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Alan Weisman Podcasts

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12 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Alan Weisman. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Alan Weisman, often where they are interviewed.

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12 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Alan Weisman. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Alan Weisman, often where they are interviewed.

Updated daily with the latest episodes

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Alan Weisman: Friend of Homo Sapiens

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Science journalist Alan Weisman’s prescient 2007 book "The World Without Us" described what would happen to nature if humans suddenly ceased to exist. To find answers, he traveled to Chernobyl, Micronesia's coral reefs, and far beyond. For this special Earth Day 2020 episode, he explains what humans need to do to make sure we don't disappear. Listen along as Weisman connects the dots between food supplies, zoonotic diseases, global warming, and maybe a brighter future. Special thanks to our listeners for supporting us during this unpredictable time, that squirrel that borrowed some of our questions, and Connor Button, theme music creator. Follow us on Twitter @interruptshow, and rate, review, and subscribe on Apple, or wherever you get your podcasts, por favor.


Alan Weisman: el amigo de los Homo sapiens

El profético libro de 2007 del periodista científico Alan Weisman "El mundo sin nosotros" describió lo que sucedería con la naturaleza si los humanos de repente dejasen de existir. Para encontrar respuestas, viajó a Chernobyl, los arrecifes de coral de Micronesia y más allá. En este episodio especial del Día de la Tierra 2020, Weisman nos cuenta lo que debemos de hacer los humanos para garantizar que no desapareceremos. Escucha cómo nos descubre la conexión entre los suministros de alimentos, las enfermedades de los animales, el calentamiento global y, tal vez, un futuro más prometedor. Mandamos un agradecimiento especial a nuestros oyentes por apoyarnos durante este tiempo impredecible, a la ardilla que tomó prestadas algunas de nuestras preguntas, y a Connor Button, creador de la sintonía del programa. Síguenos en Twitter @interruptshow, y califica, critica y suscríbete en Apple, o donde quiera que obtengas tus podcasts, por favor.

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Apr 23 2020 · 47mins
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293: Alan Weisman: My Greatest Source of Environmental Hope

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Alan Weisman's book Countdown changed my strategy to the environment. It ranks among the top most influential works I've read, watched, or come across, up there with Limits to Growth.

Why? Because when you look at environmental issues enough, and it shouldn't take too long these days, population always rises to the top as one of the top issues. Many people today hear about projections that the population will level off around 10 billion. Actually, the ones I see project that the population will keep growing exponentially then, just slower than now.

If you only look at one issue---only climate, only deforestation, or only extinctions---they seem possibly solvable, but they're all linked. Solving several at once---say meeting power needs while the economy falls apart and food becomes scarce---looks impossible.

Also, since nothing deliberate limits population growth, we're lucky if it levels off. We aren't choosing where to level it off and 10 billion looks three to five times what the Earth can sustain. Cultural changes could promote more growth. Many populations are promoting maximum growth today---very powerful religions and autocratic rulers for example.

I don't want to rely on luck for our species' survival. Besides, my research into what Earth can sustain says that we're over the limit. If we're heading toward a cliff, simply maintaining our speed and not accelerating doesn't stop us. We have to decelerate.

Despite the convergence of all these issues, for years I held back from talking about population. People don't like others meddling in their personal lives. I don't want the government in my bedroom. People overwhelmingly associate population talk with China's one child policy, eugenics, and Nazis. I did too. I didn't see how I could improve a situation by suggesting to avoid misery later through misery now.

Still, I knew some cultures---island nations that lived centuries or longer, for example, or the bushmen in southern Africa whose archeological record went back hundreds of thousands of years---kept their populations level, so they must have developed some mechanism.

In some past episode of this podcast, with Jared Angaza, for example, I pondered aloud how to find out how they did it, though it may have come up when I was a guest on his podcast. I could only wonder what worked but couldn't promote what I didn't know.

Countdown changed all that. Alan found and reported on numerous examples in today's world of cultures lowering their birth rates without coercion, without top-down government authority, voluntarily, desired by all participants, leading to abundance, prosperity, peace, and stability, the opposite of where overpopulation takes us.

Countdown tells stories of 21 places, some promoting growth and results aren't pretty and some where they've lowered birth rates and they're remarkably pleasant, even prosperous and stable. He talks about the top ones in this episode.

We have tough times ahead of us. One change simplifies everything---a smaller population achieved voluntarily, peacefully, joyfully. Alan has researched firsthand more than almost anyone. He has more than enough reason to despair if he wanted to. If he's not, I conclude that everything he's found nets out to say we can do this.

Family planning, education, and contraception seem technologies and practices that can work more than carbon sequestration, solar planes, and everything else. They're cheap, they're available, they make sex more fun, they've overcome cultural resistance outside the gates of the Vatican!

Read his books and Limits to Growth.

I'll do my best to bring him back.

Past episodes I based on Alan's books

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Feb 20 2020 · 1hr 10mins
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248: Countdown, a book I recommend by Alan Weisman

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I just finished an eye-opening book, Countdown, by Alan Weisman. It covers population.

Weisman traveled to and reported on about a dozen places' views and practices on population and family planning.

In this episode, I read a few passages that I found shocking. I barely scratch the book's surface, but I believe you'll find the sections equally noteworthy. I recommend reading the rest to understand this integral part of our world.

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Nov 19 2019 · 21mins
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Alan Weisman: The World Without Us

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Today I am thrilled to talk with Alan Weisman. He is an author who’s worked on seven continents and more than 50 countries. He’s written six books and the book that I talked to him most about is The World Without Us. It’s a book he published about a decade ago. It began as a …

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The post Alan Weisman: The World Without Us first appeared on School for Good Living Podcasts.

Feb 12 2019 · 1hr 12mins
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Alan Weisman - Author "Countdown: Our Last, Best Hope for a Future on Earth 3/6/15

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Tara Sutphen will interview Alan Weisman - Author. His latest book is Countdown: Our Last, Best Hope for a Future on Earth?, published in 2013 by Little, Brown & Co, winner of the 2014 Los Angeles Times Book Prize, the 2013 Paris Book Festival Prize for Nonfiction, the 2014 Nautilus Gold Book Award, and a finalist for the Orion Prize and the Books for a Better Life Award. His last book, The World Without Us (Thomas Dunne Books/St. Martin's Press) was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award, for the Orion Prize, for the Rachel Carson Award, and for the J. Anthony Lukas Book Prize. It was named the Best Nonfiction Book of 2007 by Time Magazine, Entertainment Weekly, and the National Post (Canada); a Best of 2007 Media Pick by Mother Jones Magazine; the #1 Nonfiction Audiobook of 2007 by iTunes; one of the top five nonfiction books for 2007 by Salon, Barnes and Noble's Best Politics & Current Affairs Book of 2007, and winner of the Wenjin Book Prize of the National Library of China. Alan Weisman has many other books and he's been published in 34 languages. His articles have appeared in Harper's, The New York Times Magazine, The Atlantic Monthly, The Los Angeles Times Magazine, Orion, Vanity Fair, Wilson Quarterly, Audubon, Mother Jones, Discover, Condé Nast Traveler, and in many anthologies, including Best American Science Writing and Best Buddhist Writing. A senior editor and producer for Homelands Productions, his reports have been heard on National Public Radio, Public Radio International, and American Public Media.

Weisman has been a Fulbright Senior Scholar (in Colombia), the John Farrar Fellow in Nonfiction at the Bread Loaf Writers' Conference, and a contributing editor to the Los Angeles Times Magazine. Among his radio awards shared with his Homelands colleagues are a Robert F. Kennedy Citation, the Harry Chapin/World Hunger Year Award, and Brazil's Prèmio Nacional de Jornalismo Radiofônico. He also received a Four Corners Award for Best Nonfiction Book for La Frontera, a Los Angeles Press Club Award for Best Feature Story, and a Best of the West Award in Journalism. His book Gaviotas was awarded the 1998 Social Inventions Award from the London-based Global Ideas Bank. He has taught writing and journalism at Prescott College, Williams College, and at the University of Arizona. He and his wife, sculptor Beckie Kravetz, live in western Massachusetts.
Mar 06 2015 · 54mins
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Special Encore Presentation: Countdown, a new book by Alan Weisman

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With a million more of us every 4½ days on a planet that's not getting any bigger, prospects for a sustainable human future seem ever more in doubt. Alan Weisman traveled to more than 20 countries to ask what experts agreed were the probably the most important questions on Earth-and also the hardest: How many humans can the planet hold without capsizing? How robust must the Earth's ecosystem be to assure our continued existence? Can we know which other species are essential to our survival? And, how might we actually arrive at a stable, optimum population, and design an economy to allow genuine prosperity without endless growth? Tune in as we talk with Alan about what he encountered on his global search for answers.
Jun 13 2014 · 57mins
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Special Encore Presentation: Countdown, a new book by Alan Weisman

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With a million more of us every 4½ days on a planet that's not getting any bigger, prospects for a sustainable human future seem ever more in doubt. Alan Weisman traveled to more than 20 countries to ask what experts agreed were the probably the most important questions on Earth-and also the hardest: How many humans can the planet hold without capsizing? How robust must the Earth's ecosystem be to assure our continued existence? Can we know which other species are essential to our survival? And, how might we actually arrive at a stable, optimum population, and design an economy to allow genuine prosperity without endless growth? Tune in as we talk with Alan about what he encountered on his global search for answers.
Apr 25 2014 · 57mins
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Countdown, a new book by Alan Weisman

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With a million more of us every 4½ days on a planet that's not getting any bigger, prospects for a sustainable human future seem ever more in doubt. Alan Weisman traveled to more than 20 countries to ask what experts agreed were the probably the most important questions on Earth-and also the hardest: How many humans can the planet hold without capsizing? How robust must the Earth's ecosystem be to assure our continued existence? Can we know which other species are essential to our survival? And, how might we actually arrive at a stable, optimum population, and design an economy to allow genuine prosperity without endless growth? Tune in as we talk with Alan about what he encountered on his global search for answers.
Mar 21 2014 · 57mins
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Free Forum Q&A: ALAN WEISMAN, Author of COUNTDOWN Slowing Population Growth Our Last, Best Hope for a Future on Earth

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Aired: 12/8/13 What do you think are the biggest solvable problems facing humanity? Justice and inequality? Violence and war? Climate change and pollution? Today we're going to focus on one that I believe underlies all of those: Population. The last book from today's guest, ALAN WEISMAN, was thought-provoking, award-winning, and best-selling. THE WORLD WITHOUT US, which was made into a powerful documentary, imagined what would happen to planet earth if humans disappeared. Our massive infrastructure would collapse and vanish without human presence, and nature would swiftly begin to heal without our daily pressures. But, Weisman, would rather Imagine a successful world with us, and that led to his newest book, COUNTDOWN: OUR LAST, BEST HOPE FOR A FUTURE ON EARTH. For this one, he traveled to 21 countries asking politicians, scientists, family planning specialists, doctors, and religious leaders, crucial questions about how we can successfully deal with the size of human population.
Dec 10 2013 · 55mins
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Sustainability Segment: Alan Weisman

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Guest Alan Weisman speaks with Diane Horn about his most recent book, "Countdown: Our Last, Best Hope for a Future on Earth?"
Nov 11 2013 · 27mins
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