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Sylvester Johnson

11 Podcast Episodes

Latest 17 Sep 2022 | Updated Daily

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Sylvester Johnson (Air Date: 09/14/2021)

Stacks on Stacks: The Interviews

Sylvester Johnson is the director of the Virginia Tech Center for Humanities. He is a nationally recognized humanities scholar specializing in the study of technology, race, religion, and national security.  He is also assistant vice provost for the humanities at Virginia Tech and executive director of the university’s Tech for Humanity initiative. Sylvester joined Joe in the studio to discuss Vox Humanities, his podcast focusing on the advancement of human centered knowledge. Vox Humanities is produced in affiliation with Virginia Tech Publishing and the Virginia Tech University Libraries Athenaeum. Stacks on Stacks: The Interviews is a collection of guest interviews that aired during the regular broadcast of the program on Tuesdays from 3:30 until 5pm, over 90.7 FM WUVT, Radio for Everyone. Season Two: The Hopeful Return is a collection of all the interview segments recorded for live broadcast during the Stacks on Stacks radio program in the Fall 2020.

20mins

14 Sep 2021

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Episode 13 | "Sylvester Johnson's Bucket!" | 4.11.2021

Cross Talk: The Kurtis & Paula Show!

Welcome to episode 13 of "The Kurtis & Paula Show!  Thanks for tuning in as this week, we discuss...•The Drip Tray Has Arrived!•Paula Gets Back In The Classroom•Accident Insurance•DJ CassidyBut wait... there's more!  We also have a fast food issue, a BUNCH of shout outs, a cameo appearance/call-in guest and a good bit more.Be sure to connect with us socially...FacebookInstagramTwitterEmail us with questions at kurtisandpaula@gmail.comOur website is www.kurtisandpaula.com.Hope you enjoy!

47mins

10 Apr 2021

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COVID-19 shorts No. 2. Prof. Sylvester Johnson talks about what he is seeing in the world of academia and AI, what innovations will come out of the crisis and what insights he has gained during this troubling time.

Appetite for Disruption: The Business and Regulation of FinTech

COVID-19 shorts No. 2.  Prof. Sylvester Johnson talks about what he is seeing in the world of academia and AI, what innovations will come out of the crisis and what insights he has gained during this troubling time.

17mins

15 Apr 2020

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Prof. Sylvester Johnson, Part 2: What does it mean to be human? “Big Humanities” to Match “Big Technologies.”

Appetite for Disruption: The Business and Regulation of FinTech

More with Professor Johnson of Virginia Tech. This time, we learn about his “big humanities” response to “big technologies.” Lots to consider, from brain-to-computer interfaces, to robotic morality, to democracy, to trust. We liked his ideas about the inclusiveness that is needed for human beings to think these things through to ensure that voices and experiences are not left out. Some big philosophical stuff that left Troy and Lee in deep thought. We aren’t sure what the future holds, but we are glad people like Sylvester are helping the world grapple with these foundational questions.

23mins

17 Jun 2019

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Prof. Sylvester Johnson, Part 1: What does it mean to be human? From Aristotle to AI.

Appetite for Disruption: The Business and Regulation of FinTech

With the help of Professor Johnson of Virginia Tech, we discuss what it means to be human in an age of accelerating technology, where computers and robots can think and maybe even feel. Professor Johnson explains several of the amazing technologies that exist today, both “outside” people and those being incorporated directly into people’s bodies, and how industry and government is pushing this forward. He really expanded our views on how to think about humanity and technology.

26mins

3 Jun 2019

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Sylvester Johnson, “African American Religions, 1500-2000: Colonialism, Democracy, and Freedom” (Cambridge UP, 2015)

New Books in African American Studies

When and where do African American religions begin? Sylvester Johnson, Associate Professor of African American Studies and Religious Studies at Northwestern University, disrupts the traditional temporal and geographical boundaries in the academic study of black religion in the Americas in his new book, African American Religions, 1500-2000: Colonialism, Democracy, and Freedom (Cambridge University Press, 2015). Johnson places the productive forces in African American religion at the intersection of empire and colonialism and within the constructs of notions of democratic freedom. His study requires this analytical reformulation in order to examine how Black religious history unfolds within changing social and political contexts over the longue duree. In our conversation we discussed Afro-European commercialism, European views on Indigenous African religious practices, Black Christianization, violent state regulation, nineteenth century political theologies, Black settler colonialism and the creation of Liberia, Garveyism, African American Muslims, anticolonial movements, the racialization of religion, FBI surveillance and repression of Black religious movements, the connection between the history of African American Religions and Muslims Americans after 9/11, and interdisciplinarity. Kristian Petersen is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Nebraska Omaha. His research and teaching interests include Theory and Methodology in the Study of Religion, Islamic Studies, Chinese Religions, Human Rights, and Media Studies. You can find out more about his work on his website, follow him on Twitter @BabaKristian, or email him at kjpetersen@unomaha.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

1hr 11mins

29 Dec 2016

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Sylvester Johnson, “African American Religions, 1500-2000: Colonialism, Democracy, and Freedom” (Cambridge UP, 2015)

New Books in Religion

When and where do African American religions begin? Sylvester Johnson, Associate Professor of African American Studies and Religious Studies at Northwestern University, disrupts the traditional temporal and geographical boundaries in the academic study of black religion in the Americas in his new book, African American Religions, 1500-2000: Colonialism, Democracy, and Freedom (Cambridge University Press, 2015). Johnson places the productive forces in African American religion at the intersection of empire and colonialism and within the constructs of notions of democratic freedom. His study requires this analytical reformulation in order to examine how Black religious history unfolds within changing social and political contexts over the longue duree. In our conversation we discussed Afro-European commercialism, European views on Indigenous African religious practices, Black Christianization, violent state regulation, nineteenth century political theologies, Black settler colonialism and the creation of Liberia, Garveyism, African American Muslims, anticolonial movements, the racialization of religion, FBI surveillance and repression of Black religious movements, the connection between the history of African American Religions and Muslims Americans after 9/11, and interdisciplinarity. Kristian Petersen is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Nebraska Omaha. His research and teaching interests include Theory and Methodology in the Study of Religion, Islamic Studies, Chinese Religions, Human Rights, and Media Studies. You can find out more about his work on his website, follow him on Twitter @BabaKristian, or email him at kjpetersen@unomaha.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/religion

4mins

29 Dec 2016

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Sylvester Johnson, “African American Religions, 1500-2000: Colonialism, Democracy, and Freedom” (Cambridge UP, 2015)

New Books in African Studies

When and where do African American religions begin? Sylvester Johnson, Associate Professor of African American Studies and Religious Studies at Northwestern University, disrupts the traditional temporal and geographical boundaries in the academic study of black religion in the Americas in his new book, African American Religions, 1500-2000: Colonialism, Democracy, and Freedom (Cambridge University Press, 2015). Johnson places the productive forces in African American religion at the intersection of empire and colonialism and within the constructs of notions of democratic freedom. His study requires this analytical reformulation in order to examine how Black religious history unfolds within changing social and political contexts over the longue duree. In our conversation we discussed Afro-European commercialism, European views on Indigenous African religious practices, Black Christianization, violent state regulation, nineteenth century political theologies, Black settler colonialism and the creation of Liberia, Garveyism, African American Muslims, anticolonial movements, the racialization of religion, FBI surveillance and repression of Black religious movements, the connection between the history of African American Religions and Muslims Americans after 9/11, and interdisciplinarity. Kristian Petersen is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Nebraska Omaha. His research and teaching interests include Theory and Methodology in the Study of Religion, Islamic Studies, Chinese Religions, Human Rights, and Media Studies. You can find out more about his work on his website, follow him on Twitter @BabaKristian, or email him at kjpetersen@unomaha.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-studies

1hr 11mins

29 Dec 2016

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Sylvester Johnson, “African American Religions, 1500-2000: Colonialism, Democracy, and Freedom” (Cambridge UP, 2015)

New Books in Christian Studies

When and where do African American religions begin? Sylvester Johnson, Associate Professor of African American Studies and Religious Studies at Northwestern University, disrupts the traditional temporal and geographical boundaries in the academic study of black religion in the Americas in his new book, African American Religions, 1500-2000: Colonialism, Democracy, and Freedom (Cambridge University Press, 2015). Johnson places the productive forces in African American religion at the intersection of empire and colonialism and within the constructs of notions of democratic freedom. His study requires this analytical reformulation in order to examine how Black religious history unfolds within changing social and political contexts over the longue duree. In our conversation we discussed Afro-European commercialism, European views on Indigenous African religious practices, Black Christianization, violent state regulation, nineteenth century political theologies, Black settler colonialism and the creation of Liberia, Garveyism, African American Muslims, anticolonial movements, the racialization of religion, FBI surveillance and repression of Black religious movements, the connection between the history of African American Religions and Muslims Americans after 9/11, and interdisciplinarity. Kristian Petersen is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Nebraska Omaha. His research and teaching interests include Theory and Methodology in the Study of Religion, Islamic Studies, Chinese Religions, Human Rights, and Media Studies. You can find out more about his work on his website, follow him on Twitter @BabaKristian, or email him at kjpetersen@unomaha.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/christian-studies

1hr 11mins

29 Dec 2016

Episode artwork

Sylvester Johnson, “African American Religions, 1500-2000: Colonialism, Democracy, and Freedom” (Cambridge UP, 2015)

New Books in American Studies

When and where do African American religions begin? Sylvester Johnson, Associate Professor of African American Studies and Religious Studies at Northwestern University, disrupts the traditional temporal and geographical boundaries in the academic study of black religion in the Americas in his new book, African American Religions, 1500-2000: Colonialism, Democracy, and Freedom (Cambridge University Press, 2015). Johnson places the productive forces in African American religion at the intersection of empire and colonialism and within the constructs of notions of democratic freedom. His study requires this analytical reformulation in order to examine how Black religious history unfolds within changing social and political contexts over the longue duree. In our conversation we discussed Afro-European commercialism, European views on Indigenous African religious practices, Black Christianization, violent state regulation, nineteenth century political theologies, Black settler colonialism and the creation of Liberia, Garveyism, African American Muslims, anticolonial movements, the racialization of religion, FBI surveillance and repression of Black religious movements, the connection between the history of African American Religions and Muslims Americans after 9/11, and interdisciplinarity. Kristian Petersen is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Nebraska Omaha. His research and teaching interests include Theory and Methodology in the Study of Religion, Islamic Studies, Chinese Religions, Human Rights, and Media Studies. You can find out more about his work on his website, follow him on Twitter @BabaKristian, or email him at kjpetersen@unomaha.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

1hr 11mins

29 Dec 2016

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