He Didn’t”

Jay and Silent Bob Minute
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Godzilla music, Jeff and Bob get in the writers room and punch up the script and can Holden go twenty minutes without saying something stupid

Special Guest Co-Host: Bob J. Koester from Immunites Podcast on Dueling Genre

http://www.duelinggenre.com/category/podcasts/original-series/immunities/

Apr 10 2020

23mins

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Willow (1988) | Ron Howard

Around the World in 80s Movies
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The story involves Willow Ufgood (Warwick Davis), a farmer who dreams of becoming a sorcerer's apprentice among the Nerwyns, which are a race of little people. One day, he encounters a baby who has washed onto the riverbank near his farm. The baby, who we come to learn is named Elora Danan, is a Daikini, a race much larger than the Nerwyns, but Willow's brethren don't think it's a good idea to keep her. The evil-witch Queen Bavmorda (Jean Marsh) has minions, including her warrior-princess daughter Sorsha (Joanne Whalley) and vicious skull-faced warrior General Kael (Pat Roach), actively searching for this baby smuggled out from under her nose because she may be the prophecy foretold to end her reign, a child with a special mark upon its arm. Willow accepts the mission to return the baby back to the first Daikini he meets, with a few other Nerwyns in tow.

Along the way, they encounter and recruit that first Daikini, Madmartigan (Val Kilmer), a skilled but down-on-his-luck mercenary, who agrees to take the baby for release from capture.  THe Daikinis are in the midst of a war with the legions on Bavmorda's side, putting Elora's fate in jeopardy should they fall short. However, Willow gets another directive from a fairy to find the good witch on a remote island. With Madmartigan and a couple of Brownies, who are from a human-like race even smaller than the Nerwyns, only nine inches in height, Willow seeks to find a way to protect the baby. Ron Howard directs this story by producer George Lucas.

Mar 06 2020

24mins

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Sundance 2020-Documentary: Ron Howard: Rebuilding Paradise; Michael Dweck & Gregory Kershaw: The Truffle Hunters; Ron Cicero & Kimo Easterwood: Happy Happy Joy Joy: The Ren & Stimpy Story

The Cinematography Podcast
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The Cinematography Podcast interviews the filmmakers for three documentaries at Sundance 2020. First up- Ron Howard, who talked about shooting his first documentary, Rebuilding Paradise. We present some selected soundbites of the conversation. Next, filmmakers Michael Dweck and Gregory Kershaw ventured deep in the forests near Alba, Italy for their documentary, The Truffle Hunters. The filmmakers chose to keep the camera on a tripod and to observe the subjects at a distance, except for special leather harness rigs for POV doggy-cams that Dweck and Kershaw had specially made. Finally, Happy Happy Joy Joy: The Ren & Stimpy Story is both a story that will please fans of the beloved cartoon Ren & Stimpy, but it's also a critical look at the cartoon's volatile creator, John Kricfalusi.

Find out even more about this episode, with extensive show notes and links: http://camnoir.com/sundance2020docs/

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Website: www.camnoir.com
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Feb 26 2020

1hr 17mins

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Collateral Cinema Holiday Special: Ron Howard's How the Grinch Stole Christmas (2000) w/ Special Guest Captain Nostalgia (Victims and Villains) (SPOILERS)

Collateral Cinema Movie Podcast
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Title: Dr. Seuss' How the Grinch Stole Christmas [Wikipedia] [IMDb]

Director: Ron Howard

Producers: Brian GrazerRon Howard

Writers: Jeffrey Price and Peter S. Seaman (screenplay), Dr. Seuss (book)

Stars: Jim CarreyJeffrey TamborChristine BaranskiBill IrwinMolly ShannonTaylor MomsenAnthony Hopkins (narrator)

Release date: November 17, 2000 (US)

SHOWNOTES: Happy Holidays, Collateral Cinema listeners! On this Christmas Day, we celebrate the season with a focus on Ron Howard's 2000 live action, feature film adaptation of Dr. Seuss' original children's book How the Grinch Stole Christmas! starring Jim Carrey in a memorable, if over-the-top performance as the titular Grinch! We discuss the value of this version of the story versus other adaptations; additions and modifications which flesh out Seuss' original story, whilst remaining true to the critique on modern commercialism, materialism, and consumerism; Ron Howard's direction in adapting this timeless holiday classic and overall cinematography; and, of course, Mr. Carrey's zany role in this film, which brought new life to the character. Collateral Cinema wishes you a merry/happy Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, Festivus, or whatever you're celebrating this season! And stay tuned for more content after the New Year!

Our special guest host for our Holiday Special is Captain Nostalgia from the Victims and Villains podcast (@VctmsAndVillans). You can find them on Apple Podcasts and wherever you get your podcasts!

Collateral Cinema is on Apple Podcasts, Chill Lover Radio, and wherever else you get your podcasts. Also, find us on Patreon; we have exclusive full-length commentaries on our favorite movies and plan more to come!

(Collateral Cinema is an LCompany Production. Intro song is a license-free beat. All music and movie clips are owned by their respective creators and are used for educational purposes only. Please don’t sue us; we’re poor!)

Dec 25 2019

1hr 25mins

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