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Cristina Bicchieri

11 Podcast Episodes

Latest 18 Jul 2021 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

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Ep 45. Social Norms (ft. Cristina Bicchieri)

Questioning Behaviour

In this episode of Questioning Behaviour Sarah and Merle talk to behavioural science legend Cristina Bicchieri about her work in behavioural science, applying behavioural science to changing behaviours through the application of social norms, all over the world! FInding Cristina: University of Pennsylvania: https://philosophy.sas.upenn.edu/people/cristina-bicchieri Coursera: https://www.coursera.org/instructor/~806874 Norms in the Wild (Book): https://www.amazon.co.uk/Norms-Wild-Diagnose-Measure-Change/dp/0190622040 Grammar of Society (Book): https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/0521574900/ref=cm_sw_r_tw_dp_PXAV0FTHM26P6KXQ3J0J? Questioning Behaviour Links: Facebook: @QBpodcast (https://www.facebook.com/QBPodcast)Insta: @questioningbehaviour (https://www.instagram.com/questioning...) Twitter: @QB_podcast (https://twitter.com/QB_Podcast) LinkedIn: @Questioning Behaviour (https://www.linkedin.com/groups/8928118/)  Music: Derek Clegg “You’re the Dummy” https://derekclegg.bandcamp.com/

1hr 1min

31 May 2021

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BEworks Conversations with Cristina Bicchieri: How Norm Nudging can Help Reduce the Spread of COVID-19

BEworks Conversations

BEworks Conversations with Cristina Bicchieri: How Norm Nudging can Help Reduce the Spread of COVID-19For more information about this episode, including the full transcript, visit our blog at https://blog.beworks.com/becurious/beworks-conversations-with-cristina-bicchieri-how-norm-nudging-can-help-reduce-the-spread-of-covid-19This episode of the BEworks Conversation series features a discussion with Cristina Bicchieri. Professor of Philosophy and Psychology, University of PennsylvaniaCristina Bicchieri is the S.J. Patterson Harvie Professor of Social Thought and Comparative Ethics at the University of Pennsylvania, and Director of the Master of Behavioral and Decision Sciences program. She is a foremost scholar of rational choice and philosophy of social science and a leader in behavioral ethics.In this conversation, Kelly and Cristina discuss how social norms and nudging norm behavior can be a powerful way to influence behavior during the pandemic. Cristina also discusses the interesting research she has been doing during the pandemic.----more----In this conversation, Cristina and Kelly discuss: Social norms and compliance during the pandemic Increasing adoption of COVID-19 notification apps

44mins

19 Mar 2021

Similar People

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Covid-19 Crisis: Cristina Bicchieri – Messaging Rules For Improving Social Behavior

Behavioral Grooves Podcast

Cristina Bicchieri, PhD is the S. J. Patterson Harvie Professor of Social Thought and Comparative Ethics, a Professor of Philosophy and Psychology at the University of Pennsylvania, a Professor of Legal Studies at the Wharton School, the Head of the Behavioral Ethics Lab, the Director of the Philosophy, Politics, and Economics Program, and is the Faculty Director of the Master of Behavioral and Decision Sciences Program at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research with UNICEF keeps her busy around the world, as well. Our discussion with Cristina offers more than just a few tips (noted below). Cristina’s observations are based on a lifetime of excellent research and writing and we are happy to share them with you. Also, Cristina was our guest on episode 102, where you can help yourself to more insights on social norms and reference networks in that conversation. We also asked Cristina to get out her crystal ball to share her visions of Also, listeners might want to think about these tips for all of the corporate and customer-focused messaging. 6 Rules For April 2020 Do not send conflicting information Make the desired behavior observable Reinforce positive behaviors seen in others Choose the appropriate reference network Avoid moralizing messages Avoid ambiguity In our grooving session, Kurt offered a thought experiment for how the media might frame bad behaviors in their reporting. © 2020 Behavioral GroovesLinksConnect with Kurt and Tim: Kurt Nelson, PhD: @WhatMotivates  e-mail: kurt@lanterngroup.com Tim Houlihan: @THoulihan  e-mail: tim@behavioralchemy.com Lantern Group: http://lanterngroup.com/ BehaviorAlchemy: https://www.behavioralchemy.com/ Behavioral Grooves: https://behavioralgrooves.com/ Weekly Grooves: https://weeklygrooves.podbean.com/ Common Biases & Heuristics: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1XHpBr0VFcaT8wIUpr-9zMIb79dFMgOVFRxIZRybiftI/edit# Patreon Site for Behavioral Grooves: https://www.patreon.com/behavioralgrooves General Coronavirus Info: Daily Newsletter Summarizing data from Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security: http://www.centerforhealthsecurity.org/newsroom/newsletters/e-newsletter-sign-up.html CDC: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html Great videos on the science behind this by Dr. Peter Attia – this is the first in a series: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CNVhLyAlfA4 What is herd immunity?: https://www.technologyreview.com/s/615375/what-is-herd-immunity-and-can-it-stop-the-coronavirus/ A list curated by Liam.Delaney@UCD.ie https://docs.google.com/document/d/11GLhX7hLf64Bxkdpv5hvYHqOjS1imlcMQFjJBJ-9oUM/edit Coronavirus & Behavioral Science: Selected Links: The Behavioral Sice of Coronavirus: https://behavioralscientist.org/selected-links-the-behavioral-science-of-the-coronavirus-covid-19/ Why no one is reading your coronavirus email: https://edition.cnn.com/2020/03/13/opinions/coronavirus-emails-effective-messaging-rogers/index.html Handwashing can stop a virus, so why don’t we do it?: https://behavioralscientist.org/handwashing-can-stop-a-virus-so-why-dont-we-do-it-coronavirus-covid-19/ The behavioral science of handwashing: https://think.ing.com/articles/the-behavioural-science-of-hand-washing/ Ideas 42: The Behavioral Side of COVID-19 here: https://ideas42.org/covid19/ Greater Good: https://twitter.com/GreaterGoodSC How We Can Cope During This Crisis: Tip Sheet from HUMU: https://humu.com/remote-nudges/ Resources for learning at home: https://fordhaminstitute.org/national/commentary/resources-learning-home-during-covid-19-school-closures?utm_source=join1440&utm_medium=email&utm_placement=etcetera General Behavioral Science Links: Common Biases and Heuristics: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1XHpBr0VFcaT8wIUpr-9zMIb79dFMgOVFRxIZRybiftI/edit# Jonathan Haidt – 5 Moral Foundations: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moral_foundations_theory Annie Duke’s “How To Decide”: https://www.amazon.com/How-Decide-Simple-Making-Choices/dp/0593084608 “16 Ways To Promote Hand Washing With Behavioral Science” article by Aline Holzwarth: https://www.forbes.com/sites/alineholzwarth/2020/03/25/handwashing-with-behavioral-science/#261b4b9f768d Aline Holzwarth’s Playlist on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/0H5fsQRrqslGdBhhx8d4Aw?si=0jra0rU1Qu2vQNtqjbRvZA Deontological and Consequential Moralities: https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/ethics-deontological/#DeoTheKan Difference between descriptive and injunctive norms: https://psychology.stackexchange.com/questions/6193/whats-the-difference-between-injunctive-norms-and-descriptive-norms Emotion Research from FinalMile: http://finalmile.in/research/ Pandemic Playbook from FinalMile: https://www.playbookforpandemic.com/

1hr 18mins

11 Apr 2020

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Cristina Bicchieri: Social Norms are Bundles of Expectations

Behavioral Grooves Podcast

Cristina Bicchieri, PhD is the S. J. Patterson Harvie Professor of Social Thought and Comparative Ethics, a Professor of Philosophy and Psychology at the University of Pennsylvania, a Professor of Legal Studies at the Wharton School, the Head of the Behavioral Ethics Lab, the Director of the Philosophy, Politics, and Economics Program, and is the Faculty Director of the Master of Behavioral and Decision Sciences Program at the University of Pennsylvania. She’s one busy woman! We met up with her at the NoBeC (Norms and Behavioral Change) conference that her program sponsored in the Kislak Center at UPenn. Cristina’s program is in its 3rd year and hosts 75 students from 12 different countries. The unique program emphasizes practical applications of behavioral science and cross-disciplinary work. Students come from celebrity restaurants, tech businesses, NGOs, non-profits and global corporations and find the program engaging because of its diversity. If you’re interested, we encourage you to check it out – there are links in the episode notes for how to reach them. We had some recording issues when we were talking to Christina. Some edits were made to accommodate our gaffs and we hope you won’t mind. And, because we recorded it on the sidelines of a conference, you might hear some background noise occasionally.  © 2019 Behavioral Grooves  LinksCristina Bicchieri, PhD: https://philosophy.sas.upenn.edu/people/cristina-bicchieri The Grammar of Society: https://www.cambridge.org/core/books/grammar-of-society/2B063E9C9621C2340DEFB2BE15B3AEA5 Norms in the Wild: https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/norms-in-the-wild-how-to-diagnose-measure-and-change-social-norms/ Master in a Behavioral Decision Science at UPenn: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lps/graduate/mbds Decision Theory: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decision_theory Game Theory: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Game_theory Epistemic Foundations of Game Theory: https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/epistemic-game/ Multiple Equilibria: https://www.encyclopedia.com/social-sciences/applied-and-social-sciences-magazines/multiple-equilibria David Kreps, PhD: https://www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/faculty/david-m-kreps Social Norms: https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/social-norms/ Conditional Preference: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/~cb36/files/2010_norm.pdf UNICEF: https://www.unicef.org/ Gates Foundation: https://www.gatesfoundation.org/ Reference Network: http://www.iit.comillas.edu/technology-offer/rnm Soap Opera: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soap_opera Well Told Story: https://www.welltoldstory.com/  Musical LinksGiuseppe Verdi: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e3UAd3d8I6k Wolfgang Mozart: https://www.biography.com/musician/wolfgang-mozart Bruce Springsteen: https://brucespringsteen.net/ U2: https://www.u2.com/index/home Chicago: https://chicagotheband.com/ The Band: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sjCw3-YTffo Styx: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5XcKBmdfpWs Journey: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qMSFsZFFUzo Fleetwood Mac: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kBYHwH1Vb-c Kurt Nelson: kurt@lantergroup.com Tim Houlihan: tim@behavioralchemy.com

55mins

8 Dec 2019

Most Popular

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13. Cristina Bicchieri on social norms of corruption, Antanas Mockus and Soap Operas

KickBack - The Global Anticorruption Podcast

The interview this week features Cristina Bicchieri – the S. J. Patterson Harvie Professor of Social Thought and Comparative Ethics at University of Pennsylvania. The Kickback interview kicks off withCristina’s early work on corruption in the mid 1990’s together with the physicist Carlo Rovelli (1995) and John Duffy (1997) and how this work was sparked by the mani pulite scandal in Italy. This theoretical work describes why corruption is often so “sticky” . Cristina then outlines the importance of measurement to provide empirical support for her theoretical concepts, especially the distinction between unconditional versus conditional behavior and empirical versus normative expectations (for more info on this we highly recommend her newest book: Norms in the Wild). She describes how cleverly designed vignette studies help researchers to understand why a certain behavior persists. One of the places where Cristina has done research on corruption is Nigeria (for more details see Hofmann & Patel) where she finds interesting differences in perceived frequency and acceptability of corruption depending on the gender of the perpetrator. The interview also covers what Cristina has learned in the past decades of doing research on corruption.Anti -CorruptionCristina outlines how making the negative consequences of corruption salient could help to deter corruption and why classical punitive measures usually don't work. Another interesting nugget: When it comes to information campaigns, providing information about the high corruption levels of others can backfire by giving people a license to corrupt themselves. Finally, Nils and Cristina discuss the work of the former mayor of Bogotá, Antanas Mockus, who became famous for his unorthodox measures to change social norms. For example, you can find out how pantomimes helped to improve the traffic situation in Bogotá.Cristina’s Picks of the podcast:Bicchieri C (2016) Norms in the Wild: How to Diagnose, Measure, and Change Social Norms, 1 edition. Oxford University Press, New York, NYThe soap opera: Simplemente MariaIf you want to find out more about Cristina’s work:Bicchieri, C., & Duffy, J. (1997). Corruption cycles. Political Studies, 45(3), 477–495. http://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9248.00092Bicchieri, C., & Rovelli, C. (1995). Evolution and Revolution: The Dynamics of Corruption. Rationality and Society, 7(2), 201–224. http://doi.org/10.1177/1043463195007002007Bicchieri, C., & Mercier, H. (2014). Norms and Beliefs: How Change Occurs. The Jerusalem Philosophical Quarterly, 63(January 2014), 60–82. http://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-05308-0Bicchieri, C., & Dimant, E. (2019). Nudging with Care: The Risks and Benefits of Social Information. SSRN Electronic Journal, (January). http://doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3319088Hoffmann LK, Patel RN (2017) Collective Action on Corruption in Nigeria: A social norms approach to connecting society and institutions. 1–53

35mins

2 Sep 2019

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The Greg Suess Podcast S02 E06: Cristina Bicchieri

Greg Suess Podcast

On this episode Greg sits down with this month’s Brains & Behavior distinguished lecturer Dr. Cristina Bicchieri to talk about the study of social norms, and how they predict behavior (5:51), putting a philosopher’s theories into experiments ( 7:31), applying social norm theory with UNICEF in the third world (9:11), the process and strategies of changing social norms (10:50), comparing social norms in America to Europe (18:46), using positive deviance to change culture & to start a movement (23:27), the relationship between biology & social norms (32:49), and the bureaucracy of dealing with the world’s governments (36:25).

43mins

15 May 2017

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Cristina Bicchieri, “Norms in the Wild: How to Diagnose, Measure, and Change Social Norms” (Oxford UP, 2017)

New Books in Public Policy

Humans engage in a wide variety of collective behaviors, ranging from simple customs like wearing a heavy coat in winter to more complex group actions, as when an audience gives applause at the close of a musical performance. Some of these collective behaviors are cases of imitation, of doing what others do. In other cases, the behavior is driven by individuals’ expectations about what certain people both do and believe others should do. When confronting real-world cases where groups act in ways that are problematic and harmful, it matters a great deal which kind of mechanism underlies the behavior. This is especially the case for those who seek to change the groups’ behavior.In Norms in the Wild: How to Diagnose, Measure, and Change Social Norms (Oxford University Press, 2017), Cristina Bicchieri (University of Pennsylvania) lays out a nuanced theory of group behavior, establishes means for measuring individuals’ sensitivity to social norms, and explores the ways in which interventions can be designed to change social norms. The book grows out of her collaboration with UNICEF and other NGO’s devoted to initiating social change in the developing world. The details of Bicchieri’s theory of social norms are explored in her Coursera courses on “Social Norms, Social Change I” and “Social Norms, Social Change II.” Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/public-policy

57mins

1 Apr 2017

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Cristina Bicchieri, “Norms in the Wild: How to Diagnose, Measure, and Change Social Norms” (Oxford UP, 2017)

New Books in Sociology

Humans engage in a wide variety of collective behaviors, ranging from simple customs like wearing a heavy coat in winter to more complex group actions, as when an audience gives applause at the close of a musical performance. Some of these collective behaviors are cases of imitation, of doing what others do. In other cases, the behavior is driven by individuals’ expectations about what certain people both do and believe others should do. When confronting real-world cases where groups act in ways that are problematic and harmful, it matters a great deal which kind of mechanism underlies the behavior. This is especially the case for those who seek to change the groups’ behavior.In Norms in the Wild: How to Diagnose, Measure, and Change Social Norms (Oxford University Press, 2017), Cristina Bicchieri (University of Pennsylvania) lays out a nuanced theory of group behavior, establishes means for measuring individuals’ sensitivity to social norms, and explores the ways in which interventions can be designed to change social norms. The book grows out of her collaboration with UNICEF and other NGO’s devoted to initiating social change in the developing world. The details of Bicchieri’s theory of social norms are explored in her Coursera courses on “Social Norms, Social Change I” and “Social Norms, Social Change II.” Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sociology

57mins

1 Apr 2017

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Cristina Bicchieri, “Norms in the Wild: How to Diagnose, Measure, and Change Social Norms” (Oxford UP, 2017)

New Books in Anthropology

Humans engage in a wide variety of collective behaviors, ranging from simple customs like wearing a heavy coat in winter to more complex group actions, as when an audience gives applause at the close of a musical performance. Some of these collective behaviors are cases of imitation, of doing what others do. In other cases, the behavior is driven by individuals’ expectations about what certain people both do and believe others should do. When confronting real-world cases where groups act in ways that are problematic and harmful, it matters a great deal which kind of mechanism underlies the behavior. This is especially the case for those who seek to change the groups’ behavior.In Norms in the Wild: How to Diagnose, Measure, and Change Social Norms (Oxford University Press, 2017), Cristina Bicchieri (University of Pennsylvania) lays out a nuanced theory of group behavior, establishes means for measuring individuals’ sensitivity to social norms, and explores the ways in which interventions can be designed to change social norms. The book grows out of her collaboration with UNICEF and other NGO’s devoted to initiating social change in the developing world. The details of Bicchieri’s theory of social norms are explored in her Coursera courses on “Social Norms, Social Change I” and “Social Norms, Social Change II.” Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/anthropology

57mins

1 Apr 2017

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Cristina Bicchieri, “Norms in the Wild: How to Diagnose, Measure, and Change Social Norms” (Oxford UP, 2017)

New Books in Philosophy

Humans engage in a wide variety of collective behaviors, ranging from simple customs like wearing a heavy coat in winter to more complex group actions, as when an audience gives applause at the close of a musical performance. Some of these collective behaviors are cases of imitation, of doing what others do. In other cases, the behavior is driven by individuals’ expectations about what certain people both do and believe others should do. When confronting real-world cases where groups act in ways that are problematic and harmful, it matters a great deal which kind of mechanism underlies the behavior. This is especially the case for those who seek to change the groups’ behavior. In Norms in the Wild: How to Diagnose, Measure, and Change Social Norms (Oxford University Press, 2017), Cristina Bicchieri (University of Pennsylvania) lays out a nuanced theory of group behavior, establishes means for measuring individuals’ sensitivity to social norms, and explores the ways in which interventions can be designed to change social norms. The book grows out of her collaboration with UNICEF and other NGO’s devoted to initiating social change in the developing world. The details of Bicchieri’s theory of social norms are explored in her Coursera courses on “Social Norms, Social Change I” and “Social Norms, Social Change II.” Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/philosophy

58mins

1 Apr 2017

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