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Demis Hassabis

9 Podcast Episodes

Latest 28 Aug 2021 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

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In conversation with DeepMind’s Demis Hassabis

Foresight with Greg Williams

Demis Hassabis, CEO and co-founder of DeepMind, joins Greg Williams to discuss how AI can impact scientific research, building multidisciplinary teams – and how to combat algorithmic bias Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

23mins

5 Mar 2021

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Demis Hassabis

Discovery

Jim Al-Khalili finds out why Demis Hassabis wants to create artificial intelligence and use it to help humanity.Thinking about how to win at chess when he was a boy got Demis thinking about the process of thinking itself. Being able to program his first computer (a Sinclair Spectrum) felt miraculous. In computer chess, his two passions were combined. And a lifelong ambition to create artificial intelligence was born.Demis studied computer science at Cambridge and then worked in the computer games industry for many years. Games, he says, are the ideal testing ground for AI. Then, thinking memory and imagination were aspects of the human mind that would be a necessary part of any artificially intelligent system, he studied neuroscience for a PhD.He set up DeepMind in 2010 and pioneered a new approach to creating artificial intelligence, based on deep learning and built-in rewards for making good decisions. Four years later, DeepMind was sold to Google for £400 million. The company’s landmark creation, Alpha Go stunned the world when it defeated the world Go champion in South Korea in 2016. Their AI system, AlphaZero taught itself to play chess from scratch. After playing against itself for just four hours, it was the best chess computer in the world. (Humans had been defeated long ago).Many fear both the supreme intelligence and the stupidity of AI. Demis imagines a future in which computers and humans put their brains together to try and understand the world. His algorithms have inspired humans to raise their game, when playing Go and chess. Now, he hopes that AI might do the same for scientific research. Perhaps the next Nobel Prize will be shared between a human and AI?

26mins

10 Mar 2020

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Demis Hassabis on artificial intelligence

The Life Scientific

In the 200th episode of The Life Scientific, Jim Al-Khalili finds out why Demis Hassabis wants to create artificial intelligence and use it to help humanity.Thinking about how to win at chess when he was a boy got Demis thinking about the process of thinking itself. Being able to program his first computer (a Sinclair Spectrum) felt miraculous. In computer chess, his two passions were combined. And a lifelong ambition to create artificial intelligence was born. Demis studied computer science at Cambridge and then worked in the computer games industry for many years. Games, he says, are the ideal testing ground for AI. Then, thinking memory and imagination were aspects of the human mind that would be a necessary part of any artificially intelligent system, he studied neuroscience for a PhD. He set up DeepMind in 2010 and pioneered a new approach to creating artificial intelligence, based on deep learning and built-in rewards for making good decisions. Four years later, DeepMind was sold to Google for £400 million. The company’s landmark creation, Alpha Go stunned the world when it defeated the world Go champion in South Korea in 2016. Their AI system, AlphaZero taught itself to play chess from scratch. After playing against itself for just four hours, it was the best chess computer in the world. (Humans had been defeated long ago). Many fear both the supreme intelligence and the stupidity of AI. Demis imagines a future in which computers and humans put their brains together to try and understand the world. His algorithms have inspired humans to raise their game, when playing Go and chess. Now, he hopes that AI might do the same for scientific research. Perhaps the next Nobel Prize will be shared between a human and AI? Producer: Anna Buckley

32mins

5 Nov 2019

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Demis Hassabis: The interview

DeepMind: The Podcast

In this special extended episode, Hannah Fry meets Demis Hassabis, the CEO and co-founder of DeepMind. She digs into his former life as a chess player, games designer and neuroscientist and explores how his love of chess helped him to get start-up funding, what drives him and his vision, and why AI keeps him up at night.If you have a question or feedback on the series, message us on Twitter (@DeepMind using the hashtag #DMpodcast) or email us at podcast@deepmind.com.Further reading:Wired: Inside DeepMind's epic mission to solve science's trickiest problemQuanta magazine: How Artificial Intelligence Is Changing ScienceDemis Hassabis: A systems neuroscience approach to building AGI. Talk at the 2010 Singularity Summit Demis Hassabis: The power of self-learning systems. Talk at MIT 2019Demis Hassabis: Talk on Creativity and AI Financial Times: The mind in the machine: Demis Hassabis on artificial intelligence (2017)The Times: Interview with Demis HassabisThe Economist Babbage podcast: DeepMind GamesInterview with Demis Hassabis from the book Game Changer, which also features an introduction from DemisInterviewees: Deepmind CEO and co-founder, Demis HassabisCredits:Presenter: Hannah FryEditor: David PrestSenior Producer: Louisa FieldProducers: Amy Racs, Dan HardoonBinaural Sound: Lucinda Mason-BrownMusic composition: Eleni Shaw (with help from Sander Dieleman and WaveNet)Commissioned by DeepMind

36mins

17 Sep 2019

Most Popular

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DeepMind’s Demis Hassabis

The Disrupters

Rohan and Kamal talk to artificial intelligence expert, neuroscientist and entrepreneur Demis Hassabis. A former chess child prodigy, Demis is chief executive of DeepMind, the artificial intelligence business bought by Google for £400m only three years after it had started. But previously Demis had another company, which had failed. In this podcast he talks about lessons learnt from that experience; the dangers of being over idealistic, burn out and knowing when to cut your losses.

29mins

5 Nov 2018

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Demis Hassabis: A.I. Mastermind

What It Takes

Artificial Intelligence is already changing the course of society, and it’s only in its infancy. Hear one of the most innovative and successful thinkers in the field describe the coming revolutions A.I. is bringing about in medicine and in environmental science. Demis Hassabis, a neuroscientist and former game developer, describes how his company, Deep Mind, is developing technologies that can extend the power of the human brain, in order to solve some of the biggest problems facing mankind. Along the way, he hopes to unlock some of the mysteries of the universe. This episode also includes excerpts of earlier pioneers in the field of Artificial Intelligence: Marvin Minsky and Ray Kurzweil.

49mins

23 Apr 2018

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Demis Hassabis

Desert Island Discs

Kirsty Young's castaway is Dr Demis Hassabis. An artificial intelligence researcher and co-founder and CEO of DeepMind, he is also a neuroscientist, a computer games designer, an entrepreneur, and in his youth, a world-class chess player.Born in 1976, he was introduced to chess aged four and, by the age of twelve, was the world's second-highest ranked player for his age. With his winnings, he bought himself a PC and taught himself to code. After taking his A Levels two years early, before going to university he worked on one of the most successful computer games of the 1990s, Theme Park. He graduated from Cambridge with a double first, and returned to the computer games industry, founding his own company in his early twenties.His passion had long been artificial intelligence and he says everything he's done has been part of a long-term plan to "solve intelligence" and then use intelligence "to solve everything else". He gained a PhD in Cognitive Neuroscience where he deliberately chose to study topics where AI had failed so far: memory and imagination. After stints at MIT and Harvard, he co-founded his company in 2010, which was then acquired by Google in January 2014. In March 2016 their computer programme, AlphaGo, beat a world champion Go player at the game having taught itself how to play through a combination of two techniques - deep learning and reinforcement learning. Producer: Cathy Drysdale.

36mins

21 May 2017

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Campylobacter in Chicken; Artificial Intelligence Guru Demis Hassabis; Sexology; Lucy

BBC Inside Science

Food Standards Agency report reveals 70% of supermarket chicken contaminated. Chicken: It's the nation's favourite meat. But today, a report released by the Food Standards Agency has revealed that around three quarters of that chicken is infected by campylobacter - a family of bacteria, 12 species of which are known to cause food poisoning. The estimated cost to the UK economy is £900 million per year. All supermarkets are implicated and all supply chains too. It doesn't cause outbreaks and thorough cooking kills all the bugs. Professor Hugh Pennington tells Dr Adam Rutherford why campylobacter is such a tough bug to crack. Can machines think?Neuroscientist, chess master and world-champion gamer, Demis Hassabis is this week's winner of the Royal Society's Mullard Award. In 2011, he founded an AI company, Deep Mind which was acquired by Google earlier this year for £400million.He tells Adam why he believes one of the best tests for artificial intelligence is an ability to learn how to play computer games. Why scientists study sexSex between humans has long been something of a taboo for scientists. But the Institute of Sexology is tackling it head-on. It's a new exhibition at London's Wellcome Collection, a frank exploration of sex and the scientists who've studied it for the past century or so. Tracey Logan went to preview the display, and asked: Why do scientists study sex? Australopithecus discovery 40 years on 23rd November 2014 was a significant 40th birthday. Or, to be a bit more precise, it was a 3 million, 200 thousand and 40th birthday. On that day in 1974, Donald Johanson and his team in Ethiopia discovered the fossilised remains of AL 288-1, who became universally known as Lucy. Don talks to Adam Rutherford about the young woman who changed his life.Producer: Anna Buckley & Fiona RobertsAssistant Producer: Jen Whyntie.

27mins

27 Nov 2014

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Demis Hassabis

Across the Board

Across The Board: a series of interviews conducted by Dominic Lawson over a game of chess. In this, the last of the series, Dominic takes on Demis Hassabis. Demis was a child chess prodigy, who moved into computer programming, and has just sold his company to Google for £400million.

12mins

31 Oct 2014