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Paul Cartledge

15 Podcast Episodes

Latest 24 Sep 2022 | Updated Daily

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Sex, Soldiers and Thebes with James Romm, Paul Cartledge and Helene Foley

Classical Wisdom Speaks

Formed in 379 BC to combat the Spartan threat...Hailed by Plato as a force that could never be beaten...The last hope to preserve the freedom of Greece...Buried together on the spot they fell....300 male lovers reveal a dramatic ancient tale whose story will leave you gripped into the end. James Romm of Bard College, and author of the Sacred Band, discusses Sex, Soldiers and Thebes with Cambridge Professor, Paul Cartledge, and Columbia Professor, Helene Foley. Moderated by Anya Leonard of Classical Wisdom. They delve into the history of Thebes, the evolution of male eros and the essential role of the Sacred Band in fighting for Greek democracy. About the Speakers: James Romm is the James H. Ottaway Jr. Professor of Classics at Bard College and specializes in ancient Greek and Roman culture and civilization.  Dr. Romm is author of several books, including Dying Every Day: Seneca at the Court of Nero, Ghost on the Throne: The Death of Alexander the Great and most recently, “The Sacred Band: Three Hundred Theban Lovers fighting to save Greek Freedom”. Paul Anthony Cartledge is the A. G. Leventis Professor of Greek Culture at the University of Cambridge and Fellow of Clare College. He has published extensively on Greek history over several decades, including The Cambridge Illustrated History of Ancient Greece, Alexander the Great: The Hunt for a New Past as well as Thebes: The Forgotten City of Ancient Greece (2020) Helene P. Foley is Professor of Classical Studies at Barnard College, Columbia University and a member of the Institute for Research on Women, Gender and Sexuality at Columbia. She specialises in ancient Greek literature, women and gender in antiquity, and the reception of classical drama. Helene is author of many books, her most recent being Reimagining Greek Tragedy on the American Stag.Anya Leonard, Founder and Director of Classical Wisdom, a platform dedicated to bringing ancient wisdom to Modern Minds.   For more information about Classical Wisdom and Podcast Classical Wisdom Speaks, please check out our website at: http://classicalwisdom.comYou can buy the speakers' excellent books below: The Sacred Band: Three Hundred Theban Lovers fighting to save Greek Freedom: Thebes: The Forgotten City of Ancient GreeceReimagining Greek Tragedy on the American StagSign up to get Classical Wisdom's Free newsletter as well as a FREE E-book on the "Two Sides of Jesus", Here: https://classicalwisdom.com/free-e-book-two-sides-of-jesus/

1hr 15mins

26 Jun 2021

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Commerce in Archaic Greece w. Dr Paul Cartledge

Ithaca Bound

University of Cambridge Emeritus Professor, Dr Paul Cartledge, joins the show to discuss commerce in archaic Greece.

43mins

20 Apr 2021

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5. Paul Cartledge (2017)

Chalke Talk

HERODOTUS: THE FATHER OF HISTORYThe ‘Father of History’ was a Greek living in Persia in the 5th century BC but was the first person to write down the stories from the past. Herodotus’ Histories remains one of the richest and most read books of all time, and in this talk renowned classicist Professor Paul Cartledge discusses the life of this great man, his enduring legacy and his relevance even to this day. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

37mins

11 Jan 2021

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Paul Cartledge: Thinking like a Theban

The Hedgehog and the Fox

For all its importance to Greek history and myth, Thebes – Seven-gated Thebes whose patron god was Dionysus, birthplace of Herakles, the city of Oedipus and Antigone – tends to get bit parts in the broader story of ancient Greece. Until now. Paul Cartledge, Emeritus A.G. Leventis Professor of Greek Culture at Cambridge University, has devoted a whole book to what he calls the ‘forgotten city’ of ancient Greece. I think you’re likely to find it fascinating for the fresh insights that a shift in perspective can bring, seeing the world not from ‘violet-crowned’ Athens – as Theban poet Pindar put it – but from ‘the dancing floor of Ares’, Thebes. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

42mins

12 Nov 2020

Most Popular

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Paul Cartledge: The Battle of Thermopylae (480 BCE)

Travels Through Time

In this episode of Travels Through Time, British ancient historian and academic Professor Paul Cartledge, takes us back to the 'Graeco-Persian Wars' to visit a major event in the history of western civilisation and culture.  The mighty Persian empire - based in Iran, founded by Cyrus II in the mid-6th century BCE - launches a massive amphibious expedition in the spring of 480 led by Persian King-Emperor Xerxes. Their aim is to punish Persia's Greek subjects, who together with Eretria and Athens, have risen up in armed rebellion.    This forces all the many Greek cities of the mainland to make a choice: cave in without a fight, try to stay neutral, or resist. The latter was the choice of some 30-plus cities, led by the legendary Sparta King, Leonidas.  Show notes Scene One: Sparta - King Leonidas chooses 'the 300' for Thermopylae Scene Two:  Thermopylae - a 1-kilometre long E-W pass in northern Greece, where Thessaly (a region whose rulers were already on the Persian side) gives way to (resisting, loyalist) Phocis. Scene Three: The morning of the final day of the Battle Memento: A bronze Persian arrowhead ---- People Presenter: Artemis Irvine Interview: Violet Moller Guest: Paul Cartledge Production: Maria Nolan Podcast partner: Colorgraph Follow us on Twitter: @tttpodcast_

53mins

20 Oct 2020

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The Forgotten City of Ancient Greece (w/ Paul Cartledge)

Ancient Heroes

Thebes was once the most powerful city-state in Greece, but it has largely been overshadowed in popular culture by Athens and Sparta. Historian Paul Cartledge and I discuss the rise and fall of Thebes, and what impact it made on the ancient world.

53mins

6 Oct 2020

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Paul Cartledge, “Democracy: A Life” (Oxford UP, 2016)

New Books in Law

The Western concept of democracy has a lineage dating back to the classical world. Paul Cartledge’s book Democracy: A Life (Oxford University Press, 2016) details its origins in ancient Greece and its evolution of it as a theory over the course of the 2,500 years since then. As he explains, what people think of as “classical Greek” democracy was primarily the Athenian concept of it, which was one of several versions that emerged during the Hellenic era. Though typically viewed as at its peak during the days of the Athenian empire, Cartledge sees the “golden age” of democracy as taking place in the 4th century BCE rather than in the preceding one, a shift which attests to the endurance of democracy as a governing system. It was during Roman times when the practice of democracy declined, to the point where it was often seen as a failed or impractical system during the Middle Ages. It was not until the 17th century when democracy staged a comeback in the West, with its advocates in the 18th and 19th centuries championing it as the best possible form of government – a status it continues to hold in the West even with the strains it faces today. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/law

1hr 3mins

14 May 2018

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Paul Cartledge, “Democracy: A Life” (Oxford UP, 2016)

New Books in History

The Western concept of democracy has a lineage dating back to the classical world. Paul Cartledge’s book Democracy: A Life (Oxford University Press, 2016) details its origins in ancient Greece and its evolution of it as a theory over the course of the 2,500 years since then. As he explains, what people think of as “classical Greek” democracy was primarily the Athenian concept of it, which was one of several versions that emerged during the Hellenic era. Though typically viewed as at its peak during the days of the Athenian empire, Cartledge sees the “golden age” of democracy as taking place in the 4th century BCE rather than in the preceding one, a shift which attests to the endurance of democracy as a governing system. It was during Roman times when the practice of democracy declined, to the point where it was often seen as a failed or impractical system during the Middle Ages. It was not until the 17th century when democracy staged a comeback in the West, with its advocates in the 18th and 19th centuries championing it as the best possible form of government – a status it continues to hold in the West even with the strains it faces today. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

1hr 4mins

14 May 2018

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Paul Cartledge, “Democracy: A Life” (Oxford UP, 2016)

New Books in Political Science

The Western concept of democracy has a lineage dating back to the classical world. Paul Cartledge’s book Democracy: A Life (Oxford University Press, 2016) details its origins in ancient Greece and its evolution of it as a theory over the course of the 2,500 years since then. As he explains, what people think of as “classical Greek” democracy was primarily the Athenian concept of it, which was one of several versions that emerged during the Hellenic era. Though typically viewed as at its peak during the days of the Athenian empire, Cartledge sees the “golden age” of democracy as taking place in the 4th century BCE rather than in the preceding one, a shift which attests to the endurance of democracy as a governing system. It was during Roman times when the practice of democracy declined, to the point where it was often seen as a failed or impractical system during the Middle Ages. It was not until the 17th century when democracy staged a comeback in the West, with its advocates in the 18th and 19th centuries championing it as the best possible form of government – a status it continues to hold in the West even with the strains it faces today. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/political-science

1hr 3mins

14 May 2018

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Episode 4: Expert Opinion - Paul Cartledge

Clear and Present Danger - A history of free speech

In our first expert opinion segment, Jacob Mchangama talks to Emeritus Professor of Greek Culture at Cambridge University Paul Cartledge. With his intimate knowledge of ancient Greece, we dive deeper into the concepts of free speech and democracy in Athens that were discussed in episode one. What are the differences between free speech in the Athenian democracy and free speech in a modern liberal democracy? What limits did religion set for Athenian free speech? Was Plato a totalitarian? And was the trial of Socrates mostly religious or political? The discussion also explores the differences between Athens and republican Rome, why free speech was alien to Sparta, and the rather condescending attitudes of the American Founding Fathers toward Athenian democracy (shame on you for defaming Pericles, Alexander Hamilton!). Cartledge has written extensively on ancient Athens. His authorship includes among many titles, the critically acclaimed “Democracy: A Life” and “Ancient Greek Political Thought In Practice.” Stay up to date with Clear and Present Danger on the show’s Facebook and Twitter pages, or visit the podcast’s website at freespeechhistory.com. Email us feedback at freespeechhistory@gmail.com.

59mins

8 Mar 2018

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