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John Chisholm

20 Podcast Episodes

Latest 28 Aug 2021 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

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How Startups and Innovation Benefit from Preserving Employment Freedom for Independent Workers - with John Chisholm

Policy-ish Talk

The modern workforce is changing. Technology is making it easier for people of all education, skills, and income levels to be part of the sharing economy as independent contractors. Yet, several regulatory and legislative initiatives expose the long-term viability of this working arrangement and the benefits it provides. In this episode, John Chisholm, entrepreneur, CEO, and investor, shares his perspectives on how essential independent contractors are for startups and innovation and how the current legislative and regulatory actions affect the innovation climate.

19mins

20 Jul 2021

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Episode 212 – Defining your success both in law and in life with with John Chisholm

The Happy Lawyer Happy Life Podcast

In this week’s episode of the ‘Happy Lawyer Happy Life Podcast’ I had the pleasure of interviewing the wonderful John Chisholm. John aptly describes himself these days as a ‘recovering lawyer’ but I soon came to learn that his passion for the profession is deeply ingrained.  John is a third generation lawyer, and you might say followed a family legacy that has been built across 60 years and started with John’s Grandfather at the firm Maddocks.  It is clear that John has achieved incredible success in his career in law- from Articled Clerk to Managing Partner at one of the country’s largest firms but it was John’s definition of and perspective on the concept of success that had me intrigued in this conversation. John left private practice in 2004 and since that time has been consulting to firms all around the world and is a leader in law firm innovation.  John’s passion for abolishing the billable hour, rethinking the markers of success in law businesses and building a sustainable future for lawyers has driven his career this past decade and I can personally say his influence on so many of us who are following in his footsteps will mean that his legacy will live for many decades to come. And I would call John a happy lawyer- even if it hasn’t always been that way- and I suspect is has been his wife, family and health that keep him that way. In this interview, John and I also chatted about- If John was not a lawyer he would have been an artist. Creativity, the law and the benefits creative activities have on our mental wellbeing. John grew up in Victoria, as the eldest of 4 boys, with a father who was a second-generation lawyer. John’s journey into law and how becoming an articled clerk in his father’s firm influenced his career. Law firm Maddocks in the 1970s, and how it has changed over the past 40 years. John shares his broader definition of success in the law. John’s experience of the technological changes  on the legal profession across his career. The drivers of change in law and how busyness and technological changes have impacted the wellbeing of lawyers. Gender and opportunities previously held in the law and the barriers which have been broken. Multi-disciplinary law and our client’s perspective of the profession. The role of non-lawyers in law firms. The highlights of John’s 9 years as a managing partner at Maddocks at the beginning of his career. John describes himself as a ‘recovering lawyer’ and his choice to step away in 2005 to find clarity in life. How John fell into the world of consulting and why he made this shift within the legal space. Value pricing and John’s passion for this style of billing and how it led into his full-time career. A whole of business shift is required to move away from the billable hour. Profitability and the perception of profit and success. John’s mentors and their influence on how John saw success as a lawyer and a person. The benchmark of success, comparisons and competition between legal firms. John’s tips for lawyers stepping into the law and how to find fulfilment in their careers. To be a great lawyer you need to enjoy life and John shares his life outside the law. The positive life changes that COVID has had on John’s life, (and mine!). John share the importance of boundaries. And finally, John refers us to Ralph Waldo Emerson’s definition of success: “To laugh often and much; to win the respect of intelligent people and the affection of children; … to appreciate beauty, to find the best in others; to leave the world a little better; whether by a healthy child or a garden patch … to know even one life has breathed easier because you have lived. This is success.” Sit back and enjoy this interview with John Chisholm. *** Learn more here about upcoming events and courses and connect with Clarissa Rayward at the ‘Happy Lawyer Happy Life’ knowledge centre-  A community for lawyers who want to make the best out of their life in and outside of the law.    Listen to last week’s episode here The post Episode 212 – Defining your success both in law and in life with with John Chisholm appeared first on The Happy Family Lawyer.

1hr 10mins

28 Apr 2021

Similar People

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Unleash Your Inner Company - John Chisholm - Profit Talks #07

Profit Talks

John Chisholm is a technology entrepreneur and angel investor in the Silicon Valley. He founded the online software companies Decisive Technology, now a part of Google, and Customer Sat, now part of Confirmit. He is a trustee of MIT and the Santa Fe Institute, and past President and Chair of the worldwide MIT Alumni Association. He is also an advisor of Hayek Global College. We talk about John´s greatest challenge in life which was leading his tech company through the dot.com bust crisis, about how passion and perseverance work together to develop entrepreneurship, how discovering a customer´s goal is more important than listening to him, how you should never verbalize on your weaknesses and much more! John´s book, Unleash Your Inner Company, is rated very highly in Amazon: https://www.amazon.com./Unleash-Your-Inner-Company Check out our courses: https://www.hayekcollege.com/courses Follow our social networks: Telegram https://t.me/hayekcollege Whatsapp https://bit.ly/hayekwhats Instagram https://www.instagram.com/hayekcollege/ Facebook https://www.facebook.com/HayekCollege LinkedIn

54mins

19 Nov 2020

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E6: Beyond the Billable Hour - John Chisholm, Former CEO of Maddox, Middletons and Co-Founder of Innovim Group

The Leading Lawyer Project with Sam Burrett

Is there a better way to run law firms? How can we deliver more value to our clients without being trapped by timekeeping? How can we create happier clients and more profitable firms? These are some of the questions that John Chisholm, a former lawyer and leader of law firms, has been working on for the last decade and a half. John has consulted with some of Australia's most innovative law firms and authored thought-leadership about pricing that has changed the way many firms operate.In this episode of the Leading Lawyer Project we cover:John's journey from the son of a lawyer to Managing Partner of a law firm;The differences between lawyers of the '70s, '80s, 90s and now;Becoming a leader of lawyers vs being a lawyer;The key skillsets for managing lawyers (hint - it's not an MBA);Leaving the law...and returning;Importing ideas from other organizations and industries into law firms;The ethics of the billable hour;Inefficiencies in hourly billing;OldLaw and NewLawThe most inspiring NewLaw leaders;What young lawyers can do to contribute to the future of law.You can find more about John here:The Innovim website;The John Chisholm Consulting WebsiteJohn's LinkedIn profileOther links:I'd love if you could leave a review and a rating wherever you listen to your podcasts! It makes a huge difference and helps people find the show.Subscribe to The Leading Lawyer Project on iTunesConnect with me on LinkedIn Have an idea for the podcast, a guest you'd love to hear from, or an idea for me to explore? Drop me a line here: burrett.sam@gmail.com

46mins

20 Jul 2020

Most Popular

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Managing Working Relationships with John Chisholm (Ep. 104)

On Fire with Linda Fields

Don't you just love difficult conversations?... Me neither!! Thankfully we have my good friend John Chisholm with the insight that God has downloaded in him to help us discover the principles of how to have successful, "difficult" conversations. This is part of being a Spiritual Professional! Learn more about John Chisholm at his website www.johnchisholm.com Find his book in the Forerunner Bookstore website, or stop by the store if you're in the Kansas City area!

17mins

28 May 2020

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How do I know what to charge? A pricing Q&A with John Chisholm (ep 38)

Doing Law Differently

Back in episode 32 (before the coronacrisis hit!) I spoke about the what, why and how of fixed and value pricing. That episode was so popular that it sent the podcast back into the top 10 of the Apple Podcast charts!  I put out a call for your questions on all things pricing and in this episode I’m tackling those questions along with pricing expert, John Chisholm.  From understanding value and working out what to charge to measuring staff performance, we’ve got all your FAQs covered! John Chisholm describes himself as a “recovering lawyer”. He’s spent the last 15 years urging lawyers not only to stop billing their services by time, but to also burn their timesheets. He works with professionals to assist them with a mindset change and the practical implementation of value-based pricing.   John is a Senior Fellow at the VeraSage institute, and co-founder of The Innovim Group, an organisation which runs aligned pricing programs and helps firms with their pricing transformation.  Here’s the questions we tackle:  2:56 John’s view on fixed pricing: yes or no? 4:53 What is menu pricing? 5:53 How do I work out the value of my service? 8:10 What kind of questions should we ask to understand value from the client’s perspective? 11:58 How do you decide the price? 15:00 Can or should we still record time? 18:54 How do you know breakeven? 22:55 How do you avoid falling back to calculating by hours worked? 26:25 What KPIs do firms track to work out employee bonuses if they’re not tracking time? 28:08 Can you offer both fixed and timed pricing? 22:54 For standardised services, should law firms put prices up on their websites? 37:48 When you commit to value pricing what other areas of your business also change? Thanks to Legalite! This episode is brought to you by Legalite Horizons, a new model giving principal-level lawyers the platform to grow their practice while being fully supported.  Join a recognised, award-winning law firm with access to infrastructure and support. Best of all, you’ll get to keep the lions share of what you bill and enjoy complete freedom to run your practice the way you want. Find out more here or listen back to episode 24 with Marianne Marchesi here.  Links Listen back to episode 32 – The what, why and how of fixed and value pricing Download your copy of my new e-book, 80 tips to make your law firm survive and thriveConnect with John Chisolm via LinkedIn, The Innovim Group and VeraSage InstituteSubscribe to Doing Law Differently on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts or SpotifyConnect with me on LinkedInAre you keen to share how you’re Doing Law Differently? Get in touch here. The post How do I know what to charge? A pricing Q&A with John Chisholm (ep 38) appeared first on Lucy Dickens.

44mins

20 Apr 2020

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John Chisholm: “We laid off 40% of the company I’d spent the last three years of my life building”

How I Got Here

In this episode, we spoke with John Chisholm, serial entrepreneur, angel investor, and author of Unleash Your Inner Company: Use Passion and Perseverance to Build Your Ideal Business. John tells us about how an early setback in his career,  getting fired from his job, eventually led him to build and grow a company that is part of Google today. He also describes how he persevered through the dotcom bust, taking a $300,000 personal loan and putting his house as collateral to keep his company afloat.--- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/howigothere/support

23mins

5 Mar 2020

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John Chisholm: The Tools and Techniques for Success in the Entrepreneurial Process

Economics For Business

John Chisholm is the author of Unleash Your Inner Company: Use Passion And Perseverance To Build Your Ideal Business. Entrepreneurship is a process. Taking this view enables successful navigation over time, whatever the interim ups and downs. Sometimes the process can feel like stumbling through a jungle, tripping over rocks and vines, always picking yourself up again and marching onwards. Don’t expect the process map you start with to be the one you continue with. Don’t plan too far ahead. Do be adaptive. Nonetheless, the process view is a source of support during the journey.Key Takeaways and Actionable InsightsProcesses require operating tools. John Chisholm’s toolset starts at Need and Advantage. “All you need is a Need and Advantage.” Need = "A real, unsatisfied customer need in an area about which you are passionate." He defines Need in an Austrian way: a subjective value sought or anticipated by a customer. He defines Customer as a living breathing person (or group of people, as with a corporate customer) rather than an abstract “market need”. Unsatisfied means that the need is not addressed by currently available products and services (requiring the entrepreneur to understand customer dissatisfaction). And Real means shared by a sufficient number of customers or sufficiently intense in one or more customers to make it worthy of you to satisfy. The entrepreneur must have an advantage for satisfying that need. John’s process is aimed at establishing and extending that advantage, in spite of the fact that existing businesses will have more and better resources than you. John offers a 10-step process for entrepreneurs to follow. You’ll find John’s process pretty complete, cogent, and consistent with Austrianism. We didn’t cover every step of the process in the podcast, but we did pick out two tools and one principle. Make a STARS inventory of your resources and strengths and turn them to your advantage. John recommends making and continuously updating an inventory of your individual strengths. The STARS acronym stands for Skills, Technologies that you know and can use, Assets and Achievements, Relationships and Reputation, and Inner Strengths. He has wise advice on each one of these subjects, and he suggests multiple uses for the completed STARS inventory:Use it to assess the fit of your strengths with the customer needs you have identified.Use it to identify strengths gaps you’ll need to fill.Use it to build your own self-confidence (most people under-estimate their own strengths).Use it to innovate by making new combinations by pairing STARS elements in new ways.We provide a template with directional examples a Mises.orgE4E_47_PDF1. Map out a logical and sequential growth path with John’s “bowling pins” methodology. John’s advice is to avoid tackling too large a market and too large a target customer group at the outset. Focus on a best fit intersection between your resources and customer needs. Label it. Then identify the next most logical adjacent customer need you can fill, ideally leveraging your learning from the first market. Keep on building up the map of adjacent needs to fill. When you’ve got to 10, think of them as bowling pins. Knock them down one by one, starting with the first — that’s your early focus — and ultimately completing them all. That’s your vision — the largest set of customer needs you can possibly fill. John calls this process Upsizing A Customer Need, and notes that this bowling pin strategy is particularly persuasive to venture capitalists — they like it that you are focused, and also that you have a map to growth. We reproduce John’s bowling pin map at Mises.org/E4E_47_PDF2. Make the most of limited resources: Different is better than better. How do you overcome the fact that existing businesses in a market you are trying to enter have greater resources than you? John’s answer: focus on being different rather than better. If you can identify how to be different — with a different solution, for a different target audience (even if it is small to begin with) you’ll evade competition. John has additional advice about scalability, network effects, partnering and other tools for growth. Listen to the complete podcast for a rich reward of process tools and methods.Additional Resources"STARS inventory" (PDF): Mises.org/E4E_47_PDF1 "Upsizing a Customer Need" (PDF): Mises.org/E4E_47_PDF2

7 Jan 2020

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John Chisholm: The Tools and Techniques for Success in the Entrepreneurial Process

Interviews

John Chisholm is the author of Unleash Your Inner Company: Use Passion And Perseverance To Build Your Ideal Business. Entrepreneurship is a process. Taking this view enables successful navigation over time, whatever the interim ups and downs. Sometimes the process can feel like stumbling through a jungle, tripping over rocks and vines, always picking yourself up again and marching onwards. Don’t expect the process map you start with to be the one you continue with. Don’t plan too far ahead. Do be adaptive. Nonetheless, the process view is a source of support during the journey.Key Takeaways and Actionable InsightsProcesses require operating tools. John Chisholm’s toolset starts at Need and Advantage. “All you need is a Need and Advantage.” Need = "A real, unsatisfied customer need in an area about which you are passionate." He defines Need in an Austrian way: a subjective value sought or anticipated by a customer. He defines Customer as a living breathing person (or group of people, as with a corporate customer) rather than an abstract “market need”. Unsatisfied means that the need is not addressed by currently available products and services (requiring the entrepreneur to understand customer dissatisfaction). And Real means shared by a sufficient number of customers or sufficiently intense in one or more customers to make it worthy of you to satisfy. The entrepreneur must have an advantage for satisfying that need. John’s process is aimed at establishing and extending that advantage, in spite of the fact that existing businesses will have more and better resources than you. John offers a 10-step process for entrepreneurs to follow. You’ll find John’s process pretty complete, cogent, and consistent with Austrianism. We didn’t cover every step of the process in the podcast, but we did pick out two tools and one principle. Make a STARS inventory of your resources and strengths and turn them to your advantage. John recommends making and continuously updating an inventory of your individual strengths. The STARS acronym stands for Skills, Technologies that you know and can use, Assets and Achievements, Relationships and Reputation, and Inner Strengths. He has wise advice on each one of these subjects, and he suggests multiple uses for the completed STARS inventory:Use it to assess the fit of your strengths with the customer needs you have identified.Use it to identify strengths gaps you’ll need to fill.Use it to build your own self-confidence (most people under-estimate their own strengths).Use it to innovate by making new combinations by pairing STARS elements in new ways.We provide a template with directional examples a Mises.orgE4E_47_PDF1. Map out a logical and sequential growth path with John’s “bowling pins” methodology. John’s advice is to avoid tackling too large a market and too large a target customer group at the outset. Focus on a best fit intersection between your resources and customer needs. Label it. Then identify the next most logical adjacent customer need you can fill, ideally leveraging your learning from the first market. Keep on building up the map of adjacent needs to fill. When you’ve got to 10, think of them as bowling pins. Knock them down one by one, starting with the first — that’s your early focus — and ultimately completing them all. That’s your vision — the largest set of customer needs you can possibly fill. John calls this process Upsizing A Customer Need, and notes that this bowling pin strategy is particularly persuasive to venture capitalists — they like it that you are focused, and also that you have a map to growth. We reproduce John’s bowling pin map at Mises.org/E4E_47_PDF2. Make the most of limited resources: Different is better than better. How do you overcome the fact that existing businesses in a market you are trying to enter have greater resources than you? John’s answer: focus on being different rather than better. If you can identify how to be different — with a different solution, for a different target audience (even if it is small to begin with) you’ll evade competition. John has additional advice about scalability, network effects, partnering and other tools for growth. Listen to the complete podcast for a rich reward of process tools and methods.Additional Resources"STARS inventory" (PDF): Mises.org/E4E_47_PDF1 "Upsizing a Customer Need" (PDF): Mises.org/E4E_47_PDF2

7 Jan 2020

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Acadian’s John Chisholm Discusses Investments

Masters in Business

Bloomberg Opinion columnist Barry Ritholtz interviews John Chisholm, CFA and co-CEO of Acadian Asset Managment. Chisholm assumed the co-CEO role after serving as Acadian’s chief investment officer, where he oversaw Acadian’s investment process and investment team. Earlier in his career, John served as systems engineer at Draper Laboratories and as an analyst for the International Asset Management Department at the State Street Bank and Trust Company (now SSgA). He earned an M.S. in business and finance and a B.S. in engineering from MIT. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

1hr 7mins

8 Mar 2019

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