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Joseph Stalin Podcasts

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33 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Joseph Stalin. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Joseph Stalin, often where they are interviewed.

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33 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Joseph Stalin. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Joseph Stalin, often where they are interviewed.

Updated daily with the latest episodes

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Joseph Stalin Part 3: Hitler Attacks

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Stalin’s regime hits the rocks when Adolf Hitler launches Operation Barbarossa and invades Russia. Nazi tanks plough towards Moscow in a devastating advance. Stalin’s legacy is forged in this fight to the death. In his final years, the strongman succumbs to cardiac problems. His tools for progress have been famine, slavery and execution. Yet to this day, some of his countrymen and women lionise him as the man who turned Russia into a superpower.

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Jul 14 2020 · 50mins
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Joseph Stalin Part 2: The Secretary Becomes Dictator

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With the First World War underway, Stalin’s journey to becoming a brutal dictator grinds into gear. After the War, Russia is turned upside down. Stalin thrives in the chaos, masterminding a string of elaborate takedowns of his rivals. Rising to party leader, Stalin visits a ruthless purge on his enemies. The dreaded secret police cleanse the country of so-called traitors. Rural society collapses under this onslaught. But Stalin’s brutality does not go unchallenged. The peasants revolt, while a showdown with his own wife at a dinner party has tragic consequences.

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Jul 08 2020 · 56mins
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Joseph Stalin Part 1: The Young Bank Robber

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Joseph Stalin - the “man of steel” - was the party secretary who plotted a route to absolute power, becoming head of the Eastern Bloc and, in time, chief nemesis of the United States. But how did a man from the Georgian frontier of the Russian Empire do it? In 1917, the 300-year-old Romanov Dynasty collapses. The communist Bolsheviks storm the Winter Palace and seize power. From this band of revolutionaries, a future bloody dictator - a man with an extraordinary backstory - begins to emerge.

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Jul 01 2020 · 49mins
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The Man, the Myth & Legend Of Joseph Stalin with Grover Furr

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Perhaps no one in history has been as maligned in the Western Press as Joseph Stalin.

On December 18, 1878, Yosif Djugashvili was born in what is now the country of Georgia. He was born to a very poor family. His father was a shoemaker.

This is Stalin at age 16, when he started studying seminary studies at the University

He had to drop out of seminary university because his parents could not afford the fees. This made Stalin very conscious of how income inequality is oppressive. He started his own Marxist study circle.

In 1902, Stalin worked at a warehouse that caught fire. He began his activism there. He called for strikes to demand increase in pay, workplace safety measures. Soon enough, the Tsar learned that Stalin was organizing these strikes, so they arrested him. This is his mugshot

While he was in prison, he continued to agitate for workers’ rights. He organized a protest against a religious cleric’s visit. He also demanded that those in jail for political activities would live together. They put him in solitary confinement for this. However, his term in prison didn’t last long. He escaped and returned back to Georgia.

In 1912, he started using the moniker "Stalin" which means "Man of Steel" in Russian because marxism and socialism was illegal under the Tsar. After the Bolshevik Revolution, he was appointed by the new government as People's Commissar for Nationalities' Affairs. His job was to establish liaisons and win over non-Russian citizens of the former Russian empire, and he was able to unite people of many factions and religions to join the Bolsheviks during the Russian civil war.

In 1922, he was elected as the General Secretary for the Party. He was very shy and not a very good orator. However, he was elected to be the leader of the USSR once Lenin died in 1924. At first, he didn’t want the position, but the people wanted him to be the Leader. Journalist Anna Louise Strong, who was in Russia during the pre-war period, in 1936 explains

Stalin’s great moment when he first appeared as leader of the whole Soviet people was when, as Chairman of the Constitutional Commission, he presented the new Constitution of the Socialist State. A commission of thirty-one of the country’s ablest historians, economists, and political scientists had been instructed to create “the world’s most democratic constitution” with the most accurate machinery yet devised for obtaining “the will of the people.” They spent a year and a half in detailed study of every past constitution in the world, not only of governments but of trade unions and voluntary societies. The draft that they prepared was then discussed by the Soviet people for several months in more than half a million meetings attended by 36,500,000 people. The number of suggested amendments that reached the Constitutional Commission from the popular discussions was 154,000. Stalin himself is known to have read tens of thousands of the people’s letters.

Two thousand people sat in the great white hall of the Kremlin Palace when Stalin made his report to the Congress of Soviets. Below me, where I sat in the journalists’ box, was the main floor filled with the Congress deputies; around me in the loges sat the foreign diplomatic corps; behind me, in a deep gallery, were citizen-visitors. Outside the hall tens of millions of people listened over the radio, from the southern cotton fields of Central Asia to the scientific stations on the Arctic coast. It was a high point of Soviet history. But Stalin’s words were direct and simple and as informal as if he sat at a fireside talking with a few friends. He explained the significance of the Constitution, took up the suggested amendments, referred a large number of them to various lawmaking bodies and himself discussed the most important. He made it plain that everyone of those 154,000 suggestions had been classified somewhere and would influence something.

Among the dozen or more amendments which Stalin personally discussed, he approved of those that facilitated democratic expression and disapproved of those that limited democracy. Some people felt, for instance, that the different constituent republics should not be granted the right to secede from the Soviet Union; Stalin said that, while they probably would not want to secede, their right to do so should be constitutionally guaranteed as an assertion of democracy.

You can read the rest of her report here

However, during the Cold war, ridiculous amount of Western Propaganda spread with ridiculous amount of myths that usually came from self-serving testimony of Nazis. For example, in this 1950s anti-communist comic book, they recognize that the wealthy rural landowners burned their crops. While they call them “peasants”, back then peasants referred to anyone in the rural area regardless of their wealth.

Today, Grover Furr focuses on all the myths and legends surrounding Joseph Stalin, especially the underpinnings in the western press (Bourgeoise press).

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Apr 17 2020 · 1hr 20mins
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Crossover Week: Dictators (Joseph Stalin Pt. 2)

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If you enjoy the stories told in Secret Societies, check out this episode from our series Dictators: Now in total power, Joseph Stalin went on to transform the Soviet Union into a modernized country—but at the cost of millions of lives. In order to fulfill his vision of communism, the deaths of peasants and political enemies were required. 

Apr 16 2020 · 45mins
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Crossover Week: Dictators (Joseph Stalin Pt. 1)

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If you enjoy the stories told in Secret Societies, check out this episode from our series Dictators: Before he became the leader of one of the most powerful countries in the world, Joseph Stalin was an idealistic, but ruthless revolutionary. A Marxist from a young age, he devoted much of his life to overthrowing Imperial Russia. But as his star rose among the Russian socialists, so too did his list of enemies. 

Apr 16 2020 · 47mins
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Joseph Stalin Pt. 2: Soviet Union

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Now in total power, Joseph Stalin went on to transform the Soviet Union into a modernized country—but at the cost of millions of lives. In order to fulfill his vision of communism, the deaths of peasants and political enemies were required. 

Feb 11 2020 · 45mins
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Joseph Stalin Pt. 1: Soviet Union

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Before he became the leader of one of the most powerful countries in the world, Joseph Stalin was an idealistic, but ruthless revolutionary. A Marxist from a young age, he devoted much of his life to overthrowing Imperial Russia. But as his star rose among the Russian socialists, so too did his list of enemies. 

Feb 04 2020 · 45mins
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123 – Man of Steel, Heart of Ice: Joseph Stalin

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It’s the start of *DICTATOR DECEMBER*! This week, Julia covers Very Bad Person Joseph Stalin (1878-1953), General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union. Learn how this poor boy from Georgia […the country…] became one of the most feared leaders of the 20th century. Later, please enjoy a quiz on a completely different topic: “Universally Adored Humans”!
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[Music: 1) Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky, “Nutcracker Suite,” 1892; 2) Frau Holle, “Ascending Souls,” 2017. Courtesy of Frau Holle, CC BY-NC 3.0 license.]

Dec 03 2019 · 1hr 17mins
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Joseph Stalin Throws a Party in Hell - #5

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Joseph Stalin, the former leader of the Communist Party, is the leader of Hell’s Party Party and gives advice on throwing the best shindigs in the underworld and explains why he hates his new roommate Chris. Special guest Joseph Stalin played by Rooster Teeth comedian Andrew Rosas.

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Nov 11 2019 · 26mins
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