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Weijian Shan

15 Podcast Episodes

Latest 18 Sep 2021 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

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Weijian Shan - The Man from Gobi Desert: Stories of Survival, Deals, Breaking Barriers and Building Trust

unSILOed with Greg LaBlanc

Hard work and luck. That's the key to success, according to Weijian Shan. And he knows a thing or two about success. Shan is the founder and head of Hong Kong-based private equity group PAG, a former professor at the Wharton School, and the lead on one of the most successful buyout deals ever: the acquisition and turnaround of what used to be Korea's largest bank.That is the focus of his latest book, Money Games, where he gets deep into the details of closing that deal.Join us as he and Greg talk about the history of the banking system in Korea, the importance of real-world experience in academia, the current state of China banking, and how spending years doing forced labor in the Gobi Desert prepped Shan for the life he has now.Episode Quotes:What lessons did you learn from your years of suffering in the Gobi Desert that helped you succeed later in life?Once you have experienced the hardship, you appreciate whatever you have […] I think that you also learn that nothing can be tougher. And therefore, even though the negotiation process, as I described in the book, 一 was tough, and there were many setbacks, there were many frustrations. You learn to be patient. You learn to persevere. You learn never to give up.How did you build relationships and overcome hesitations when you come in and invest in these Asian companies?In a country where information is not instantly available and you don't know enough about your counterparties, of course, relationships would help you navigate the marketplace. You do business with people who you know. But, when you deal with the government, it's not so much of the relationship that mattered at the time. It was a trust that you needed to build. Of course, the Koreans were very skeptical of foreign investors who came in during the financial crisis, and they were very much afraid, justifiably so. Then the foreign ambassadors would take advantage of the situation and get too good a deal from the government. So, they were very careful when negotiating with us. And that was why it took so long; there was so much back and forth between the two parties.What role does humility and listening to others play during negotiations?When you become arrogant, then inevitably, you will fall. It is crucial to be able to listen to different opinions and different views. And to be humble. To understand it's not just you. There's luck, and there are other points of view. So, I think that's very important. If you're not able to accept different perspectives, then it's very easy to fail.Show LinksGuest ProfileWeijian Shan’s Profile at PAGWeijian’s Profile at WhartonWeijian’s Profile at BloombergHis WorkSouth China Morning Post ArticlesPAG’s Official WebsiteMoney Games: The Inside Story of How American Dealmakers Saved Korea's Most Iconic BankOut of the Gobi: My Story of China and America

53mins

4 Aug 2021

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Weijian Shan, Group Chairman and CEO of PAG

Talks at GS

In this episode of Talks at GS Presents: Insights from Great Investors, PAG CEO Weijian Shan discusses his investment focus in Asia, how the evolving US-China relationship impacts his investment approach, and what he has learned from key investments throughout his career. The interview is moderated by Alison Mass, chairman of Goldman Sachs' Investment Banking Division.This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part, or disclosed by any recipient to any other person. The information contained in this podcast does not constitute a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the recipient. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, express or implied, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefore (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any recipient is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that recipient, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity.Copyright 2021 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.

10mins

14 Jan 2021

Similar People

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Weijian Shan, "Money Games: The Inside Story of How American Dealmakers Saved Korea's Most Iconic Bank" (John Wiley, 2020)

New Books Network

Money Games: The Inside Story of How American Dealmakers Saved Korea’s Most Iconic Bank (Wiley, 2020) by Weijian Shan’s, is a riveting tale of one of the most successful buyout deals ever: the acquisition and turnaround of what used to be Korea’s largest bank by the American firm Newbridge Capital. Full of intrigue and suspense, this insider's account is told by the chief architect of the deal itself, the celebrated author and private equity investor Weijian Shan. With billions of dollars at stake, and the nation's economic future on the line, Newbridge Capital sought to become the first foreign firm in history to take control of one of Korea’s most beloved financial institutions. In a proud country still reeling from a humiliating International Monetary Fund bailout in the Asian Financial Crisis, Newbridge Capital had to muster every ounce of skill, determination, and patience to bring the deal to closing. Shan takes readers inside the battle to win control of the bank—a delicate, often exasperating process that meant balancing the goals of Newbridge with those of the government, bank employees, and Korea's powerful industrial titans. The author describes how Newbridge transformed and rebuilt the struggling bank into a shining example of modern banking—as well as a massively profitable investment. In the secret world of private equity, few buyouts have been written about with such clarity, detail, and insight—and none with such completeness, covering not only the dealmaking but also the transformation and eventual exit of the investment.It is difficult to introduce the author, Weijian Shan, in a few words. He holds an MA and a PhD from the University of California, Berkeley, and an MBA from the University of San Francisco. He lives in Hong Kong; he is chairman and CEO of PAG, a private equity firm. Prior to PAG, he was a partner at TPG, a private equity firm based in San Francisco. He also worked at the World Bank in Washington and at JP Morgan. He led a number of landmark transactions, including the acquisitions of Korea First Bank and China's Shenzhen Development Bank, both of which made his investors billions of dollars in profits and were made into case studies by Harvard Business School. He also held teaching positions, first in China then at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, where he founded the China Economic Review. Shan is a frequent contributor to journals and newspapers such as The New York Times, Financial Times, and WSJ. Weijian Shan’s first book ‘Out of the Gobi: My Story of China and America’, was called ‘a deeply affecting memoir’ by the Wall Street Journal and one of The Financial Times’ 2019 top ten Best Books of the Year. It details Shan’s raw will to succeed, and survive, against all odds as a former hard laborer as a member of the Inner Mongolia Construction Army Corp, to become one of the more respected and successful financiers in the ‘new China. Out of the Gobi was published in 2019 by Wiley and became a bestseller.In my interview with him, we spoke about the context of the Asian financial crisis and the international rescue efforts. We discussed how private equity can be a force for good ad create value. I asked what can we learn from the Asian financial crisis of 1998 that we can apply to our current global financial crisis. We also discussed the potential of Asia / West relations. This is in fact an important theme in his previous book too. In short, Money Games is a great book (more than what the title could let you guess) that a diverse readership will find interesting: economists, political scientists, businessmen, policymakers. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

41mins

8 Jan 2021

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Weijian Shan, "Money Games: The Inside Story of How American Dealmakers Saved Korea's Most Iconic Bank" (John Wiley, 2020)

New Books in Finance

Money Games: The Inside Story of How American Dealmakers Saved Korea’s Most Iconic Bank (Wiley, 2020) by Weijian Shan’s, is a riveting tale of one of the most successful buyout deals ever: the acquisition and turnaround of what used to be Korea’s largest bank by the American firm Newbridge Capital. Full of intrigue and suspense, this insider's account is told by the chief architect of the deal itself, the celebrated author and private equity investor Weijian Shan. With billions of dollars at stake, and the nation's economic future on the line, Newbridge Capital sought to become the first foreign firm in history to take control of one of Korea’s most beloved financial institutions. In a proud country still reeling from a humiliating International Monetary Fund bailout in the Asian Financial Crisis, Newbridge Capital had to muster every ounce of skill, determination, and patience to bring the deal to closing. Shan takes readers inside the battle to win control of the bank—a delicate, often exasperating process that meant balancing the goals of Newbridge with those of the government, bank employees, and Korea's powerful industrial titans. The author describes how Newbridge transformed and rebuilt the struggling bank into a shining example of modern banking—as well as a massively profitable investment. In the secret world of private equity, few buyouts have been written about with such clarity, detail, and insight—and none with such completeness, covering not only the dealmaking but also the transformation and eventual exit of the investment.It is difficult to introduce the author, Weijian Shan, in a few words. He holds an MA and a PhD from the University of California, Berkeley, and an MBA from the University of San Francisco. He lives in Hong Kong; he is chairman and CEO of PAG, a private equity firm. Prior to PAG, he was a partner at TPG, a private equity firm based in San Francisco. He also worked at the World Bank in Washington and at JP Morgan. He led a number of landmark transactions, including the acquisitions of Korea First Bank and China's Shenzhen Development Bank, both of which made his investors billions of dollars in profits and were made into case studies by Harvard Business School. He also held teaching positions, first in China then at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, where he founded the China Economic Review. Shan is a frequent contributor to journals and newspapers such as The New York Times, Financial Times, and WSJ. Weijian Shan’s first book ‘Out of the Gobi: My Story of China and America’, was called ‘a deeply affecting memoir’ by the Wall Street Journal and one of The Financial Times’ 2019 top ten Best Books of the Year. It details Shan’s raw will to succeed, and survive, against all odds as a former hard laborer as a member of the Inner Mongolia Construction Army Corp, to become one of the more respected and successful financiers in the ‘new China. Out of the Gobi was published in 2019 by Wiley and became a bestseller.In my interview with him, we spoke about the context of the Asian financial crisis and the international rescue efforts. We discussed how private equity can be a force for good ad create value. I asked what can we learn from the Asian financial crisis of 1998 that we can apply to our current global financial crisis. We also discussed the potential of Asia / West relations. This is in fact an important theme in his previous book too. In short, Money Games is a great book (more than what the title could let you guess) that a diverse readership will find interesting: economists, political scientists, businessmen, policymakers. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/finance

41mins

8 Jan 2021

Most Popular

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Weijian Shan, "Money Games: The Inside Story of How American Dealmakers Saved Korea's Most Iconic Bank" (John Wiley, 2020)

New Books in Korean Studies

Money Games: The Inside Story of How American Dealmakers Saved Korea’s Most Iconic Bank (Wiley, 2020) by Weijian Shan’s, is a riveting tale of one of the most successful buyout deals ever: the acquisition and turnaround of what used to be Korea’s largest bank by the American firm Newbridge Capital. Full of intrigue and suspense, this insider's account is told by the chief architect of the deal itself, the celebrated author and private equity investor Weijian Shan. With billions of dollars at stake, and the nation's economic future on the line, Newbridge Capital sought to become the first foreign firm in history to take control of one of Korea’s most beloved financial institutions. In a proud country still reeling from a humiliating International Monetary Fund bailout in the Asian Financial Crisis, Newbridge Capital had to muster every ounce of skill, determination, and patience to bring the deal to closing. Shan takes readers inside the battle to win control of the bank—a delicate, often exasperating process that meant balancing the goals of Newbridge with those of the government, bank employees, and Korea's powerful industrial titans. The author describes how Newbridge transformed and rebuilt the struggling bank into a shining example of modern banking—as well as a massively profitable investment. In the secret world of private equity, few buyouts have been written about with such clarity, detail, and insight—and none with such completeness, covering not only the dealmaking but also the transformation and eventual exit of the investment.It is difficult to introduce the author, Weijian Shan, in a few words. He holds an MA and a PhD from the University of California, Berkeley, and an MBA from the University of San Francisco. He lives in Hong Kong; he is chairman and CEO of PAG, a private equity firm. Prior to PAG, he was a partner at TPG, a private equity firm based in San Francisco. He also worked at the World Bank in Washington and at JP Morgan. He led a number of landmark transactions, including the acquisitions of Korea First Bank and China's Shenzhen Development Bank, both of which made his investors billions of dollars in profits and were made into case studies by Harvard Business School. He also held teaching positions, first in China then at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, where he founded the China Economic Review. Shan is a frequent contributor to journals and newspapers such as The New York Times, Financial Times, and WSJ. Weijian Shan’s first book ‘Out of the Gobi: My Story of China and America’, was called ‘a deeply affecting memoir’ by the Wall Street Journal and one of The Financial Times’ 2019 top ten Best Books of the Year. It details Shan’s raw will to succeed, and survive, against all odds as a former hard laborer as a member of the Inner Mongolia Construction Army Corp, to become one of the more respected and successful financiers in the ‘new China. Out of the Gobi was published in 2019 by Wiley and became a bestseller.In my interview with him, we spoke about the context of the Asian financial crisis and the international rescue efforts. We discussed how private equity can be a force for good ad create value. I asked what can we learn from the Asian financial crisis of 1998 that we can apply to our current global financial crisis. We also discussed the potential of Asia / West relations. This is in fact an important theme in his previous book too. In short, Money Games is a great book (more than what the title could let you guess) that a diverse readership will find interesting: economists, political scientists, businessmen, policymakers. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/korean-studies

41mins

8 Jan 2021

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Weijian Shan, "Money Games: The Inside Story of How American Dealmakers Saved Korea's Most Iconic Bank" (John Wiley, 2020)

New Books in Economics

Money Games: The Inside Story of How American Dealmakers Saved Korea’s Most Iconic Bank (Wiley, 2020) by Weijian Shan’s, is a riveting tale of one of the most successful buyout deals ever: the acquisition and turnaround of what used to be Korea’s largest bank by the American firm Newbridge Capital. Full of intrigue and suspense, this insider's account is told by the chief architect of the deal itself, the celebrated author and private equity investor Weijian Shan. With billions of dollars at stake, and the nation's economic future on the line, Newbridge Capital sought to become the first foreign firm in history to take control of one of Korea’s most beloved financial institutions. In a proud country still reeling from a humiliating International Monetary Fund bailout in the Asian Financial Crisis, Newbridge Capital had to muster every ounce of skill, determination, and patience to bring the deal to closing. Shan takes readers inside the battle to win control of the bank—a delicate, often exasperating process that meant balancing the goals of Newbridge with those of the government, bank employees, and Korea's powerful industrial titans. The author describes how Newbridge transformed and rebuilt the struggling bank into a shining example of modern banking—as well as a massively profitable investment. In the secret world of private equity, few buyouts have been written about with such clarity, detail, and insight—and none with such completeness, covering not only the dealmaking but also the transformation and eventual exit of the investment.It is difficult to introduce the author, Weijian Shan, in a few words. He holds an MA and a PhD from the University of California, Berkeley, and an MBA from the University of San Francisco. He lives in Hong Kong; he is chairman and CEO of PAG, a private equity firm. Prior to PAG, he was a partner at TPG, a private equity firm based in San Francisco. He also worked at the World Bank in Washington and at JP Morgan. He led a number of landmark transactions, including the acquisitions of Korea First Bank and China's Shenzhen Development Bank, both of which made his investors billions of dollars in profits and were made into case studies by Harvard Business School. He also held teaching positions, first in China then at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, where he founded the China Economic Review. Shan is a frequent contributor to journals and newspapers such as The New York Times, Financial Times, and WSJ. Weijian Shan’s first book ‘Out of the Gobi: My Story of China and America’, was called ‘a deeply affecting memoir’ by the Wall Street Journal and one of The Financial Times’ 2019 top ten Best Books of the Year. It details Shan’s raw will to succeed, and survive, against all odds as a former hard laborer as a member of the Inner Mongolia Construction Army Corp, to become one of the more respected and successful financiers in the ‘new China. Out of the Gobi was published in 2019 by Wiley and became a bestseller.In my interview with him, we spoke about the context of the Asian financial crisis and the international rescue efforts. We discussed how private equity can be a force for good ad create value. I asked what can we learn from the Asian financial crisis of 1998 that we can apply to our current global financial crisis. We also discussed the potential of Asia / West relations. This is in fact an important theme in his previous book too. In short, Money Games is a great book (more than what the title could let you guess) that a diverse readership will find interesting: economists, political scientists, businessmen, policymakers. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/economics

41mins

8 Jan 2021

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#62 Weijian Shan - A Private Equity Deep Dive and Money Games

The Wall Street Lab

Weijian Shan is chairman and CEO of PAG, a leading Asia-focused private equity firm. Prior to PAG, he was a partner of TPG, and co-managing partner of TPG Asia (formerly known as Newbridge Capital).   Over two decades, Weijian Shan has led a number of landmark transactions. Previously, Shan was a managing director of JP Morgan, and an assistant professor at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. He holds an M.A. and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, and an M.B.A. from the University of San Francisco.    Shan is the author of Out of the Gobi: My Story of China and America (2019) and Money Games: The Inside Story of How American Dealmakers Saved Korea's Most Iconic Bank (2020). His articles and commentary have been published in the Financial Times, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Foreign Affairs and many other publications.   In this episode we speak about Private Equity. Shan walks us through the entire process of a Private Equity deal, from sourcing deals, the ins and outs buying a company, restructuring or turning around said company, and then exiting the deal successfully. We deep into some of the deals Shan lead during his more than 20 year career, most prominently into the acquisition of Korea First bank. We talk about his book Money Games and Shan leaves us with some fantastic career advice.

1hr 1min

7 Jan 2021

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Ep. 923: Weijian Shan Interview with Michael Covel on Trend Following Radio

Michael Covel's Trend Following

My guest today Weijian Shan takes me through too fantastic stories. Money Games is a tale of one of the most successful buyout deals ever: the acquisition and turnaround of what used to be Korea’s largest bank by the American firm Newbridge Capital. This insider’s account is told by the chief architect of the deal itself, the celebrated author and private equity investor Weijian Shan. With billions of dollars at stake, and the nation’s economic future on the line, Newbridge Capital sought to become the first foreign firm in history to take control of one of Korea’s most beloved financial institutions. In a proud country still reeling from a humiliating International Monetary Fund bailout in the Asian Financial Crisis, Newbridge Capital had to muster every ounce of skill, determination, and patience to bring the deal to closing. Shan takes readers inside the battle to win control of the bank―a delicate, often exasperating process that meant balancing the goals of Newbridge with those of the government, bank employees, and Korea’s powerful industrial titans. Finally, the author describes how Newbridge transformed and rebuilt the struggling bank into a shining example of modern banking―as well as a massively profitable investment. Out of the Gobi draws a vivid picture of the raw human energy and the will to succeed against all odds. Shan only finished elementary school when Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution tore his country apart. He was a witness to the brutality and absurdity of Mao’s policies during one of the most tumultuous eras in China’s history. Exiled to the Gobi Desert at age 15 and denied schooling for 10 years, he endured untold hardships without ever giving up his dream for an education. Shan’s improbable journey, from the Gobi to the “People’s Republic of Berkeley” and far beyond, is a uniquely American success story – told with a splash of humor, deep insight and rich and engaging detail. This powerful and personal perspective on China and America will inform Americans’ view of China, humanizing the country, while providing a rare view of America from the prism of a keen foreign observer who lived the American dream. Bio: Weijian Shan is chairman and CEO of PAG, a leading Asia-focused private equity firm. Prior to PAG, he was a partner of the private equity firm TPG, and co-managing partner of TPG Asia (formerly known as Newbridge Capital). Over two decades, Weijian Shan has led a number of landmark transactions that have returned billions of dollars in profit to his firms’ investors. Previously, Shan was a managing director of JP Morgan, and an assistant professor at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. In his youth, he spent several years working as a laborer in the Gobi Desert of China.

47mins

27 Nov 2020

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Money Games: Negotiating Private Equity (w/ Weijian Shan)

Inside Asia Podcast

When the influence of private capital exceeds that of a sovereign state, it raises an important question: Where does real power reside? Increasingly, it seems, money makes the world go round. At a time when stocks are over-valued, bond yields are flat, and property prices are inflated, private equity is where it’s at. Indeed, since the chaos of the 2008 Global Financial Crises, PE firms have only grown in size and influence. Asia has been a key beneficiary. And China – until recently – has absorbed the lion’s share of private capital. As and when US-China tensions subside, the surge is likely to continue In this week’s episode of Inside Asia, I speak to one of the PE industry giants - Weijian Shan, Chairman and CEO of PAG Group. Shan’s new book, Money Games: The Inside Story of How American Dealmakers Saved Korea’s Most Iconic Bank, is a tale on how deals get done in the convoluted world of big money and big personalities. It’s been over 20 years since Shan and his colleagues at Newbridge Capital landed in Seoul to rescue Korea First Bank, but he tells it like it happened only yesterday. The transaction is epic in both size and circumstance. But it also speaks to the central importance of developing personal trust and accountability to offset fears of xenophobia and big money exploitation. It also speaks to the enormity of PE as a vehicle for rescuing distressed businesses – a point not lost in these pandemic times.

51mins

2 Nov 2020

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Investing in US-China Relations - Weijian Shan and James Kralik

China 21

As we are living through a historic pandemic and ever more turbulent U.S.-China relations, we revisit a conversation recorded at our last public lecture right before the lockdown. 21st Century China Board Chair James Kralik interviews investor and best-selling author Weijian Shan about his memoir of living through the trauma and turmoil of Mao’s Cultural Revolution to become one of Asia’s most successful financiers, and how to move forward on constructive U.S.-China relations.Watch Shan’s full presentation for the So Kwan Lok Distinguished Lecture series on china.ucsd.eduWeijian Shan is chairman and CEO of PAG, a private equity firm. Prior to PAG, he was a partner of TPG and co-managing partner of TPG Asia. He led a number of landmark transactions including the acquisitions of Korea First Bank and China’s Shenzhen Development Bank, both of which made his investors billions of dollars in profits and were made into case studies of Harvard Business School. He holds an M.A. and a Ph.D. from UC Berkeley, and an M.B.A. from the Univer­sity of San Francisco.James Kralik is the board chair for the 21st Century China Center. He is Managing Director of Linden Street Capital Ltd. and a Director of Milestone Capital Investment Holdings Ltd. Over the last fifteen years, these investment vehicles have been involved with a number of leading Chinese businesses in the alternative energy, advertising media, and consumer sectors. Based in Shanghai, Kralik began his career at McKinsey & Company and has lived and worked in China for nearly thirty years.Editor/Host: Samuel Tsoi, UC San Diego 
Music: Dave Liang/Shanghai Restoration Project

43mins

18 May 2020

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