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Rebekah Bostan

7 Podcast Episodes

Latest 24 Sep 2022 | Updated Daily

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Ep.74 - How to ask for part-time work by making a business case, Rebekah Bostan, InsTech London

The Risky Mix Podcast

Key learning points1.Changing attitudes to part-time and flexible working2.How part-time workers could contribute just as much as full-time workers3.Tips for how you can make the shift to part-time work Today on the Risky Mix podcast we’re delighted to be rejoined by Rebekah Bostan, Director of Research and Insight at InsTech. Through sharing her learnings as a 14-year award-winning flexible worker, Rebekah will take us through the advantages that part-time work arrangements can offer both employees and businesses and will also challenge the stereotypes that surround this type of work, before providing some tips on how to ask your employer for a part-time role.Rebekah begins by sharing how she looked to pursue part-time work after starting her family relatively young. It was the early-2000s, so part-time and flexible work options were quite rare, but as she was looking to balance childcare with caring for her partner with a disability, she was determined. She made a bold request and with a bit of help from lady luck, was successful in securing a part-time role. Rebekah tells us that this set-up not only allowed her to balance household responsibilities but also to do other things – she helped rebuild her local community centre and became a board member in local organisations.Discussing attitudes to flexible work, Rebekah explains how throughout her career she encountered a wealth of ‘superfluous’ reasons for why part-time would never work, and yet during the pandemic, flexible working has proved completely possible. People have had no choice but to juggle work with caring requirements and social distancing necessitated work-from-home arrangements. But there is a long way to go for changing perceptions on part-work. She tells us of its ‘gendered nature’ as mostly women work part-time; often it’s seen as going down a ‘mummy career track’. Rebekah says you are still perceived as contributing less if not working a five-day week. Yet having experienced both full and part-time roles, Rebekah tells us that part-time workers are some of the ‘most structured, efficient, organised people because they have narrow time to do the work’. Working five days a week, she argues, can leave the door open for unproductive tasks and procrastination.Rebekah also shares with us her ‘formula’ for how to ask your employer for part-time work:1.Recognise the business before yourself. It’s not just about what you need - you have the right to ask for part-time work, but you don’t have the right to be granted it – your employer isn’t obliged to make changes unless it’s a medical adjustment. So you need to think about how you going part-time would benefit the business too.2.All teams have their limits – think about what consequences your move to part-time will have on your managers and team members. Lots of teams are often overstretched and exhausted – so a request could be viewed as additional pressure - how will you counter this?3.Recognise the role of manager discretion. Take time to figure out what your managers are worried about. Eg, is it cost, delivery timelines, or headcount? This can help you form a counterargument.4.Triage your role. Get your work tasks down on paper, and sort them into three circles): a.The ‘core’ tasks – high-value stuff that’s important to your manager or next job – the things you can’t compromise on and you will keep. b.‘Low-value tasks’ – can these be automated, or even stopped?  c.The ‘delegation’ tasks – these should be sold as a golden opportunity to the people doing them – how can these grow your team’s skills?5.Treat it like you are building a business case!Rebekah also recommends looking at the charity Timewise (https://timewise.co.uk).

32mins

11 Mar 2022

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Ep.73 - Managing the menopause at work, Rebekah Bostan, InsTech London

The Risky Mix Podcast

The Key Learning Points:1. How organisations can support women during menopause2. How people are affected by (early) menopause3. The importance of discussing menopause in society and at work Today on the Risky Mix podcast we’re delighted to be joined by Rebekah Bostan, Director of Research and Insight at InsTech London and an award-winning diversity champion. Rebekah will be talking all about the menopause, including outlining some of the lesser-known symptoms and addressing some of the big misconceptions. Drawing from her own experience of unexpected early menopause, Rebekah will also share strategies for managing menopause at work and suggest how colleagues can support someone going through it. Rebekah explains that, in her late 30's, she started to experience changes in her menstrual cycle. She says she was becoming increasingly intolerant and felt claustrophobic (later recognised as hot flush). She forgot common details like her children’s names (brain fog) and found it uncomfortable sitting down (a sign of vaginal dryness). Rebekah says she also struggled with anxiety. She wanted to grow her career, now that her kids were teens, but feared she would have to ‘lean out’. She explains it was a scary conversation to have; she had worked so hard to climb the corporate ladder and to persuade people to respect her as an equal, but now she had to ask to be treated a little differently (which, she reminds us, is ok too!).Rebekah went to her GP believing she had early-onset dementia, but her GP recognised the signs of early menopause – having 28 out of 30 known symptoms! It turns out that both her mum and her grandmother had experienced early menopause, yet they'd never shared this with her. Rebekah believes this is because as a society we have ‘pushed menopause to a place where we don’t talk about it’. As a result, she struggled to recognise and define her symptoms - she lacked the language. She tells us it angers her that menopause isn’t discussed more, despite being a natural thing with symptoms that can generally be treated.Rebekah tells us that her GP’s referral to an early menopause clinic had a nine-month wait, but she was lucky to have access to private medical treatment. But Rebekah tells us that she also leaned on other resources, including ‘menopause cafés’ where she talked to women at different stages of menopause.Rebekah also tells us how she navigated her diagnosis at work. She worked part-time, which helped tremendously. As her company wasn’t talking about menopause, she created a menopause policy and groups (but warns us that policies only work if management buys into them!). She also tells us how asking for help was hard, but the best thing she did – she delegated her tasks to her team and chose opportunities that would allow her colleagues to grow.We then talk about what teams can do to support someone experiencing menopause. Rebekah stresses the value of flexible working – such as working from home and the option to reduce hours. She wants employers to give people room to say what they need and then to provide that support. Rebekah told us how she felt comfortable telling her team when she was having a ‘brain-foggy’ day – allowing her colleagues to step in where necessary – and she would support them when they needed help too. She also urges people working in HR to distinguish menopausal sick days from normal sick days – as it can be stressful if you are perceived to be taking too much time off.We also ask Rebekah if she has any final advice for people going through menopause. She urges people to track their symptoms and see a GP. If your GP isn’t taking your symptoms seriously, she says, find another one! She also recommends the resource menopausematters.co.uk. Finally, she urges people with the financial capacity to use private healthcare where they can, as she wants as many women as possible to stay in leadership.

35mins

25 Feb 2022

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#105: HEART: On Sharing Home Chores (Fairly) - Joy Foster, Rebekah Bostan and Evelini Quarrell

School For Fathers Podcast

Sick and tired of being the one to think about *E - V - E - R - Y - T - H - I - N - G* at home - from birthday gifts, cleaning {or organising the cleaner}, planning life, + remembering to put the bins out—basically the whole shebang? You’re not alone. Lockdown’s been a magnifying glass on all those niggling chores that nobody else picks up. If you could, would you renegotiate sharing these domestics and who thinks about them? The mundane repetitive stuff that has to be done by someone. But does it need to be you? Course not. Join my guests and I, as we explore exactly how to divvy up the domestics fairly. I’m joined by guests: Joy Foster - Founder of Tech Pixies Rebekah Bostan - Corporate Professional and Diversity Advocate Evelini Quarrell - Podcast Host

1hr 2mins

7 Jan 2022

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HEART: On Sharing Home Chores (Fairly) - Joy Foster, Rebekah Bostan and Evelini Quarrell - SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT

School for Mothers Podcast

Sick and tired of being the one to think about *E - V - E - R - Y - T - H - I - N - G* at home - from birthday gifts, cleaning {or organising the cleaner}, planning life, + remembering to put the bins out—basically the whole shebang? You’re not alone. Lockdown’s been a magnifying glass on all those niggling chores that nobody else picks up. If you could, would you renegotiate sharing these domestics and who thinks about them? The mundane repetitive stuff that has to be done by someone. But does it need to be you? Course not. Join my guests and I, as we explore exactly how to divvy up the domestics fairly. I’m joined by guests: Joy Foster - Founder of Tech Pixies Rebekah Bostan - Corporate Professional and Diversity Advocate Evelini Quarrell - Podcast Host This episode is the audio of a LIVE roundtable I filmed with my guest over in the School for Mothers Group - come join us here

1hr 2mins

2 Jan 2022

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#26: COVID-19 and Working Parents - Rebekah Bostan

School For Fathers Podcast

Can we predict the long-term impact of COVID-19 on working parents’ careers? In this ep I’m joined by Rebekah Bostan, Data Operations Manager and flexible work advocate. We explore the need for a personal contingency plan - where homeschooling is NOT the top of the list. We also get right into how to have difficult conversations when it comes to managing work/life balance in a partnership.  If you’re wondering how to manage the upcoming months this episode will help get your priorities in order. Here's the link to the Todd Herman's article  Read the full shownotes over on our website >> http://schoolforfathers.com/podcast/26-covid-19-and-working-parents-rebekah-bostan/

1hr 7mins

24 Apr 2020

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Here’s How COVID-19 Can Hurt Your Career - Rebekah Bostan - SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT

School for Mothers Podcast

Can we predict the long-term impact of COVID-19 on working mothers’ careers? In this ep I’m joined by Rebekah Bostan, Data Operations Manager and flexible work advocate. We explore the need for a personal contingency plan - where homeschooling is NOT the top of the list. If you’re wondering how to balance the upcoming months this episode will help get your priorities in order. Read the full show notes over on our website >>> https://www.schoolformothers.com/podcast_sfm/sunday-supplement-rebekah-bostan/

1hr

29 Mar 2020

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Do you have to be a dazzling outlier? with Rebekah Bostan

A Brilliant Gamble

On this week’s show I’m talking to Rebekah Bostan who responded to my survey on midlife expectations and experiences of work. Brought up during apartheid in South Africa, making a difference is in her genes. Her mother ran an illegal mixed race school, bringing children from Soweto to learn at a school with white kids and Rebekah learnt that it’s always possible to do something to change things. Today she combines her corporate career with raising the profile of flexible working, diversity, inclusion and the menopause. I wanted to talk to her because leaving your job to start your own business isn’t the only option, or might not be an option right now. How can you not only improve your own experiences of work but also change the culture for those who come after? In this interview we discuss: The challenge she and so many others are experiencing balancing work with midlife - family, menopause, awakening, personal wants and ambitions How she’s talking about working flexibly rather than keeping it a secret The work she’s doing with parent groups and others within her organisation and outside of it The blog she created to share her ideas about diversity, inclusion, flex and menopause You can read more about Rebekah’s thoughts and experiences on her blog. Rebekah is also a member of our Corporate Escapees Facebook Group so if you have questions or experiences to share, do head over and post in that group. We’d love to have you! Stay in touch with us on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter and of course, the website.

44mins

2 Jul 2019