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Jonathan Barnett

10 Podcast Episodes

Latest 1 May 2021 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

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Jonathan Barnett | The reality of the transfer window and Gareth Bale’s future

Football CFB: Unique Football Content

The world’s most powerful sports agent Jonathan Barnett joins Callum to discuss FIFA’s proposed agents reforms, day to day life as a ‘super agent’ and reveals what the future holds for Gareth Bale.

23mins

17 Sep 2020

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Ecodesign for Cities & Suburbs (Part II) - Larry Beasley & Jonathan Barnett

Livable City

Part II of the conversation with Larry Beasley and Jonathan Barnett. Why do we even live in cities? There's been a lot of criticism about them during the pandemic which makes this the perfect time to reflect on this very question. Larry and Jonathan discuss this and much more in this second half of the conversation, the first half from two weeks ago. My two guests today for the part of this series did not have the luxury of doing this in theory. Larry Beasley, former Co-Director of Planning for Vancouver, BC helped bring about a Vancouver that began as a fairly unremarkable place compared to other cities but with a stunning natural backdrop, into a world-leading city consistently ranked in the top 10 most livable cities coexisting with the stunning wilderness that surrounds it. Jonathan Barnett is the emeritus Professor of Practice in City and Regional Planning at the University of Pennsylvania with a heavy focus on practice while being both a professor and advisor to an impressive list of cities on many important livability-enhancing projects. Both men share a mountain (pun intended!) of wisdom and experience as well as a lot of great stories from their rich and accomplished careers. And they’re not done yet; both have been busy as individuals and co-authors of several significant books including: Ecodesign for Cities and Suburbs, Designing the Megaregion and Vancouverism among many others. These books are highly practical and interesting to think deeply about as you think about your own cities and how things could become more livable and how to get there. Both are also co-creators of an online course also by the name of Ecodesign for Cities and Suburbs that can be taken by anyone interested in how “ecology can guide urban design to avert environmental disasters and improve people’s lives.” You won’t want to miss the chance to take this course if you’re wondering how properly designed cities really can be a significant part of curbing global climate changes. Brought to you by SquadCast and post-production by Creekmore Music.

53mins

4 Aug 2020

Similar People

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Ecodesign for Cities & Suburbs (Part I) - Larry Beasley & Jonathan Barnett

Livable City

If you were in a position to lead a plan to make your city more livable, how would you do it, what would you do? How would you go about instilling your vision for greater livability but in close collaboration with your fellow city residents, how would you do that? My two guests today for part one of a two part series did not have the luxury of doing this in theory. Larry Beasley, former Co-Director of Planning for Vancouver, BC helped bring about a Vancouver that began as a fairly unremarkable place compared to other cities but with a stunning natural backdrop, into a world-leading city consistently ranked in the top 10 most livable cities coexisting with the stunning wilderness that surrounds it. Jonathan Barnett is the emeritus Professor of Practice in City and Regional Planning at the University of Pennsylvania with a heavy focus on practice while being both a professor and advisor to an impressive list of cities on many important livability-enhancing projects. Both men share a mountain (pun intended!) of wisdom and experience as well as a lot of great stories from their rich and accomplished careers. And they’re not done yet; both have been busy as individuals and co-authors of several significant books including: Ecodesign for Cities and Suburbs, Designing the Megaregion and Vancouverism among many others. These books are highly practical and interesting to think deeply about as you think about your own cities and how things could become more livable and how to get there. Both are also co-creators of an online course also by the name of Ecodesign for Cities and Suburbs that can be taken by anyone interested in how “ecology can guide urban design to avert environmental disasters and improve people’s lives.” You won’t want to miss the chance to take this course if you’re wondering how properly designed cities really can be a significant part of curbing global climate changes. Don’t miss this episode as well as Part II in 2 weeks. Brought to you by SquadCast and post-production by Creekmore Music.

56mins

22 Jul 2020

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Jonathan Barnett, "Designing the Megaregion: Meeting Urban Challenges at a New Scale" (Island Press, 2020)

New Books in Architecture

The US population is estimated to grow by more than 110 million people by 2050, and much of this growth will take place where cities and their suburbs are expanding to meet the suburbs of neighboring cities, creating continuous urban megaregions. There are now at least a dozen megaregions in the US. If current trends continue unchanged, new construction in these megaregions will put more and more stress on the natural systems that are necessary for our existence, will make highway gridlock and airline delays much worse, and will continue to attract investment away from older areas. However, the megaregion in 2050 is still a prediction. Future economic and population growth could go only to environmentally safe locations. while helping repair landscapes damaged by earlier development. Improved transportation systems could reduce highway and airport congestion. Some new investment could be drawn to by-passed parts of older cities, which are becoming more separate and unequal.In Designing the Megaregion: Meeting Urban Challenges at a New Scale (Island Press, 2020), planning and urban design expert Jonathan Barnett describes how to redesign megaregional growth using mostly private investment, without having to wait for massive government funding or new governmental structures. Barnett explains practical initiatives to make new development fit into its environmental setting, especially important as the climate changes; reorganize transportation systems to pull together all the components of these large urban regions; and redirect the market forces which are making megaregions very unequal places.There is an urgent need to begin designing megaregions, and Barnett shows that the ways to make major improvements are already available.Jonathan Barnett is an Emeritus Professor of Practice in City and Regional Planning, and former Director of the Urban Design Program, at the University of Pennsylvania. He is an architect and planner as an educator. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/architecture

1hr 3mins

8 Apr 2020

Most Popular

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Jonathan Barnett, "Designing the Megaregion: Meeting Urban Challenges at a New Scale" (Island Press, 2020)

New Books in American Studies

The US population is estimated to grow by more than 110 million people by 2050, and much of this growth will take place where cities and their suburbs are expanding to meet the suburbs of neighboring cities, creating continuous urban megaregions. There are now at least a dozen megaregions in the US. If current trends continue unchanged, new construction in these megaregions will put more and more stress on the natural systems that are necessary for our existence, will make highway gridlock and airline delays much worse, and will continue to attract investment away from older areas. However, the megaregion in 2050 is still a prediction. Future economic and population growth could go only to environmentally safe locations. while helping repair landscapes damaged by earlier development. Improved transportation systems could reduce highway and airport congestion. Some new investment could be drawn to by-passed parts of older cities, which are becoming more separate and unequal.In Designing the Megaregion: Meeting Urban Challenges at a New Scale (Island Press, 2020), planning and urban design expert Jonathan Barnett describes how to redesign megaregional growth using mostly private investment, without having to wait for massive government funding or new governmental structures. Barnett explains practical initiatives to make new development fit into its environmental setting, especially important as the climate changes; reorganize transportation systems to pull together all the components of these large urban regions; and redirect the market forces which are making megaregions very unequal places.There is an urgent need to begin designing megaregions, and Barnett shows that the ways to make major improvements are already available.Jonathan Barnett is an Emeritus Professor of Practice in City and Regional Planning, and former Director of the Urban Design Program, at the University of Pennsylvania. He is an architect and planner as an educator. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

1hr 3mins

8 Apr 2020

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Jonathan Barnett, "Designing the Megaregion: Meeting Urban Challenges at a New Scale" (Island Press, 2020)

New Books in Public Policy

The US population is estimated to grow by more than 110 million people by 2050, and much of this growth will take place where cities and their suburbs are expanding to meet the suburbs of neighboring cities, creating continuous urban megaregions. There are now at least a dozen megaregions in the US. If current trends continue unchanged, new construction in these megaregions will put more and more stress on the natural systems that are necessary for our existence, will make highway gridlock and airline delays much worse, and will continue to attract investment away from older areas. However, the megaregion in 2050 is still a prediction. Future economic and population growth could go only to environmentally safe locations. while helping repair landscapes damaged by earlier development. Improved transportation systems could reduce highway and airport congestion. Some new investment could be drawn to by-passed parts of older cities, which are becoming more separate and unequal.In Designing the Megaregion: Meeting Urban Challenges at a New Scale (Island Press, 2020), planning and urban design expert Jonathan Barnett describes how to redesign megaregional growth using mostly private investment, without having to wait for massive government funding or new governmental structures. Barnett explains practical initiatives to make new development fit into its environmental setting, especially important as the climate changes; reorganize transportation systems to pull together all the components of these large urban regions; and redirect the market forces which are making megaregions very unequal places.There is an urgent need to begin designing megaregions, and Barnett shows that the ways to make major improvements are already available.Jonathan Barnett is an Emeritus Professor of Practice in City and Regional Planning, and former Director of the Urban Design Program, at the University of Pennsylvania. He is an architect and planner as an educator. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/public-policy

1hr 3mins

8 Apr 2020

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Oxi-Fresh Founder, CEO Jonathan Barnett: Cleaning Up in Carpet Care

Franchise Today

Jonathan Barnett is Founder, President and CEO of Oxi Fresh Carpet Cleaning, one of the fastest growing cleaning franchises in North America, with over 300 locations throughout the U.S. and Canada. Their Mission is to be an environmentally friendly, green carpet cleaning company, who’s #1 goal is to provide their customers with the highest quality carpet cleaning experience in the industry and accomplish this with excellent service and support throughout all levels of the company. Listen, as he explains how he is accomplishing this, with both consumers and his franchisees.

51mins

7 Aug 2019

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Jonathan Barnett Shares The Oxi Fresh Story (How to Nail It Then Scale It)

Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

151,000 + objective Google Reviews, 396 locations...1 OXI Fresh franchise. The founder of Oxi Fresh, Jonathan Barnett shares how he and his team were able to nail and scale the OXI Fresh carpet cleaning franchise.

56mins

1 Mar 2019

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889: Being Encouraged by No’s- Sometimes it May Take 99 No’s to Get 1 Yes with Jonathan Barnett Founder and Owner of Oxi Fresh Franchising Co, Inc

The Entrepreneur Way

Jonathan Barnett created Oxi Fresh Carpet Cleaning in 2006, and within six months of operating he went from having a single location in Denver to growing in five states with 17 total locations. Now, 12 years later Oxi Fresh has grown to over 300 locations in the U.S. and Canada. “Follow your passions, work super hard and don’t let, every time someone tells you no, don’t take that as a negative, take that as one more no out the way until I get my yes. One no closer to my yes. Don’t be discouraged by the no’s, be encouraged, sometimes it may take your 99 no’s to get one yes”…[Listen for More] Click Here for Show Notes To Listen or to Get the Show Notes go to https://wp.me/p6Tf4b-6op

1hr 5mins

9 Jul 2018

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Spiritual Path - Jonathan Barnett Ep.0074

The Spiritual Voice

I’ve explored the role of spiritual integration in a conversation with Jonathan Barnett (www.barnettinteriors.com) about his spiritual path. In his early years he had an experience of having his 3rd eye opened which made it difficult to function and relate with the physical world. There is a challenge with several spiritual experiences, which is how do you integrate it so that it is meaningful in your life? Our expert helps us answer this question by providing insights into the breath, sound as well as interactions in your everyday life. Eventually Jonathan had stopped meditating because he felt he didn’t fit in the world of materialism, religion and everything else. He then focused on everything that was important in the external world. In the 80s once several people started passing away from AIDS he re-immersed himself in spiritual work. This brought him to practice Transcendental Meditation (TM) which uses a mantra. The effects were that he became more integrated in his life which was different than his early childhood experiences. TM allowed him to feel safe in his body as well as return his soul fully into it. There is one thing that connects the spirit to the body, which is breath. The breath is connected to the soul and when the breath leaves the body the soul leaves with it. Listen to the show to have a better understanding of your spiritual journey and gain a clearer understanding on how you can better reconcile spirituality with your profession and the material world. Contact Jonathan’s website: www.barnettinteriors.com Get support for spiritual leaders: http://thespiritualvoice.com/about/ Talk with Us: http://thespiritualvoice.com/talk-with-us-tsv/ To learn more about The Spiritual Voice (TSV) and TSV Alliances with resources for seekers and spiritual leaders visit www.thespiritualvoice.com . You will also find all the show notes, the free podcast level up upgrades delivered weekly, and our guest’s contact information. Music Attribution 'Havens Above' theme music taken from 'Aural Architecture' by alucidnation. www.alucidnation.co.uk / www.fabermusic.com / www.interchill.com . If you're interested in buying CDs and/or digital then you could use the 'gift' facility via BandCamp:http://alucidnation.bandcamp.com/album/aural-architecture .

30mins

1 Sep 2016