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Erik Dietrich

19 Podcast Episodes

Latest 28 Jan 2023 | Updated Daily

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Erik Dietrich — Avoiding the Trap of Expert Beginnerism

Tiny DevOps

Erik Dietrich is the author of "The Expert Beginner", which expands on the Dreyfus model of skill acquisition with the addition of the "Expert Beginner", one who stops learning, incorrectly believing they have achieved expert level.We discuss factors that lead to this phenomenon and how to detect it in yourself and overcome the trap if you've fallen victim.  Erik also discusses the types of organizations and management practices that promote this toxic persona.Resources:Book: The Expert Beginner Blog post: How Developers Stop Learning: Rise of the Expert BeginnerWikipedia: Dreyfus Model of Skill AcquisitionToday's GuestErik Dietrichhttps://daedtech.com/https://www.hitsubscribe.com/Watch this episode on YouTube.

30mins

13 Jul 2021

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Episode 202 – Stories about Software with Erik Dietrich

The 6 Figure Developer Podcast

Erik is CEO at Hit Subscribe, a unique marketing business that helps companies reach software engineers with content. Links https://twitter.com/daedtech https://www.linkedin.com/in/erik-dietrich-109a888/ https://www.amazon.com/Erik-Dietrich/e/B00J6314XY https://www.hitsubscribe.com/ https://daedtech.com/ “Tempting Time” by Animals As Leaders used with permissions – All Rights Reserved × Subscribe now! Never miss a post, subscribe to The 6 Figure Developer Podcast! Are you interested in being a guest on The 6 Figure Developer Podcast? Click here to check availability!

42mins

28 Jun 2021

Similar People

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How to Approach Legacy System Migration with Erik Dietrich

Coding Over Cocktails

DaedTech LLC founder and Hit Subscribe CEO and co-founder Erik Dietrich discusses how modern enterprises can innovate by giving more independence to software engineers and the challenges that companies are facing when they decide to undergo digital transformation.

34mins

8 Oct 2020

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Hillsborough Road the movie cast interview with Erik Dietrich, Andrew Sanders, and Allen Boatner

Something Something Podcast - A Creative Podcast

This week we talk with some of the cast of Hillsborough Road, Erik Dietrich,   Andrew Sanders, and Allen Boatner check out the Facebook Hillsborough Road Our stuff Our Stuff https://www.facebook.com/somethingsomethingpodcast/ https://www.patreon.com/join/somethingsomethingfilms? Get a free audiobook from Audible https://www.audible.com/ep/freetrial?source_code=PDTGBPD060314004R Erick's stuff https://twitter.com/erickaslov https://www.instagram.com/whoiserickkaslov/ https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCE6h5n-6fEGBMaVNVNv37CQ?disable_polymer=true https://www.twitch.tv/somethingaboutvideogames Larry's stuff https://twitter.com/LarrySands3 https://www.instagram.com/larrysands2/ Something Something stuff https://www.instagram.com/somethingsomethingpodcast/ https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdFxsEENQdcwQbIIQ9VFqzg/videos--- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/appSupport this podcast: https://anchor.fm/somethingsomethingpodcast/support

51mins

24 Sep 2020

Most Popular

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How writing code is hindering your career w/ Erik Dietrich

Production Ready

Erik's content agency: Hit Subscribe The Gervais Principle, part I, which includes an image of the MacLeod corporate hierarchy. The Dilbert Principle The Peter Principle How Developers Stop Learning: Rise of the Expert Beginner The Beggar CEO and Sucker CultureCheck out more of Erik's writing at his site Daedtech (one of my favorite tech blogs) and in his book, Developer Hegemony.

33mins

18 Aug 2020

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Erik Dietrich on The Hourly Monkey Wrench

Ditching Hourly

Erik Dietrich shares how he went from solo software consultant to productized service business owner (and how it throws a monkey wrench in the works when a contractor wants to be paid hourly).Erik's sites:https://daedtech.com/https://www.hitsubscribe.com/

39mins

18 Feb 2020

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MRS 061: Erik Dietrich

My Ruby Story

Panel: Charles Max WoodGuest: Erik DietrichThis week on My Ruby Story, Charles talks to Erik Dietrich who is a consultant and a business owner. After he left the IT life, he is a partner for a content marketing company among others.In particular, we dive pretty deep on:0:52 – Greetings! It’s another story on Ruby Stories.1:04 – We have had you on Episode 296.1:28 – Guest: I did in my blogger days, but over the course of time but I ran into management roles and then left. That definitely skewed my topics that I talked about.1:59 – Chuck: Introduce yourself for people. 2:53 – Chuck: Let’s talk about your career or even further back. How did you get into programming?3:24 – Guest: My father introduced me into my project. Into my educational background I do remember banging away at my computer because there weren’t any courses offered (at the time).4:13 – Chuck: Let’s talk about computer science.4:22 – guest: I had to apply to the computer science program to the college I went to. I knew I wanted to do something cutting-edge.4:42 – Chuck: After college where did you end up?4:55 – Guest: I graduated in 2001 from college. I did some odd jobs. Thankfully, the economy was stronger for me to be a software engineer title. Then from there...5:57 – Chuck: When I graduated I started off with Tech Support then Q/A.6:12 – Chuck: It sounds like you worked all over the place? Is it deliberate when you chance course within your career?6:36 – Guest: Actually, it was full circle for me. At some point, I did get more career-minded.8:01 – Chuck: How did you end up there – the programming job?8:13 – Guest: My mom left, but worked at X company. The co. knew that she had a son that finished a computer science degree.9:10 – Chuck: The recruiters should be use to that at some point.9:23 – Guest added some more thoughts.9:50 – Chuck: Talk about the progression you’ve made. I know Ruby is not your primary focus of your background. Take people on a tour. I’m curious if we can talk about how you got into the consulting and marketing roles that you fill these days.10:28 – Guest: Whistle stop of my career, here we go. The first 10 years, it was pretty standard. Across a few different companies went from one position to another up to the architectural role. Then, I went through job-hopping. I ended up doing independent consulting and freelance works. I didn’t know really, though, what I wanted to do. Coaching people is what I did for a while. There I discovered something – I enjoyed that coaching work. More opportunities that I had, and then I realized it was a good fit. Over the course of time, I had the blog, which was reflecting anything I was doing. If I am writing about x, y, z, I was blogging about it.14:28 – Chuck: How do you know which opportunity to pursue?14:38 – Guest: General, I was say...15:52 – Chuck: What are you most proud of?16:04 – Guest: The blog.17:28 – Guest: My book. Check it out. Amazon and Leanpub.17:47 – Chuck: What are you working on now?17:58 – Guest answers this question.21:12 – Chuck: Any other thing you’d like to talk about?21:27 – Guest chimes in with his ideas.24:25 – Guest: Whatever adds to your happiness.24:36 – Chuck: I get to choose what I want to work on. I find that the freer that I am to make my own decisions the happier I am.25:09 – Guest: I had a hard time being told to do things from senior roles in the job.25:42 – Chuck: I think more companies will be willing to bring some people in for a specific project/job.26:39 – Guest: I get into trend projection into my book.28:04 – Chuck: One more question that I have. As people are coming into this pool – what do you advise those people to see where the industry is going? Where to get a job? Long-term?28:35 – Guest: To get a job in the entry level is kind of hustling. If you are struggling then write about a blog. Get there a social profile that makes you different from all the others. Does the company have the faintest idea of who you are and what you can do? Position yourself as an expert. If you can show that you are standing out from your peers then your career will advance much more quickly. Not necessarily being “better then them.” How are you different?30:23 – Chuck: Yep, these things I push people toward in my new course. Meet the right people; build those relationships. They probably get dozens or dozens of applications. They can find someone to write code but it’s the underlining stuff that they are looking for.31:44 – Advertisement32:26 – Picks!Links: Ruby Elixir Chuck’s Twitter Ribbon Farm Hit Subscribe Erik Dietrich’s Book on Amazon Erik Dietrich’s Book on Leanpub Erik Dietrich’s Twitter Erik Dietrich’s GitHub DaedTech Sponsors: Code Badges Get a Coder Job Picks:Charles Audible AirPods Ketogenic Jamie 4-Hour Work Week Ribbon Farm Hit Subscribe – Apply to be an Author!

36mins

19 Sep 2018

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MRS 061: Erik Dietrich

Devchat.tv Episode Roundup

Panel: Charles Max Wood Guest: Erik Dietrich This week on My Ruby Story, Charles talks to Erik Dietrich who is a consultant and a business owner. After he left the IT life, he is a partner for a content marketing company among others. In particular, we dive pretty deep on: 0:52 – Greetings! It’s another story on Ruby Stories. 1:04 – We have had you on Episode 296. 1:28 – Guest: I did in my blogger days, but over the course of time but I ran into management roles and then left. That definitely skewed my topics that I talked about. 1:59 – Chuck: Introduce yourself for people.  2:53 – Chuck: Let’s talk about your career or even further back. How did you get into programming? 3:24 – Guest: My father introduced me into my project. Into my educational background I do remember banging away at my computer because there weren’t any courses offered (at the time). 4:13 – Chuck: Let’s talk about computer science. 4:22 – guest: I had to apply to the computer science program to the college I went to. I knew I wanted to do something cutting-edge. 4:42 – Chuck: After college where did you end up? 4:55 – Guest: I graduated in 2001 from college. I did some odd jobs. Thankfully, the economy was stronger for me to be a software engineer title. Then from there... 5:57 – Chuck: When I graduated I started off with Tech Support then Q/A. 6:12 – Chuck: It sounds like you worked all over the place? Is it deliberate when you chance course within your career? 6:36 – Guest: Actually, it was full circle for me. At some point, I did get more career-minded. 8:01 – Chuck: How did you end up there – the programming job? 8:13 – Guest: My mom left, but worked at X company. The co. knew that she had a son that finished a computer science degree. 9:10 – Chuck: The recruiters should be use to that at some point. 9:23 – Guest added some more thoughts. 9:50 – Chuck: Talk about the progression you’ve made. I know Ruby is not your primary focus of your background. Take people on a tour. I’m curious if we can talk about how you got into the consulting and marketing roles that you fill these days. 10:28 – Guest: Whistle stop of my career, here we go. The first 10 years, it was pretty standard. Across a few different companies went from one position to another up to the architectural role. Then, I went through job-hopping. I ended up doing independent consulting and freelance works. I didn’t know really, though, what I wanted to do. Coaching people is what I did for a while. There I discovered something – I enjoyed that coaching work. More opportunities that I had, and then I realized it was a good fit. Over the course of time, I had the blog, which was reflecting anything I was doing. If I am writing about x, y, z, I was blogging about it. 14:28 – Chuck: How do you know which opportunity to pursue? 14:38 – Guest: General, I was say... 15:52 – Chuck: What are you most proud of? 16:04 – Guest: The blog. 17:28 – Guest: My book. Check it out. Amazon and Leanpub. 17:47 – Chuck: What are you working on now? 17:58 – Guest answers this question. 21:12 – Chuck: Any other thing you’d like to talk about? 21:27 – Guest chimes in with his ideas. 24:25 – Guest: Whatever adds to your happiness. 24:36 – Chuck: I get to choose what I want to work on. I find that the freer that I am to make my own decisions the happier I am. 25:09 – Guest: I had a hard time being told to do things from senior roles in the job. 25:42 – Chuck: I think more companies will be willing to bring some people in for a specific project/job. 26:39 – Guest: I get into trend projection into my book. 28:04 – Chuck: One more question that I have. As people are coming into this pool – what do you advise those people to see where the industry is going? Where to get a job? Long-term? 28:35 – Guest: To get a job in the entry level is kind of hustling. If you are struggling then write about a blog. Get there a social profile that makes you different from all the others. Does the company have the faintest idea of who you are and what you can do? Position yourself as an expert. If you can show that you are standing out from your peers then your career will advance much more quickly. Not necessarily being “better then them.” How are you different? 30:23 – Chuck: Yep, these things I push people toward in my new course. Meet the right people; build those relationships. They probably get dozens or dozens of applications. They can find someone to write code but it’s the underlining stuff that they are looking for. 31:44 – Advertisement 32:26 – Picks! Links: Ruby Elixir Chuck’s Twitter Ribbon Farm Hit Subscribe Erik Dietrich’s Book on Amazon Erik Dietrich’s Book on Leanpub Erik Dietrich’s Twitter Erik Dietrich’s GitHub DaedTech Sponsors: Code Badges Get a Coder Job Picks: Charles Audible AirPods Ketogenic Jamie 4-Hour Work Week Ribbon Farm Hit Subscribe – Apply to be an Author!

34mins

19 Sep 2018

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MRS 061: Erik Dietrich

Ruby Rogues

Panel: Charles Max Wood Guest: Erik Dietrich This week on My Ruby Story, Charles talks to Erik Dietrich who is a consultant and a business owner. After he left the IT life, he is a partner for a content marketing company among others. In particular, we dive pretty deep on: 0:52 – Greetings! It’s another story on Ruby Stories. 1:04 – We have had you on Episode 296. 1:28 – Guest: I did in my blogger days, but over the course of time but I ran into management roles and then left. That definitely skewed my topics that I talked about. 1:59 – Chuck: Introduce yourself for people.  2:53 – Chuck: Let’s talk about your career or even further back. How did you get into programming? 3:24 – Guest: My father introduced me into my project. Into my educational background I do remember banging away at my computer because there weren’t any courses offered (at the time). 4:13 – Chuck: Let’s talk about computer science. 4:22 – guest: I had to apply to the computer science program to the college I went to. I knew I wanted to do something cutting-edge. 4:42 – Chuck: After college where did you end up? 4:55 – Guest: I graduated in 2001 from college. I did some odd jobs. Thankfully, the economy was stronger for me to be a software engineer title. Then from there... 5:57 – Chuck: When I graduated I started off with Tech Support then Q/A. 6:12 – Chuck: It sounds like you worked all over the place? Is it deliberate when you chance course within your career? 6:36 – Guest: Actually, it was full circle for me. At some point, I did get more career-minded. 8:01 – Chuck: How did you end up there – the programming job? 8:13 – Guest: My mom left, but worked at X company. The co. knew that she had a son that finished a computer science degree. 9:10 – Chuck: The recruiters should be use to that at some point. 9:23 – Guest added some more thoughts. 9:50 – Chuck: Talk about the progression you’ve made. I know Ruby is not your primary focus of your background. Take people on a tour. I’m curious if we can talk about how you got into the consulting and marketing roles that you fill these days. 10:28 – Guest: Whistle stop of my career, here we go. The first 10 years, it was pretty standard. Across a few different companies went from one position to another up to the architectural role. Then, I went through job-hopping. I ended up doing independent consulting and freelance works. I didn’t know really, though, what I wanted to do. Coaching people is what I did for a while. There I discovered something – I enjoyed that coaching work. More opportunities that I had, and then I realized it was a good fit. Over the course of time, I had the blog, which was reflecting anything I was doing. If I am writing about x, y, z, I was blogging about it. 14:28 – Chuck: How do you know which opportunity to pursue? 14:38 – Guest: General, I was say... 15:52 – Chuck: What are you most proud of? 16:04 – Guest: The blog. 17:28 – Guest: My book. Check it out. Amazon and Leanpub. 17:47 – Chuck: What are you working on now? 17:58 – Guest answers this question. 21:12 – Chuck: Any other thing you’d like to talk about? 21:27 – Guest chimes in with his ideas. 24:25 – Guest: Whatever adds to your happiness. 24:36 – Chuck: I get to choose what I want to work on. I find that the freer that I am to make my own decisions the happier I am. 25:09 – Guest: I had a hard time being told to do things from senior roles in the job. 25:42 – Chuck: I think more companies will be willing to bring some people in for a specific project/job. 26:39 – Guest: I get into trend projection into my book. 28:04 – Chuck: One more question that I have. As people are coming into this pool – what do you advise those people to see where the industry is going? Where to get a job? Long-term? 28:35 – Guest: To get a job in the entry level is kind of hustling. If you are struggling then write about a blog. Get there a social profile that makes you different from all the others. Does the company have the faintest idea of who you are and what you can do? Position yourself as an expert. If you can show that you are standing out from your peers then your career will advance much more quickly. Not necessarily being “better then them.” How are you different? 30:23 – Chuck: Yep, these things I push people toward in my new course. Meet the right people; build those relationships. They probably get dozens or dozens of applications. They can find someone to write code but it’s the underlining stuff that they are looking for. 31:44 – Advertisement 32:26 – Picks! Links: Ruby Elixir Chuck’s Twitter Ribbon Farm Hit Subscribe Erik Dietrich’s Book on Amazon Erik Dietrich’s Book on Leanpub Erik Dietrich’s Twitter Erik Dietrich’s GitHub DaedTech Sponsors: Code Badges Get a Coder Job Picks: Charles Audible AirPods Ketogenic Jamie 4-Hour Work Week Ribbon Farm Hit Subscribe – Apply to be an Author!

34mins

19 Sep 2018

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FS 295: Erik Dietrich on the Future of Labor

Devchat.tv Episode Roundup

Panel: Reuven Lerner Jonathan Stark Jeremy Green Special Guest: Erik Dietrich In this episode of the Freelancer’s Show, the panelist and guest Eric Dietrich discuss “Future of Labor.” Erik is a software developer, was an executive a software company, but turn to consulting for a number of years. Currently, Erik runs a digital content marketing agency and still does consulting. Erik is the author of a number of developer-related books, including Developer Hegemony: The Future of Labor, which is the basis of today’s episode topic. In particular, we dive pretty deep on: Demands for software Labor vs. Knowledge work Software architects to Developer Law firm agency, apprenticeship Leaving big companies Giving up on staffing IT, etc. Outsourcing History of corporation Just sitting in your basement and code… Business skills  - Being an entrepreneur, not an employee What should a developer do to take advantage of this? Start to understand the  fundamentals of a business Maintenance work vs. designing the future UpWork -  and commodity labor Transferable skills Trends for Freelancers Becoming business savvy, entrepreneurial And much more!      Links https://github.com/erikdietrich https://www.linkedin.com/in/erik-dietrich-109a888/ https://www.amazon.com/Erik-Dietrich/e/B00J6314XY= @daedtech Picks Reuven Lerner Slow Burn Podcast Jonathan Stark Dyson V8 Value Pricing BootCamp Jeremy Green Increase Your Consulting Fees Increase Your Consulting Fees Erik Dietrich Developer Hegemony Post Scan Mail

58mins

3 May 2018

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