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Elvis Costello Podcasts

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41 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Elvis Costello. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Elvis Costello, often where they are interviewed.

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41 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Elvis Costello. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Elvis Costello, often where they are interviewed.

Updated daily with the latest episodes

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Elvis Costello

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Nihal chats to Elvis about his new album Hey, Clockface.
Nov 10 2020 · 44mins
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Ep. 153 - ELVIS COSTELLO ("Everyday I Write the Book")

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PART ONE
Scott and Paul talk about their friends at Pearl Snap Studios and pinch themselves over having the opportunity to talk with Elvis Costello.

PART TWO
Elvis Costello discusses his new album Hey Clockface and talks about the record that set him on his musical journey; why he still likes writing in a notebook; the reason he resists the urge to go to an instrument too soon when he gets a melodic idea; the songwriting question he asked Bob Dylan; why he thinks he’s missed out on some cover songs; how he knows when a song is finished; the track on his new album that represents a songwriting “first” for him; his experiences in the studio with a gun-toting producer; and what he learned about the marriage of lyrics and melody from his co-writing relationships with Paul McCartney and Burt Bacharach. 

ABOUT ELVIS COSTELLO
Released between 1977 and 1979, Elvis Costello’s first three albums—My Aim is True, This Year’s Model, and Armed Forces—were all included in Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 500 Greatest Albums of All Time. That early period of his recording career yielded now-classic singles such as “Alison,” “Watching the Detectives,” “Pump it Up,” “Radio Radio,” “Oliver’s Army,” “Accidents Will Happen,” and others.

Though he established his career as a rock artist and reached commercial heights in the US with the pop hit “Everyday I Write the Book,” Costello’s more than thirty studio albums cover a breathtaking range of stylistic ground, from Almost Blue, his early 1980s album of country covers, to The Juliet Letters, his 1993 collaboration with The Brodsky Quartet, to North, an album of ballads partially inspired by his wife Diana Krall that topped Billboard’s Jazz chart in 2003, to Il Sogno, his first full-length orchestral work, which was performed by the London Symphony Orchestra, and topped Billboard’s classical chart in 2004, to Wise Up Ghost, a 2013 collaboration with Questlove and The Roots. In between, he’s continued to release albums both solo and with his bands The Attractions, The Imposters, and The Sugarcanes. 

Always an adventurous collaborator, Costello entered into a fruitful songwriting partnership with Paul McCartney that yielded more than a dozen songs, including Costello’s Top 10 single “Veronica” and McCartney’s “My Brave Face.” He went on to release entire collaborative albums with Richard Harvey, Burt Bacharach, Allen Toussaint, and others. He has written lyrics for compositions by Charles Mingus, Billy Strayhorn and Oscar Peterson, as well as musical settings for lyrics by Johnny Cash, and Bob Dylan. His songs have been covered by a range of artists including George Jones, Chet Baker, Dusty Springfield, and Solomon Burke. 

Costello has been nominated for fourteen Grammy awards, two of which he won, as well as an Academy Award for co-writing “The Scarlet Tide” with T-Bone Burnett for the film Cold Mountain. He has received two Ivor Novello awards for Songwriting, the Americana Association’s Lifetime Achievement in Songwriting award, and the ASCAP Founder’s Award, which was presented by Burt Bacharach. He was inducted into both the Songwriters Hall of Fame and the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, and was named one of the 100 Greatest Songwriters of All Time by Rolling Stone magazine. His genre-stretching new album, Hey Clockface, was recorded in Helsinki and Paris, and was released on October 30. 

 

Nov 10 2020 · 1hr 32mins

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Elvis Costello - 11/03/20

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Elvis Costello on how he’s processing and writing about this moment in time.

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Nov 03 2020 · 1hr 11mins
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Rock's Backpages Ep.86: Loraine Alterman on Detroit + Stevie Wonder + Elvis Costello

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In this episode, Barney, Mark & Jasper welcome the great Loraine Alterman — live from New York City! — to reminisce about her journey from '60s "Teen Beat" reporter on the Detroit Free Press to co-producer of a new Broadway show about Motown stars the Temptations. Along the way we also hear about New York's Fillmore and Apollo theatres — and how John Lennon came to be Best Man at her wedding to actor Peter Boyle. Then we head back to the Motor City to discuss the genius of Stevie Wonder as he morphed from '60s Motown prodigy to '70s Moog magician.

After paying their respects to the late Spencer Davis – the R&B "professor" who launched the superhuman lungs of 16-year-old Stevie Winwood on the world — your hosts and their guest hear the first of three clips from a compelling audio interview with Elvis Costello, mainly (but not exclusively) telling Adam Sweeting about his 1995 covers album Kojak Variety. Discussion of pop's own Mr. Eclectic ensues before Mr. Pringle talks us through his favourite new additions to the ever-expanding RBP library — including interviews with Brian Jones, Robert Wyatt, Grace Jones … and mall-pop princess Debbie Gibson. Barney cites a prescient 2014 interview about racism and Confederate flags with Lynyrd Skynyrd's Rickey Medlocke, and Jasper wraps matters up with reflections on Jason Donovan and D'Angelo

Many thanks to special guest Loraine Alterman. For more information about the International Myeloma Foundation’s Annual Comedy Celebration, please visit comedy.myeloma.org.

Pieces discussed: MC-5, Smokey Robinson, Apollo Theatre vs Fillmore East, John Lennon, Stevie Wonder, Stevie Wonderer, Stevie Wonderest, Spencer Davis Group, Spencerer Davis Group, Spencest Davis Group, Elvis Costello audio, Brian Jones, Soul, Soft Machine, Funkadelic, J. J. Cale, Grace Jones, Debbie Gibson, New Order, Lauryn Hill, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Jason Donovan, D'Angelo's Black Messiah and Parody in Popular Music.

This show is part of the Pantheon Podcast Network.

Oct 27 2020 · 1hr 18mins
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Elvis Costello and Mohammad-Reza Shajarian

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Elvis Costello's latest via Helsinki, Paris and New York is called 'Hey Clockface'. And remembering the late Mohammad-Reza Shajarian, who some people think is the most important Iranian singer of the last century
Oct 17 2020 · 54mins
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4.2: Elvis Costello and the Attractions - All This Useless Beauty (1996)

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The end of a road can take on many different forms. Sometimes, the road branches off in two or more directions. Sometimes, it’s a dead end. At other times, that road is shrouded in mist with no road signs to indicate what’s ahead. In any of these situations, you have to decide on what to do next to the best of your ability. At the end of his university career, Rob faced the end of a road, and the end of an era while the way forward became suddenly uncertain. During that time, Elvis Costello and the Attractions’ 1996 record All This Useless Beauty was his soundtrack, an album replete with tales of uncertainty, ambiguity, disappointment, and complicated shadows to say the least. How did this inform his perspective at the time? What does he and the rest of the Deeper Cuts trio make of the album all these years later? Join us for our second episode in our fourth season to discover whether it’s beauty resonated or turned out to be useless after all.

Our Spotify Playlist will have the albums we're looking at this season, along with the songs from our COVID Sessions earlier this year.

Sep 29 2020 · 52mins
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Guest: Bruce Thomas, bassist of Elvis Costello & The Attractions from Aug 15, 2020

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Bruce Thomas - "Interview"
Elvis Costello And The Attractions - "Lipstick Vogue" https://www.wfmu.org/playlists/shows/95655
Aug 15 2020 · 1hr 43mins
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Elvis Costello. The Music That Made Me Want To Make Music. 2002.

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This is the master tape of a radio interview I did with Costello in 2002 to mark the release of his album When I Was Cruel. During the show, you can hear that I was fazed somewhat by addressing the man as "Elvis!" But, we did talk about why he took Presley's name. Not only that, for the only time I am aware of Costello gave his opinion of the artistry of Elvis Presley.  He also discusses his early love of Motown, The Mamas and Papas, Small Faces and finally, of course,  his latest album. This is a must, as they say, for all fans of Costello. 

Jul 31 2020 · 37mins
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(EP 8, no.3) Elvis Costello & The Attractions w/The Battered Wives: This Year’s Model, Alumni Hall, UWO, London, Ontario, Canada, Monday Nov. 6, 1978

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It’s six months on from the Bob Seger concert in Episode 7, and my world had fully transformed.  The old wave was (mostly) banished from my turntable by this point as I completely surrendered to the electrifying bang of punk which was delivering an exciting and ear/eye/mind-opening flood of completely new sounds, triggering several unprecedented years of relentlessly morphing sonic innovations and hand grenades.  

While I had followed the development of the US, and then UK, punk/new wave scenes through the press, starting in the mid-70s with Patti Smith and the Ramones, it wasn’t until 1977 that I finally really got to hear a substantial amount of this music. 

This Elvis Costello show from 1978—my third live rock concert—was my first direct interface with any of the new artists, and I was eager to jump into the fray.  And while this show’s energy was high, and I was thrilled to have finally seen one of the new breed of acts I was playing relentlessly at home, there was something about this show that left me unsatisfied. 

My old pal from the 70s—who I will call “Autobahn”—attended this gig with me along with my siblings, and he drops by the podcast to share his thoughts and memories about the concert.  This was his very first show and he has some interesting and different perspectives on the gig than moi. 

Tune in for anticipated bedlam, herbal dental remedies, & Biff’n’Buffy rent-a-cops. 

Also tune in to hear me get the title of Costello’s 1983 album (Punch the Clock) wrong.

 Read the original 2010 blog post here.

NEXT PODCAST:  Since the Covid Summer of 2020 is also The Summer Without Live Music, I am going to pause my story and instead present two episodes devoted to performances that were missed rather than remembering those I attended.

In Episode 9 (no.020b) Waiting in Vain: 20 + 2 Performances I Missed (1980-2020), I reflect on a rich 40 years of Not attending gigs or sets.  Join me in a heartwarming look back at cancelled shows and tours, student penury, inclement weather, mystery no-shows, limited mobility options, instant sell-outs, undersold annulments, competing options and obligations, and sometimes just being a lazy bugger.

Episode 10 will recall at the 20 Acts from the Past I Wish I’d Seen, while Episode 11 will look back at the 40th Anniversary of the Heatwave Festival outside of Barrie, Ontario (April 23, 2020).

EP 9 (no.020b) Waiting in Vain: 20 Performances I Missed + 2 1980-2020 (Get a sneak preview by reading the original 2012 blog entry here.)

Coming in September -> EP 9 (no.004) 

Jul 03 2020 · 51mins
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Elvis Costello - This Year's Model

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In the first installment of our three episode look into the British New Wave movement of the late '70s we review the second album by Elvis Costello "This Year's Model" and also discuss the scene in Britain that his music came from.

Jul 03 2020 · 1hr 3mins
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