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Yarimar Bonilla

11 Podcast Episodes

Latest 6 Nov 2021 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

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Episode 63: Yarimar Bonilla

Indoor Voices

Yarimar Bonilla, Professor in the Department of Africana & Puerto Rican/Latino Studies at Hunter College and in the PhD Program in Anthropology at the Graduate Center, assumes the role of Acting Director of El Centro, the Center for Puerto Rican Studies at Hunter College, on July 1. In this episode, she talks with Vanessa Valdés, Director of the Black Studies Program and Professor of Spanish and Portuguese at City College. Visit indoorvoicespodcast.com

1hr 11mins

21 Jun 2021

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S2. Ep. 8: El vaivén de Yarimar Bonilla

Torres Gotay Entrevista

Nuestra invitada de hoy conoce, como pocos, la experiencia de la emigración. Se fue con su mamá a Estados Unidos a los cinco años, volvió unos años después y, otra vez, al poco  tiempo, regresó a Estados Unidos a hacer estudios graduados. Hoy es la directora interina del Centro de Estudios Puertorriqueños del Hunter College de la Universidad de la Ciudad de Nueva York , la institución que con más consistencia y ahínco ha estudiado la experiencia de la diáspora puertorriqueña en Estados Unidos. En Torres Gotay Entrevista hoy, la antropóloga, profesora, escritora y hoy directora del Centro, Yarimar Bonilla, sobre la diáspora, el coloniaje, el Caribe y el presente y el futuro de Puerto Rico.

1hr

5 May 2021

Similar People

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BONUS: Aftershocks of Disaster with Dr. Yarimar Bonilla & Ald. Rosanna Rodriguez

Paseo Podcast: Sharing Puerto Rican Stories

It's a special bonus episode of the Paseo Podcast! Joshua attended an event at the National Museum of Puerto Rican Arts & Culture on October 24, 2019 to listen in on a conversation between Dr. Yarimar Bonilla & Ald. Rosanna Rodriguez (33rd Ward, Chicago). The conversation was centered around the recent release of the book, Aftershocks of Disaster: Puerto Rico Before and After the Storm, which Yarimar co-edited. Jose Lopez, Executive Director of the Puerto Rican Cultural Center in Chicago introduces both speakers at the start of the recording. There were some technical difficulties with the museum sound system, so this audio will sound different than what you're used to. Host: Joshua Smyser-DeLeon, Twitter @jsdeleon Site: paseomedia.org Facebook & Twitter: @paseopodcast Sounds: MEINL Percussion Yarimar's Twitter & Website Rosanna's Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, & Website Rosanna's 33rd Ward Twitter, Facebook, & Website Aftershocks of Disaster: Puerto Rico Before and After the Storm Puerto Rican Cultural Center

1hr 18mins

8 Jan 2020

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Colonialism in Puerto Rico with Yarimar Bonilla

The Dig

Maria hit Puerto Rico as austerity dismantled its social and material infrastructure. But as Yarimar Bonilla explains, these years also taught Puerto Ricans about their own collective power, fueling the summer’s mass movement that overthrew Governor Ricardo Rosselló. Thanks to Verso Books. Check out their huge selection of left-wing titles at www.versobooks.comPlease support this podcast at Patreon.com/TheDig

1hr 34mins

15 Nov 2019

Most Popular

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The Dig: Colonialism in Puerto Rico with Yarimar Bonilla

Jacobin Radio

Maria hit Puerto Rico as austerity dismantled its social and material infrastructure. But as Yarimar Bonilla explains, these years also taught Puerto Ricans about their own collective power, fueling the summer’s mass movement that overthrew Governor Ricardo Rosselló.Thanks to Verso Books. Check out their huge selection of left-wing titles at www.versobooks.comPlease support this podcast at Patreon.com/TheDig See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

1hr 34mins

15 Nov 2019

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Marisol LeBrón and Yarimar Bonilla, "Aftershocks of Disaster: Puerto Rico Before and After the Storm" (Haymarket, 2019)

New Books in Caribbean Studies

Marking the two year anniversary of Hurricane María making landfall in Puerto Rico, the September 2019 release of the anthology Aftershocks of Disaster: Puerto Rico Before and After the Storm (Haymarket Books, 2019) brings together a collective of artists, journalists, and scholars to reflect on the multiple disasters that have hit the island and how the people of Puerto Rico have responded.Marisol LeBrón and Yarimar Bonilla, the editors of the anthology, in their editor’s introduction foreground the history of Puerto Rico’s continual state failure. Social abandonment, capitalization, and collective trauma were not simply a result of María, but instead, María revealed the systemic failures of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Government. “Long before María, Puerto Rico was already suffering the effects of a prolonged economic recession, spiraling levels of debt, and deep austerity cuts to public resources,” wrote Bonilla and LeBrón (5). María and its aftermath was not only a disaster in itself but an aftershock of both colonialism and the financial crisis decades in the making.Aftershocks of Disaster offers poetry, theater, discussions about technology, photography, and other mediums as ways through which to produce and access knowledge about the multiple disasters before and after Hurricane María. Particularly inspiring are the discussions and critiques around notions of resistance, resiliency, and recovery on the archipelago. The anthology allows readers to imagine futures reliant on the self-determination of the people of Puerto Rico. As we find ourselves at the two year anniversary of Hurricane María and in the midst of more natural disasters in the Caribbean and the greater Atlantic Ocean, Aftershocks of Disaster will continue to serve as an epistemological and pedagogical tool for scholars.NYU Latinx Project Video here.PR syllabus here.Jonathan Cortez is a Ph.D. candidate of American Studies at Brown University. They are a historian of 20th-century issues of race, labor, (im)migration, surveillance, space, relational Ethnic Studies, and Latinx Studies. Their research focuses on the rise of federally-funded encampments (i.e., the concentration of populations) from the advent of the New Deal until post-WWII era. Their dissertation, “The Age of Encampment: Race, Surveillance, and the Power of Spatial Scripts, 1933-1975” reveals underlying continuities between the presence of threatening bodies and the increasing surveillance of these bodies in camps throughout the United States. Jonathan is currently a Ford Predoctoral Fellow as well as an assistant curator at the Smithsonian National Museum of American History. You can follow Jonathan on Twitter @joncortz and on their personal website www.historiancortez.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/caribbean-studies

1hr 1min

4 Oct 2019

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Marisol LeBrón and Yarimar Bonilla, "Aftershocks of Disaster: Puerto Rico Before and After the Storm" (Haymarket, 2019)

New Books in Latino Studies

Marking the two year anniversary of Hurricane María making landfall in Puerto Rico, the September 2019 release of the anthology Aftershocks of Disaster: Puerto Rico Before and After the Storm (Haymarket Books, 2019) brings together a collective of artists, journalists, and scholars to reflect on the multiple disasters that have hit the island and how the people of Puerto Rico have responded.Marisol LeBrón and Yarimar Bonilla, the editors of the anthology, in their editor’s introduction foreground the history of Puerto Rico’s continual state failure. Social abandonment, capitalization, and collective trauma were not simply a result of María, but instead, María revealed the systemic failures of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Government. “Long before María, Puerto Rico was already suffering the effects of a prolonged economic recession, spiraling levels of debt, and deep austerity cuts to public resources,” wrote Bonilla and LeBrón (5). María and its aftermath was not only a disaster in itself but an aftershock of both colonialism and the financial crisis decades in the making.Aftershocks of Disaster offers poetry, theater, discussions about technology, photography, and other mediums as ways through which to produce and access knowledge about the multiple disasters before and after Hurricane María. Particularly inspiring are the discussions and critiques around notions of resistance, resiliency, and recovery on the archipelago. The anthology allows readers to imagine futures reliant on the self-determination of the people of Puerto Rico. As we find ourselves at the two year anniversary of Hurricane María and in the midst of more natural disasters in the Caribbean and the greater Atlantic Ocean, Aftershocks of Disaster will continue to serve as an epistemological and pedagogical tool for scholars.NYU Latinx Project Video here.PR syllabus here.Jonathan Cortez is a Ph.D. candidate of American Studies at Brown University. They are a historian of 20th-century issues of race, labor, (im)migration, surveillance, space, relational Ethnic Studies, and Latinx Studies. Their research focuses on the rise of federally-funded encampments (i.e., the concentration of populations) from the advent of the New Deal until post-WWII era. Their dissertation, “The Age of Encampment: Race, Surveillance, and the Power of Spatial Scripts, 1933-1975” reveals underlying continuities between the presence of threatening bodies and the increasing surveillance of these bodies in camps throughout the United States. Jonathan is currently a Ford Predoctoral Fellow as well as an assistant curator at the Smithsonian National Museum of American History. You can follow Jonathan on Twitter @joncortz and on their personal website www.historiancortez.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/latino-studies

1hr 1min

4 Oct 2019

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Marisol LeBrón and Yarimar Bonilla, "Aftershocks of Disaster: Puerto Rico Before and After the Storm" (Haymarket, 2019)

New Books in American Studies

Marking the two year anniversary of Hurricane María making landfall in Puerto Rico, the September 2019 release of the anthology Aftershocks of Disaster: Puerto Rico Before and After the Storm (Haymarket Books, 2019) brings together a collective of artists, journalists, and scholars to reflect on the multiple disasters that have hit the island and how the people of Puerto Rico have responded.Marisol LeBrón and Yarimar Bonilla, the editors of the anthology, in their editor’s introduction foreground the history of Puerto Rico’s continual state failure. Social abandonment, capitalization, and collective trauma were not simply a result of María, but instead, María revealed the systemic failures of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Government. “Long before María, Puerto Rico was already suffering the effects of a prolonged economic recession, spiraling levels of debt, and deep austerity cuts to public resources,” wrote Bonilla and LeBrón (5). María and its aftermath was not only a disaster in itself but an aftershock of both colonialism and the financial crisis decades in the making.Aftershocks of Disaster offers poetry, theater, discussions about technology, photography, and other mediums as ways through which to produce and access knowledge about the multiple disasters before and after Hurricane María. Particularly inspiring are the discussions and critiques around notions of resistance, resiliency, and recovery on the archipelago. The anthology allows readers to imagine futures reliant on the self-determination of the people of Puerto Rico. As we find ourselves at the two year anniversary of Hurricane María and in the midst of more natural disasters in the Caribbean and the greater Atlantic Ocean, Aftershocks of Disaster will continue to serve as an epistemological and pedagogical tool for scholars.NYU Latinx Project Video here.PR syllabus here.Jonathan Cortez is a Ph.D. candidate of American Studies at Brown University. They are a historian of 20th-century issues of race, labor, (im)migration, surveillance, space, relational Ethnic Studies, and Latinx Studies. Their research focuses on the rise of federally-funded encampments (i.e., the concentration of populations) from the advent of the New Deal until post-WWII era. Their dissertation, “The Age of Encampment: Race, Surveillance, and the Power of Spatial Scripts, 1933-1975” reveals underlying continuities between the presence of threatening bodies and the increasing surveillance of these bodies in camps throughout the United States. Jonathan is currently a Ford Predoctoral Fellow as well as an assistant curator at the Smithsonian National Museum of American History. You can follow Jonathan on Twitter @joncortz and on their personal website www.historiancortez.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

1hr 1min

4 Oct 2019

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Yarimar Bonilla, “Non-Sovereign Futures: French Caribbean Politics in the Wake of Disenchantment” (U of Chicago Press, 2015)

New Books in European Studies

As overseas departments of France, the islands of Guadeloupe and Martinique are frequently described as anomalies within the postcolonial Caribbean. Yet in reality, as Yarimar Bonilla argues in her new book Non-Sovereign Futures: French Caribbean Politics in the Wake of Disenchantment (University of Chicago Press, 2015), the majority of Caribbean states are in fact non-sovereign. Moreover, even for those nations that are nominally independent, their sovereignty is nonetheless continually compromised by the foreign influence that comes with globalization. Thus, the Caribbean as a whole is a region where non-sovereignty is the dominant political status, requiring alternative political frameworks that move beyond identifying sovereignty as the inevitable and necessary result of decolonization. Bonilla calls this process of imagining and testing out these new frameworks “non-sovereign politics.” Non-Sovereign Futures examines the emergence of non-sovereign politics through an ethnography of labor activists in Guadeloupe. Whereas union activists had explicitly nationalist agendas in the 1950s and 1960s, by the early 2000s, sovereignty was no longer the terrain on which activists made claims upon the state. Bonilla provides a compelling analysis of the ways that Guadeloupean labor activists disrupted island life through a series of labor and general strikes, engaged and shaped the historical legacies of slavery and emancipation, and transformed their own personal political selves. Though these activists frequently expressed disappointment with the results of these strikes, Bonilla insists that their true accomplishment was in imagining new possibilities for making claims upon the French state that were no longer bound to the unsatisfying question of sovereignty. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/european-studies

47mins

10 Dec 2015

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Yarimar Bonilla, “Non-Sovereign Futures: French Caribbean Politics in the Wake of Disenchantment” (U of Chicago Press, 2015)

New Books in Anthropology

As overseas departments of France, the islands of Guadeloupe and Martinique are frequently described as anomalies within the postcolonial Caribbean. Yet in reality, as Yarimar Bonilla argues in her new book Non-Sovereign Futures: French Caribbean Politics in the Wake of Disenchantment (University of Chicago Press, 2015), the majority of Caribbean states are in fact non-sovereign. Moreover, even for those nations that are nominally independent, their sovereignty is nonetheless continually compromised by the foreign influence that comes with globalization. Thus, the Caribbean as a whole is a region where non-sovereignty is the dominant political status, requiring alternative political frameworks that move beyond identifying sovereignty as the inevitable and necessary result of decolonization. Bonilla calls this process of imagining and testing out these new frameworks “non-sovereign politics.” Non-Sovereign Futures examines the emergence of non-sovereign politics through an ethnography of labor activists in Guadeloupe. Whereas union activists had explicitly nationalist agendas in the 1950s and 1960s, by the early 2000s, sovereignty was no longer the terrain on which activists made claims upon the state. Bonilla provides a compelling analysis of the ways that Guadeloupean labor activists disrupted island life through a series of labor and general strikes, engaged and shaped the historical legacies of slavery and emancipation, and transformed their own personal political selves. Though these activists frequently expressed disappointment with the results of these strikes, Bonilla insists that their true accomplishment was in imagining new possibilities for making claims upon the French state that were no longer bound to the unsatisfying question of sovereignty. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/anthropology

46mins

10 Dec 2015

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