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Phil Ford Podcasts

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9 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Phil Ford. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Phil Ford, often where they are interviewed.

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9 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Phil Ford. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Phil Ford, often where they are interviewed.

Updated daily with the latest episodes

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Duke vs UNC... Gene Banks and The Great Phil Ford

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Duke and UNC have always been rivals. In this show, Gene talks with ACC great and UNC Basketball legend, Phil Ford. 

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· Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app
May 17 2020 · 54mins
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Black College Sports & Education Foundation Podcast with Special Guest Coach Phil Ford

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Join us for the Black College Sports & Education Foundation with Host Gil McGregor as he speaks with Coach Phil Ford about his former NBA playing days and the importance of receiving an education.

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Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/bcsportsfoundation/message
Nov 22 2019 · 26mins

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126 - Phil Ford & JF Martel on Weird Studies & Plural Realities

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This week Future Fossils gets even weirder with guests Phil Ford and JF Martel, cohosts of the Weird Studies podcast. Weird Studies is one of my favorite shows, hands down. Phil and JF’s marvelous threading together of the joyful and the bleak, the transcendent and the hangdog, the gems of literature and the tentacles of the ineffable real, is a sorely needed tightrope walk in an era insistent on clean answers and decisive resolutions.

The modern world is a VERY weird place, and these two gentlemen are some of my most trusted curators of places to look and ways of seeing for thriving amidst that weirdness. In this episode, we explore (among other eldritch horrors) the irreducibility and always-ness of the weird; the historical and metabolic forces that join beauty and trauma; and the value of the stubbornly unassimilated fact and its adherents.

Dig into Weird Studies and become transformed:

https://weirdstudies.com

Support Future Fossils on Patreon for over a dozen exclusive episodes, book club membership, original art and music, and more:

https://patreon.com/michaelgarfield

Find all of the books we mention and support the show at no cost to yourself:

https://www.amazon.com/shop/michaelgarfield

A very thin slice of the topics we discuss:

JF on Future Fossils (episode 18 & episode 71)

MG on Weird Studies (episode 26)

Weird Studies on Marshall McLuhan

Weird Studies on William James

Erik Davis - High Weirdness (Future Fossils episode 99; Weird Studies episode 48)

Leonard Cohen - “Waiting for the Miracle”

Phil: “The seawall we build against the seething Lovecraftian whatever.”

Eric Wargo - Time Loops (episode 117)

Global Weirding

The Replication Crisis

Lady Chatterly’s Lover: “The cataclysm has happened. We are among the ruins.”

Richard Doyle - Darwin’s Pharmacy

Douglas Rushkoff - Present Shock (episode 67)

William Burroughs - Naked Lunch

Aleister Crowley

Jonathan Zap

Furtherrr Collective

Beauty & Danger

Theodor Adorno

Weird Consultants to help you organize for the unexpected

David Weinberger - Everyday Chaos (episode 123)

lntro music by Michael Garfield, “Undefeatable Optimism Gets Up After KO”

https://michaelgarfield.bandcamp.com/album/love-scenes-field-recordings

Outro music by Evan “Skytree” Snyder feat. Michael Garfield, “God Detector”

https://skytree.bandcamp.com/track/god-detector-ft-michael-garfield

Get bonus content on Patreon

Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/futurefossils.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sep 18 2019 · 1hr 22mins
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Ep. 110 7/1/19 Chucky Brown & Phil Ford

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National sports talk radio with a Carolina twist.

In the first hour, Wolfpack great, Chucky Brown, called in to talk about all things basketball - including his new gig as the head coach at West Johnston High School.

In the second hour, UNC legend, Phil Ford, brought the kind of wisdom that will make you re-evaluate your life. Don't miss it.

NBA Free Agency is in full swing. Who's the leader in the clubhouse?

And, is Megan Rapinoe out of line? If you had the chance to visit the White House, would you let your politics stand in the way?

All this and more on this week's episode of 'From the Cheap Seats.'

'From the Cheap Seats' is a weekly sports talk radio program hosted by Chris deLambert, Brandon Atkins, Professor Trent Nichols, and the inimitable Robert Brickey; produced in central North Carolina, broadcast locally on WFJA 105.5FM, and heard around the world on the Ironiq Media Network and WRPR.

Every broadcast is recorded and made available on the web via iTunes, Google Play, and SoundCloud.

For more information, follow the show on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram at @CheapSeatRadio.

Feedback? Email the hosts at CheapSeatRadio@gmail.com.
Jul 02 2019 · 2hr

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Pod 31: New Captain Scarlet Writer Phil Ford (Part One)

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Phil Ford is best known by Gerry Anderson fans for being the main writer on his 2005 series New Captain Scarlet. But Phil is a prolific writer outside of the world of Anderson including writing for Taggart, The Bill, Coronation Street, Doctor Who, The Sarah Jane Adventures and Wizards vs Aliens.

In part one of his interview, Phil talks us through his early Anderson TV memories and how he got into writing for TV.

There's a brand new segment this week - FAB Facts, plus your usual news, listener emails, and randomiser. Enjoy!

Jan 14 2019 · 1hr 44mins
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Tim's Take On: Episode 400(Phil Ford at Whooverville 9)

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Coverage of Whooverville 9 continues, this time an interview with Phil Ford writer for Doctor Who, Sarah Jane Adventures and Wizards Vs Aliens.

You can see my photos of Whooverville 9 here https://www.flickr.com/photos/tdrury/albums/72157688450619545

End Theme: Dr Who(Gypsy Guitar) by Thrip

The show is now on Facebook please join the group for exclusive behind the scenes insights and of course also discuss and feedback on the show https://www.facebook.com/groups/187162411486307/ If you want to send me comments or feedback you can email them to tdrury2003@yahoo.co.uk or contact me on twitter where I'm @tdrury or send me a friend request and your comments to facebook where I'm Tim Drury and look like this http://www.flickr.com/photos/tdrury/3711029536/in/set-72157621161239599/ in case you were wondering.

Sep 15 2017 · 37mins
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Phil Ford, “Dig: Sound and Music in Hip Culture” (Oxford UP, 2013)

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What is hip? Can a piece of music be hip? Or is hipness primarily a way of engaging with music which recognizes the hip potential of the music? Or primarily a manner of being, which allows the hip individual to authentically engage with the hip artwork? Whatever the case may be, we know that the hip is meant to be authentic. We know that it is opposed to the square:all that is inauthentic, conformist, and authoritarian. And we know that attempts to understand hipness tend to locate it in the sonorous immediacy of musical experience.

Phil Ford‘s, Dig: Sound and Music in Hip Culture (Oxford University Press, 2013) uses these attempts to understand hipness as an entry into the altogether more intractable problem of defining hipness itself. Ford traces the hip sensibility from its roots in the African-American subcultures that arose in cities such as New York and Chicago in the aftermath of the Great Migration, through its adoption (or appropriation) by the beat poets of the 1950s and the counterculture movement of the 1960s. In doing so, he marshals a wide array of sources:newspaper columns, jazz improvisations, political posters, liner notes, diaries, and amateur acetate recordings, all grappling — in creative, illuminating, and sometimes painful ways — with the impossibility of capturing the lived experience of hipness.


In the closing chapters of the book, he turns to two specific figures, Norman Mailer (a major writer), and John Benson Brooks (a somewhat peripheral jazz musician), reevaluating their works — and perhaps more importantly, their methods of working — in the light of the hip aesthetics described in the earlier sections of the book.


Further Listening/Viewing/Reading:


John Benson Brooks Trio: Avant Slant


Thomas Frank: The Conquest of Cool

Fruity Pebbles Rap

Rip Torn attacks Norman Mailer with a Hammer

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Dec 10 2015 · 46mins
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Phil Ford, “Dig: Sound and Music in Hip Culture” (Oxford UP, 2013)

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What is hip? Can a piece of music be hip? Or is hipness primarily a way of engaging with music which recognizes the hip potential of the music? Or primarily a manner of being, which allows the hip individual to authentically engage with the hip artwork? Whatever the case may be, we know that the hip is meant to be authentic. We know that it is opposed to the square:all that is inauthentic, conformist, and authoritarian. And we know that attempts to understand hipness tend to locate it in the sonorous immediacy of musical experience.

Phil Ford‘s, Dig: Sound and Music in Hip Culture (Oxford University Press, 2013) uses these attempts to understand hipness as an entry into the altogether more intractable problem of defining hipness itself. Ford traces the hip sensibility from its roots in the African-American subcultures that arose in cities such as New York and Chicago in the aftermath of the Great Migration, through its adoption (or appropriation) by the beat poets of the 1950s and the counterculture movement of the 1960s. In doing so, he marshals a wide array of sources:newspaper columns, jazz improvisations, political posters, liner notes, diaries, and amateur acetate recordings, all grappling — in creative, illuminating, and sometimes painful ways — with the impossibility of capturing the lived experience of hipness.


In the closing chapters of the book, he turns to two specific figures, Norman Mailer (a major writer), and John Benson Brooks (a somewhat peripheral jazz musician), reevaluating their works — and perhaps more importantly, their methods of working — in the light of the hip aesthetics described in the earlier sections of the book.


Further Listening/Viewing/Reading:


John Benson Brooks Trio: Avant Slant


Thomas Frank: The Conquest of Cool

Fruity Pebbles Rap

Rip Torn attacks Norman Mailer with a Hammer

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Dec 10 2015 · 46mins
Episode artwork

Phil Ford, “Dig: Sound and Music in Hip Culture” (Oxford UP, 2013)

Play
Read more

What is hip? Can a piece of music be hip? Or is hipness primarily a way of engaging with music which recognizes the hip potential of the music? Or primarily a manner of being, which allows the hip individual to authentically engage with the hip artwork? Whatever the case may be, we know that the hip is meant to be authentic. We know that it is opposed to the square:all that is inauthentic, conformist, and authoritarian. And we know that attempts to understand hipness tend to locate it in the sonorous immediacy of musical experience.

Phil Ford‘s, Dig: Sound and Music in Hip Culture (Oxford University Press, 2013) uses these attempts to understand hipness as an entry into the altogether more intractable problem of defining hipness itself. Ford traces the hip sensibility from its roots in the African-American subcultures that arose in cities such as New York and Chicago in the aftermath of the Great Migration, through its adoption (or appropriation) by the beat poets of the 1950s and the counterculture movement of the 1960s. In doing so, he marshals a wide array of sources:newspaper columns, jazz improvisations, political posters, liner notes, diaries, and amateur acetate recordings, all grappling — in creative, illuminating, and sometimes painful ways — with the impossibility of capturing the lived experience of hipness.


In the closing chapters of the book, he turns to two specific figures, Norman Mailer (a major writer), and John Benson Brooks (a somewhat peripheral jazz musician), reevaluating their works — and perhaps more importantly, their methods of working — in the light of the hip aesthetics described in the earlier sections of the book.


Further Listening/Viewing/Reading:


John Benson Brooks Trio: Avant Slant


Thomas Frank: The Conquest of Cool

Fruity Pebbles Rap

Rip Torn attacks Norman Mailer with a Hammer

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Dec 10 2015 · 47mins