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Alan Levinovitz Podcasts

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20 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Alan Levinovitz. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Alan Levinovitz, often where they are interviewed.

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20 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Alan Levinovitz. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Alan Levinovitz, often where they are interviewed.

Updated daily with the latest episodes

Ep#50: Alan Levinovitz

Just Add Bourbon Podcast
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This week, we celebrate our 50th episode as we’re joined by none other than Alan Levinovitz, author of Natural: How Faith in Nature's Goodness Leads to Harmful Fads, Unjust Laws, and Flawed Science. He works at the intersection of philosophy, religion, and science, focusing especially on how narratives and metaphors shape belief. A few weeks ago, he sat down with Joe Rogan on ‘The Joe Rogan Experience’ for an epic three hour episode. Hope you guys enjoy this one and thank you for all the support. We are having a ball!

In the words of the greatest football coach in the land, Mark Stoops, "Were just getting started bro!"

Jimmy Don, J.D., & Brad

Jul 27 2020

45mins

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Mind Meld 212 | A Satirical Uroboros Folding Back In On Itself | Dr. Alan Levinovitz

THIRD EYE DROPS
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Crowd-sponsor the show and get rewards on Patreon!

Dr. Alan Levinovitz enters the mind meld!

Alan is an Associate Professor of Religion at James Madison University. He works at the intersection of philosophy, religion, and science, focusing especially on how narratives and metaphors shape belief.

In this one, we rap about the beauty of optimistic agnosticism, why it's possible to be a religious agnostic, natural mystical experiences, holy gratitude, and why calling things 'natural' can be hugely problematic. 

Jul 22 2020

1hr 16mins

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#1504 - Alan Levinovitz

The Joe Rogan Experience
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Dr. Alan Levinovitz is an author and Associate Professor of Religion at James Madison University. His latest book Natural: How Faith in Nature's Goodness Leads to Harmful Fads, Unjust Laws, and Flawed Science is available now: https://www.amazon.com/Natural-Natures-Goodness-Harmful-Science/dp/0807010871 Also look for his podcast SHIFT available at http://shiftpodcast.co/

Jul 08 2020

3hr 31mins

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#455 What is 'Natural,' Food, Life, and Religion - Alan Levinovitz

The Not Old - Better Show
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What is 'Natural,' Food, Life, and Religion - Alan Levinovitz

Art of Living Author Interview Series...

Welcome to The Not Old Better Show. I’m Paul Vogelzang, and this is episode #455.

As part of our Art Of Living author interview series, today’s show is fascinating.

We’ll be speaking with author, academic, and journalist Alan Levinovitz about his new book, ‘Natural: “How Faith in Nature’s Goodness Leads to Harmful Fads…”. Dr. Levinovitz will be reading a passage from his new book, too. I loved the book, and let me tell you a bit about this subject:

Debates about what can be called 'natural' might seem unnecessary today, or even quaint, but not so this one, especially because our guest Alan Levinovitz answers our questions about how this focus on ‘natural” drives more attention to COVID, religion, and the climate crisis

From ‘clean eating’ to the countryside to Goop, ‘natural’ is assumed to be good and is almost a new religion, Dr. Levinovitz tells us today.

Additionally, we’ll hear from Dr. Levinovitz, who is an assistant professor of religion at James Madison University and a freelance journalist about our collective enchantment contradictions with what is “Natural,” and with the concept of “natural,” and tells us that often what qualifies as Natural is not simply a nutritional issue, but a moral one.

“Natural” equates to “goodness,” according to Dr. Levinovitz, “Seeking out natural products is about health, yes, but holistic health,” he wrote. “Physical and spiritual, personal, and planetary. Nature becomes a secular stand-in for God, and the word ‘natural’ a synonym for ‘holy, and even religion.” Let’s hear from Dr. Alan Levinovitz, reading from his new book,

That of course is our guest today, author, academic, and journalist Alan Levinovitz reading from his new book, ‘Natural: “How Faith in Nature’s Goodness Leads to Harmful Fads…”

Please join me in welcoming to The Not Old Better Show, author, academic, and journalist Alan Levinovitz.

My thanks to the author, academic and journalist Alan Levinovitz, ‘Natural: “How Faith in Nature’s Goodness Leads to Harmful Fads…”And, my thanks to you, my wonderful Not Old Better Show audience. Please be safe, practice smart social distancing, be well, and remember, Let’s Talk About Better. The Not Old Better Show. Thanks, everybody. Please find out more at https://notold-better.com

Jun 12 2020

18mins

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#83 – Alan Levinovitz

The Primalosophy Podcast
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Alan Levinovitz is an Associate Professor of Religion at James Madison University, where he specializes in classical Chinese thought and the intersection of religion and science. His latest book is Natural: How Faith in Nature's Goodness Leads to Harmful Fads, Unjust Laws, and Flawed Science, forthcoming on April 7 from Beacon Press.


Connect with Alan Levinovitz:

https://www.alanlevinovitz.com/

Twitter: @alanlevinovitz

Get the book:  Natural: How Faith in Nature's Goodness Leads to Harmful Fads, Unjust Laws, and Flawed Science


Connect with Nick Holderbaum:

Personal Health Coaching: https://www.primalosophy.com/

Nick Holderbaum’s Weekly Newsletter: Sunday Goods

(T): @primalosophy

(IG): @primalosophy

iTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-primalosophy-podcast/id1462578947

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBn7jiHxx2jzXydzDqrJT2A

The Unfucked Firefighter Challenge

May 25 2020

56mins

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64. Natural Doesn't Always Mean "Good" | Alan Levinovitz

Ketogeek's Podcast
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In food, health, nutrition and many domains of life, humans rely on "nature" or "natural" as the default and sometimes the best option. In this podcast, we talk about when it's ok to defer to nature and when it is time to move away from it.

BIO

Alan Levinovitz is an Associate Professor of Religion at James Madison University, where he specializes in classical Chinese thought and the intersection of religion and science. His latest book is Natural: How Faith in Nature's Goodness Leads to Harmful Fads, Unjust Laws, and Flawed Science, forthcoming on April 7 from Beacon Press

TIME STAMPS

0:15 – Update on Energy Pod, Ketogeek Membership Updates & Future Guest

7:07 – How did you end up becoming a successful writer?

8:01 – What is your viewpoint on “nature” and “natural”?

11:02 – When should you rely on nature and when should you move away from it?

14:14 – Why do people think natural is better?

16:15 – Does religion play a role in our preference for nature?

18:00 – Subjective human experience versus objective quantification?

20:01 – What can people expect from the new book “Natural: How Faith in Nature's Goodness Leads to Harmful Fads, Unjust Laws, and Flawed Science”?

22:20 – What questions did you start with before writing this book and what questions would you like answered?

25:02 – Do human beings have the collective capacity to think in nuance?

28:00 – What checkmarks do you use to find someone worth following and learning from?

30:02 – Final Plugs

GUEST LINKS:

KETOGEEK LINKS:

Mar 23 2020

33mins

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IMTalk Episode 700 - Alan Levinovitz (author of The Gluten Lie)

IMTalk
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In the second of our holiday season shows we have an interview with Alan Levinovitz. Alan is the author of The Gluten Lie. You can get his book here.

Jan 06 2020

52mins

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#12: Diet and Wellness Plans are the New Religion with Alan Levinovitz, Ph.D.

It's Just a Cookie
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Today I’m talking with Alan Levinovitz, Ph.D., about the surprising connection between current wellness and dieting trends and religion. Alan is an associate professor of religious studies at James Madison University, where he specializes in Chinese philosophy and the intersection of religion and science. His first book, The Gluten Lie, explores modern food fears as religious taboos. He is currently working on another book, Natural, that explains how we turn nature into God.

Alan talks about how religion offers a way to deal with suffering: why it happens, how to avoid it and how to fix it. He compares this narrative to the prevailing narrative that infuses diet and wellness culture which promises to heal all manner of physical and emotional suffering.

Show Highlights:

  • Halo Top ice cream implies that there is something holy about not consuming calories which is tied up with denial of the body, a deeply religious theme
  • The new secular saints are diet, wellness, and fitness gurus
  • The sphere of religion’s authority is shrinking so we look to other authoritative sources like science to tell us how to avoid suffering
  • People really want food to make them holy and pure although today we use the language of “optimizing” oneself
  • The word holistic has been corrupted by health gurus 
  • Most lifestyle changes that claim to be holistic are not holistic at all as they are only about the body
  • No one knows why we suffer and die
  • Some kind of narrative helps explain the randomness of suffering and death
  • It’s not just that you should moderate sugar, according to current diet and wellness trends, but eliminate all sugar, which echos religious and purity taboos
  • Dietary taboos can be a way to both distance ourselves from certain communities and to form new communities 
  • It’s a really powerful thing to feel like you know something that other people don’t
  • People need narratives and metaphorical shorthands to deal with everyday life
  • Be wary whenever someone promises you a hidden, secret solution that no one else knows about
  • Treating the scale like an oracle - you step on the scale and it tells you how good you are
  • Ancient Taoist texts promised that if you followed a particular diet, you would have clear skin, you would live forever and you would be able to teleport, which is not much different from the promises that current day diet and wellness culture make (without the teleporting!)

Links & Resources:

Nov 20 2019

46mins

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The Meaning of Natural with Alan Levinovitz

InnerFirePodcast
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Alan Levinovitz is an Associate Professor of Religion at James Madison University and the author of The Gluten Lie: And Other Myths About What We Eat. He joins us to chat about how rituals impact our lives and his upcoming book about the meaning of "Natural", which will be published in the Spring of 2020. 

Give him a follow on Twitter: @AlanLevinovitz

And give his previous book a read: The Gluten Lie (2015)

Sep 02 2019

37mins

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Eating in the 4th Dimension: Interview with Alan Levinovitz

Noncompliant - the podcast
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cw: eating disorders

Podcast
Listen to the episode here at the audio link below (Link to Stitcher and iTunes at the end of this post).

https://noncompliantpodcast.files.wordpress.com/2019/06/01-allen-mix.mp3

Bio
Professor Alan Levinovitz is an associate professor of religious studies at James Madison University. He specializes in classical Chinese philosophy and the relationship between religion and science. In addition to scholarly articles, he is the author of The Gluten Lie: And Other Myths about What You Eat –and The Limits of Religious Tolerance. He has also appeared on the Netflix series A User’s Guide to Cheating Death. His next book is about how nature gets treated like God.

Pseudoscience in Autism Parent Culture
When Bax was 5, we were at a playgroup with some other autistic kids. The kids were running around when suddenly one little girl stopped, bent over and threw up into the bushes.

Sorry we left early! her mom texted me later, Sienna’s on a new dose of B12 that’s been bothering her tummy.

I didn’t exactly want to ask, but I did: Why? Sienna’s mom explained that she and her husband inject Sienna with B12 vitamins in their kitchen every morning before school (per their naturopath’s instructions) to prevent “autistic methylation”. They also give Sienna six herbal supplements to swallow each morning and have her on restrictive diet (no sugar, no wheat, no dairy) – all supposedly to “detoxify” her brain and cure her autism.

Aside from the disturbing nature of the rituals themselves–all based in pseudoscience–there was something else that upset me on a very deep level. It was the way that Sienna’s mom talked about these treatments as though they were the most ordinary thing in the world, like giving a child a Flintstones vitamin. Making a child endure daily injections and fake pills to cure an imagined disease is aberrant behaviour, yet it is normalized within the autism parent community and the broader culture –and even shared on some mainstream autism “advocacy” websites.

Too often, when parents talk about these phony cures, everyone just quietly defers to the parents or may even question themselves, thinking “well, maybe I don’t really understand autism…” Even worse, bystanders may assume that it’s okay to do things to an autistic child that they would never accept doing to a neurotypical child, just because the child is disabled.

But it’s not okay. These phony treatments  come at a high cost that includes physical risks and emotional harm. I started the Campaign Against Phony Autism Cures in 2018 to try to combat some of this, building off the tradition of other activist mothers such as Melissa Eaton, Amanda Seigler, Fiona O’Leary, Emma Dalmayne and Shannon Des Roches Rosa, (some of whom I interview in upcoming episodes). We have the support of the broader #actuallyautistic community, as well as allies across a range of disciplines, such as Alan.

While we need to fight for regulation and enforcement to protect children today, we also need to educate for tomorrow–to change the very mindset that leads parents to choose autism pseudoscience. One powerful step is to challenge the myth of autism as a disease (it is not, according to the APA, the DSM and other scientific bodies) and to understand it instead as a disability to accommodate and–most importantly–to accept. It is through this acceptance, which we all want, that children and parents can connect and stay connected. Without autism acceptance, we will just continue to have the chaos and pseudoscience we see today.

The episode
Alan and I discussed how the desire for empowering rituals around food can be twisted by marketers to sell a product or a plan, such as the GAPS, DAN or MAPS diets. We also talked about the negative impact of restrictive diets on individuals; the problem with proxy consent; the idea of battle in the language around autism parenting; the inaccessibility of medical jargon; the need for #actuallyautistic voices in autism organizations– and so much more. Alan also discussed food restrictions within traditional explanatory framework/context of world religions and talked about the commodification of rituals: incredibly interesting!

As Alan said: “We need to reframe the whole narrative of how we understand autism and need to make sure there are more and different resources in place for parents. …A part of the solution to these problems will be changing the context in which parents and children are receiving autism diagnoses and changing the framing narrative that people use to understand those diagnoses. If we can do that we would really go a long way towards improving things for everyone.”

I really loved this podcast too because it has an uplifting ending, something I needed to hear that day. Thank you, Alan!

Useful links
Interview with Alan Levinovitz

The Gluten Lie

Listen to this episode on Stitcher here
Listen to this episode on iTunes here

Jun 24 2019

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